External drives - compatible with Linux? - Hardware

This is a discussion on External drives - compatible with Linux? - Hardware ; Charlie Gibbs wrote: > Well, my big Linux box just bit it again. Looks like I blew another > motherboard, and this time it took the power supply with it. So I'm > once again praying that my hard drives, ...

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Thread: External drives - compatible with Linux?

  1. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Charlie Gibbs wrote:

    > Well, my big Linux box just bit it again. Looks like I blew another
    > motherboard, and this time it took the power supply with it. So I'm
    > once again praying that my hard drives, with their 500GB of downloads,
    > survived. Last time I was lucky - maybe I will be again. But I think
    > it's time I did something better than trying to get this stuff burnt
    > onto DVDs before the box blows up again.
    >
    > There are plenty of external USB hard drives out there that should
    > do the trick. But are they compatible with Linux? All this talk
    > of driver software, one-touch backup buttons, etc. makes these drives
    > sound like something that you can't just plug into a Linux box and
    > mount. Does anyone have any experience with these units? Do they
    > work under Linux, or have they been designed to work under Windows only?
    >
    > Any suggestions as to brands, and user stories good or bad, are
    > welcome. How about getting an internal drive and one of those
    > external enclosures, which presumably have some sort of IDE-to-USB
    > adapter in them - is this an option?
    >
    > Comments, please - I need the peace of mind that only a good backup
    > can give.
    >


    I have three external USB drives, I use generic USB case and installed an
    IDE drive into. No problems what so ever.

    Now for the already comerical ones I don't know.

  2. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    On 20 Aug 08 13:54:05 -0800, Charlie Gibbs wrote:

    > There are plenty of external USB hard drives out there that should
    > do the trick. But are they compatible with Linux?


    All you need is a USB to (mini-)IDE adapter (and a hard drive). If you
    can find a notebook HD big enough, they're easier to deal with and you
    can power the drive directly from a USB jack. There shouldn't be any
    problem with Linux compatibility.

    Bob T.

  3. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > ... Does anyone have any experience with these units? Do they
    > work under Linux, or have they been designed to work under Windows only?


    I've got a Western-Digital something-or-another USB brick on may machine
    at work (I'm at home right now or I'd tell you more). /proc/scsi/scsi
    shows it to be a Model: 2500JB External. No problems under Linux (CentOS4).


    --
    Steve Wampler -- swampler@noao.edu
    The gods that smiled on your birth are now laughing out loud.

  4. External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Well, my big Linux box just bit it again. Looks like I blew another
    motherboard, and this time it took the power supply with it. So I'm
    once again praying that my hard drives, with their 500GB of downloads,
    survived. Last time I was lucky - maybe I will be again. But I think
    it's time I did something better than trying to get this stuff burnt
    onto DVDs before the box blows up again.

    There are plenty of external USB hard drives out there that should
    do the trick. But are they compatible with Linux? All this talk
    of driver software, one-touch backup buttons, etc. makes these drives
    sound like something that you can't just plug into a Linux box and
    mount. Does anyone have any experience with these units? Do they
    work under Linux, or have they been designed to work under Windows only?

    Any suggestions as to brands, and user stories good or bad, are
    welcome. How about getting an internal drive and one of those
    external enclosures, which presumably have some sort of IDE-to-USB
    adapter in them - is this an option?

    Comments, please - I need the peace of mind that only a good backup
    can give.

    --
    /~\ cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
    \ / I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
    X Top-posted messages will probably be ignored. See RFC1855.
    / \ HTML will DEFINITELY be ignored. Join the ASCII ribbon campaign!


  5. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > There are plenty of external USB hard drives out there that should
    > do the trick. But are they compatible with Linux? All this talk
    > of driver software, one-touch backup buttons, etc. makes these drives
    > sound like something that you can't just plug into a Linux box


    The following devices should be avoided because they are known to enter
    powersave mode after a few minutes and will not wakeup:

    Maxtor Onetouch 4
    Seagate Freeagent

    Regards,

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

  6. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    > There are plenty of external USB hard drives out there that should
    > do the trick. But are they compatible with Linux? All this talk
    > of driver software, one-touch backup buttons, etc. makes these drives
    > sound like something that you can't just plug into a Linux box and
    > mount. Does anyone have any experience with these units? Do they
    > work under Linux, or have they been designed to work under Windows only?


    Most external USB hard drives are standard USB Mass Storage devices.
    The kernels included in almost any modern distribution will support these
    immediately with no extra work. The backup buttons, however, will probably
    not work without extra software.

    I use and recommend rdiff-backup for backups using Linux. It provides
    efficient reverse incremental backups, where the latest version is
    directly accessible (without requiring special software).

    http://www.nongnu.org/rdiff-backup/


  7. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    On 2008-08-20, Baho Utot wrote:
    > Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    >
    >> Well, my big Linux box just bit it again. Looks like I blew another
    >> motherboard, and this time it took the power supply with it. So I'm
    >> once again praying that my hard drives, with their 500GB of downloads,
    >> survived. Last time I was lucky - maybe I will be again. But I think
    >> it's time I did something better than trying to get this stuff burnt
    >> onto DVDs before the box blows up again.
    >>
    >> There are plenty of external USB hard drives out there that should
    >> do the trick. But are they compatible with Linux? All this talk
    >> of driver software, one-touch backup buttons, etc. makes these drives
    >> sound like something that you can't just plug into a Linux box and
    >> mount. Does anyone have any experience with these units? Do they
    >> work under Linux, or have they been designed to work under Windows only?
    >>
    >> Any suggestions as to brands, and user stories good or bad, are
    >> welcome. How about getting an internal drive and one of those
    >> external enclosures, which presumably have some sort of IDE-to-USB
    >> adapter in them - is this an option?
    >>
    >> Comments, please - I need the peace of mind that only a good backup
    >> can give.
    >>

    >
    > I have three external USB drives, I use generic USB case and installed an
    > IDE drive into. No problems what so ever.
    >
    > Now for the already comerical ones I don't know.


    Got a cheap 500G one from Lidl couple of days ago, and am fiddling with it
    to get it to work with Linux. ( I wanted it to try the stonking great file
    to compare md5 password hashes, but discover that it Has Been Done, so am
    now playing with the drive). Some cron process wouold do the backup thing,
    I suppose. Noisy bugger, Targa (which supply Lidl with cheap tat),. 135
    euro.


    --
    Greymaus

  8. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 23:57:54 +0100, Mark Hobley wrote:

    > The following devices should be avoided because they are known to enter
    > powersave mode after a few minutes and will not wakeup:
    >
    > Maxtor Onetouch 4
    > Seagate Freeagent
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Mark.


    I was able to change that behaviour on my Seagate Freeagent drives
    permanently using sdparm. Before changing it, they would wake up, just not
    in time. This caused Linux to think there were FS errors, and would
    therefore remount it read-only.

  9. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 22:57:54 UTC in comp.os.linux.hardware,
    markhobley@hotpop.donottypethisbit.com (Mark Hobley) wrote:

    > Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > > There are plenty of external USB hard drives out there that should
    > > do the trick. But are they compatible with Linux? All this talk
    > > of driver software, one-touch backup buttons, etc. makes these drives
    > > sound like something that you can't just plug into a Linux box

    >
    > The following devices should be avoided because they are known to enter
    > powersave mode after a few minutes and will not wakeup:
    >
    > Maxtor Onetouch 4
    > Seagate Freeagent


    My Seagate Freeagent works OK though I did have to add this to /etc/rc.local

    for f in /sys/class/scsi_disk/*; do echo 1 > $f/allow_restart; done

    That allows the disk to spin back up again once it goes to sleep.

    --
    Trevor Hemsley, Brighton, UK
    Trevor dot Hemsley at ntlworld dot com

  10. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Rikishi 42 wrote:
    > What do you do? Overclock? In 25 years, I never blew a motherboard, never
    > mind a power supply.


    I found that Maxtor hard drives can fail catastrophically taking the
    motherboard, power supply and processor down with them. I have seen this
    on at least three occasions. The drives get roasting hot. Disk errors start to
    occur and eventually the computer goes bang. Repair involves replacement of
    the hard drives, power supply, motherboard and processor.

    Mark.

    --
    Mark Hobley,
    393 Quinton Road West,
    Quinton, BIRMINGHAM.
    B32 1QE.

  11. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Em Quinta, 21 de Agosto de 2008 12:08, Mark Hobley escreveu:

    > Rikishi 42 wrote:
    >> What do you do? Overclock? In 25 years, I never blew a motherboard, never
    >> mind a power supply.

    >
    > I found that Maxtor hard drives can fail catastrophically taking the
    > motherboard, power supply and processor down with them. I have seen this
    > on at least three occasions. The drives get roasting hot. Disk errors
    > start to occur and eventually the computer goes bang. Repair involves
    > replacement of the hard drives, power supply, motherboard and processor.
    >
    > Mark.
    >


    And there is also a lot of poor quality boards out there...

    for example, i have two nephews with identical computers, both have
    P4M800 Pro-M7 boards and these boards have a problem, they overheat the
    memorys DDR2: in hot days, the memory and north chip heats and it starts to
    get memory erros (tested with memtest86)...
    the solution is to manually down the FSB and DRAM frequencies from 266 to
    200Mhz and put a fan pointed to the DIMMs... and in those really hot days,
    keep the tower open.

    pretty crap isn't it?

    regards


  12. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Thanks, everyone, for your comments. I've been doing some googling
    and read horror stories about various units' attempts to make
    themselves Windows-only devices (e.g. Seagate FreeAgent). But
    I went down to the local store and found a very nice enclosure
    (Vantec NexStar CX), which is nothing more than a sleek aluminum
    box containing a SATA-to-USB adapter board. I bought a 500GB SATA
    drive and slid it in, and for $100 I have myself an external USB
    drive with no Windows driver disks, no NTFS pre-formatting, no
    one-touch button to worry about - in other words, everything's
    at too low a level to know or care what OS I'm running.

    Now I just have to wait until my box is back from the shop so I can
    try out my new toy. More news as it happens...

    --
    /~\ cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
    \ / I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
    X Top-posted messages will probably be ignored. See RFC1855.
    / \ HTML will DEFINITELY be ignored. Join the ASCII ribbon campaign!


  13. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    In article , BobT@cs.queensu.ca
    (Bob Tennent) writes:

    > On 22 Aug 08 08:21:10 -0800, Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    >
    >> But I went down to the local store and found a very nice enclosure
    >> (Vantec NexStar CX), which is nothing more than a sleek aluminum box
    >> containing a SATA-to-USB adapter board.

    >
    > Sorry to have to say this now but my one bad experience with USB-to-IDE
    > was with a Vantec enclosure. YMMV.


    Hopefully they're doing better with USB-to-SATA. I'll let you know.
    I'm still waiting for my box to come back from the shop, but in the
    meantime I plugged the unit into my wife's laptop, which is running
    Windows XP. It saw the drive, although since the disk isn't yet
    formatted it didn't assign it a drive letter.

    --
    /~\ cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
    \ / I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
    X Top-posted messages will probably be ignored. See RFC1855.
    / \ HTML will DEFINITELY be ignored. Join the ASCII ribbon campaign!


  14. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    On 2008-08-22, greymaus wrote:

    > I have one problem, turning on the already connected USB-HD gives
    > different devices, sometimes /dev/sdb, sometimes /dev/sdc. I am working
    > towards having it i lilo-startable, but how can one call it when the
    > device name changes on reboot.


    Use the device ID to identify it. Look in /dev/disk/by-id/ and use that
    device in /etc/fstab to give it a consistent mount point:

    /dev/disk/by-id/usb-WDC_WD16_00AABB-00PUA0-0:0-part1 /mnt/backup ext3 users,rw,owner 1 3

    --

    John (john@os2.dhs.org)
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  15. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    In article <1014.191T1708T9255505@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs) writes:

    > In article ,
    > BobT@cs.queensu.ca (Bob Tennent) writes:
    >
    >> On 22 Aug 08 08:21:10 -0800, Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    >>
    >>> But I went down to the local store and found a very nice enclosure
    >>> (Vantec NexStar CX), which is nothing more than a sleek aluminum
    >>> box containing a SATA-to-USB adapter board.

    >>
    >> Sorry to have to say this now but my one bad experience with
    >> USB-to-IDE was with a Vantec enclosure. YMMV.

    >
    > Hopefully they're doing better with USB-to-SATA. I'll let you know.
    > I'm still waiting for my box to come back from the shop, but in the
    > meantime I plugged the unit into my wife's laptop, which is running
    > Windows XP. It saw the drive, although since the disk isn't yet
    > formatted it didn't assign it a drive letter.


    More news. I tried plugging my backup unit into the KnoppMyth box
    in the living room (and had to ssh in from a Windows box because
    the shell's display isn't readable on my TV). I was able to
    partition the drive, make an ext3 filesystem, and copy some
    test files onto the drive. Works just fine.

    So now I have a backup unit - but nothing to back up anymore.
    I tried slipping the two SATA drives into the enclosure in turn.
    They didn't spin up, they didn't respond - but they did smell.
    So it looks as if when my power supply **** itself, it not only
    took out the motherboard and the CPU, but the hard drives as well.
    I've heard stories about finding identical drives and swapping the
    circuit boards. Has anyone tried this? Did it work? If the motor
    gets fried would even this not be enough?

    A bit of googling suggests that the data recovery services that
    do this sort of stuff tend to charge about $500 per drive. That's
    an awful lot for a bunch of MP3s and AVIs (even though we're talking
    an awful lot of MP3s and AVIs). Looks like I've learned a painful
    lesson here, involving not only regular backups but also regular
    vacuuming of computers - since I suspect that it's that dust-clogged
    fan in the power supply that caused the murder/suicide. My 10-year-old
    boxes aren't nearly as fussy...

    --
    /~\ cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
    \ / I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
    X Top-posted messages will probably be ignored. See RFC1855.
    / \ HTML will DEFINITELY be ignored. Join the ASCII ribbon campaign!


  16. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    In article <2444.193T2186T14335559@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > In article <1014.191T1708T9255505@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    > cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs) writes:
    >
    > > In article ,
    > > BobT@cs.queensu.ca (Bob Tennent) writes:
    > >
    > >> On 22 Aug 08 08:21:10 -0800, Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> But I went down to the local store and found a very nice enclosure
    > >>> (Vantec NexStar CX), which is nothing more than a sleek aluminum
    > >>> box containing a SATA-to-USB adapter board.
    > >>
    > >> Sorry to have to say this now but my one bad experience with
    > >> USB-to-IDE was with a Vantec enclosure. YMMV.

    > >
    > > Hopefully they're doing better with USB-to-SATA. I'll let you know.
    > > I'm still waiting for my box to come back from the shop, but in the
    > > meantime I plugged the unit into my wife's laptop, which is running
    > > Windows XP. It saw the drive, although since the disk isn't yet
    > > formatted it didn't assign it a drive letter.

    >
    > More news. I tried plugging my backup unit into the KnoppMyth box
    > in the living room (and had to ssh in from a Windows box because
    > the shell's display isn't readable on my TV).


    Change its typeface to something that _is_ readable. I had to jack up
    PuTTY to something huge to make it legible.

    > I was able to
    > partition the drive, make an ext3 filesystem, and copy some
    > test files onto the drive. Works just fine.
    >
    > So now I have a backup unit - but nothing to back up anymore.
    > I tried slipping the two SATA drives into the enclosure in turn.
    > They didn't spin up, they didn't respond - but they did smell.
    > So it looks as if when my power supply **** itself, it not only
    > took out the motherboard and the CPU, but the hard drives as well.


    Warranty exchange?

    --
    -eben QebWenE01R@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81

    Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity,
    and I'm not sure about the former." -- Albert Einstein

  17. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > In article <1014.191T1708T9255505@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    > cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs) writes:
    >
    >> In article ,
    >> BobT@cs.queensu.ca (Bob Tennent) writes:
    >>
    >>> On 22 Aug 08 08:21:10 -0800, Charlie Gibbs wrote:

    {snip}
    > I tried slipping the two SATA drives into the enclosure in turn.
    > They didn't spin up, they didn't respond - but they did smell.
    > So it looks as if when my power supply **** itself, it not only
    > took out the motherboard and the CPU, but the hard drives as well.
    > I've heard stories about finding identical drives and swapping the
    > circuit boards. Has anyone tried this? Did it work? If the motor
    > gets fried would even this not be enough?


    I've tried it with both IDE and SCSI drives, trying to salvage
    some good drives from a pile of dead ones. I'd swap boards from
    drives with obvious HDA problems (no spin or ping-of-death) to
    ones that just didn't get detected (IDE) or didn't come ready
    (SCSI). ISTR the success rate was about 50%, but I wasn't using
    known-good boards nor was I trying to get data off (I'd reformat
    the ones that worked).

    It might be worth a try, but since the drives give off that
    distinctive fried-electronics aroma *and* don't spin up I'd say
    that they're dead.

    --
    -- Marten Kemp
    (Fix name and ISP to reply)

  18. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    In article <6umao5-jq9.ln1@royalty.mine.nu>, ebenZEROONE@verizon.net
    (Hactar) writes:

    > In article <2444.193T2186T14335559@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    > Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    >
    >> More news. I tried plugging my backup unit into the KnoppMyth box
    >> in the living room (and had to ssh in from a Windows box because
    >> the shell's display isn't readable on my TV).

    >
    > Change its typeface to something that _is_ readable. I had to jack up
    > PuTTY to something huge to make it legible.


    I did a bit of tinkering and managed to get xmms almost readable
    on the TV, although the file requester remained tiny. As for xterm,
    the incantations I've tried so far haven't worked. But the ssh
    solution is a good enough workaround until I get my 46-inch LCD
    and hook it up to the DVI port on the KnoppMyth box.

    >> I was able to partition the drive, make an ext3 filesystem, and
    >> copy some test files onto the drive. Works just fine.
    >>
    >> So now I have a backup unit - but nothing to back up anymore.
    >> I tried slipping the two SATA drives into the enclosure in turn.
    >> They didn't spin up, they didn't respond - but they did smell.
    >> So it looks as if when my power supply **** itself, it not only
    >> took out the motherboard and the CPU, but the hard drives as well.

    >
    > Warranty exchange?


    That's going to get me a new motherboard, I think. This is the
    second motherboard swap in this box - the shop where I got the
    last motherboard back in January (after the previous one blew up,
    leaving the drives intact) was kind enough to send it off for a
    replacement, even though it was the power supply in the original
    box (that I didn't buy there) that melted everything down. As for
    the drives, they're cheap enough to replace - except for the data,
    which no warranty can recover.

    --
    /~\ cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
    \ / I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
    X Top-posted messages will probably be ignored. See RFC1855.
    / \ HTML will DEFINITELY be ignored. Join the ASCII ribbon campaign!


  19. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    In article <2042.194T2442T6926255@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > In article <6umao5-jq9.ln1@royalty.mine.nu>, ebenZEROONE@verizon.net
    > (Hactar) writes:
    >
    > > In article <2444.193T2186T14335559@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    > > Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    > >
    > >> More news. I tried plugging my backup unit into the KnoppMyth box
    > >> in the living room (and had to ssh in from a Windows box because
    > >> the shell's display isn't readable on my TV).

    > >
    > > Change its typeface to something that _is_ readable. I had to jack up
    > > PuTTY to something huge to make it legible.

    >
    > I did a bit of tinkering and managed to get xmms almost readable
    > on the TV, although the file requester remained tiny.


    XMMS is way small, even at double size. The only sorta-cures I know for
    that are dropping the X resolution or something like xmag.

    > As for xterm,
    > the incantations I've tried so far haven't worked. But the ssh
    > solution is a good enough workaround until I get my 46-inch LCD
    > and hook it up to the DVI port on the KnoppMyth box.


    Changing it in ~/.Xdefaults or ~/.Xresources would be semi-permanent, but
    something like

    xterm -fn '-sony-fixed-*-*-*-*-24-*-*-*-*-*-*-*'

    should work this time only. BTW, what terminal emulator do you use?

    > >> I was able to partition the drive, make an ext3 filesystem, and
    > >> copy some test files onto the drive. Works just fine.
    > >>
    > >> So now I have a backup unit - but nothing to back up anymore.
    > >> I tried slipping the two SATA drives into the enclosure in turn.
    > >> They didn't spin up, they didn't respond - but they did smell.
    > >> So it looks as if when my power supply **** itself, it not only
    > >> took out the motherboard and the CPU, but the hard drives as well.

    > >
    > > Warranty exchange?

    >
    > That's going to get me a new motherboard, I think. This is the
    > second motherboard swap in this box - the shop where I got the
    > last motherboard back in January (after the previous one blew up,
    > leaving the drives intact) was kind enough to send it off for a
    > replacement, even though it was the power supply in the original
    > box (that I didn't buy there) that melted everything down. As for
    > the drives, they're cheap enough to replace - except for the data,
    > which no warranty can recover.


    When I was young and foolish, I paid \$$BIGNUM to have a shop recover
    my Mac's HD. Woulda been cheaper and easier had it been a Windows box.

    --
    -eben QebWenE01R@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81

    This message was created using recycled electrons.

  20. Re: External drives - compatible with Linux?

    ebenZEROONE@verizon.net (Hactar) writes:

    > In article <2042.194T2442T6926255@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    > Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    >> In article <6umao5-jq9.ln1@royalty.mine.nu>, ebenZEROONE@verizon.net
    >> (Hactar) writes:
    >>
    >> > In article <2444.193T2186T14335559@kltpzyxm.invalid>,
    >> > Charlie Gibbs wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> More news. I tried plugging my backup unit into the KnoppMyth box
    >> >> in the living room (and had to ssh in from a Windows box because
    >> >> the shell's display isn't readable on my TV).
    >> >
    >> > Change its typeface to something that _is_ readable. I had to jack up
    >> > PuTTY to something huge to make it legible.

    >>
    >> I did a bit of tinkering and managed to get xmms almost readable
    >> on the TV, although the file requester remained tiny.

    >
    > XMMS is way small, even at double size. The only sorta-cures I know for
    > that are dropping the X resolution or something like xmag.


    I'd try changing that and the display area size in xorg.conf, before
    looking for application-dependent fixes.

    >> As for xterm,
    >> the incantations I've tried so far haven't worked. But the ssh
    >> solution is a good enough workaround until I get my 46-inch LCD
    >> and hook it up to the DVI port on the KnoppMyth box.

    >
    > Changing it in ~/.Xdefaults or ~/.Xresources would be semi-permanent, but
    > something like
    >
    > xterm -fn '-sony-fixed-*-*-*-*-24-*-*-*-*-*-*-*'
    >
    > should work this time only. BTW, what terminal emulator do you use?


    At least some xterm versions have three 'context-menus' - Ctrl+ right-button click> raises the font size selection menu. (This is just a
    quick and dirty fix, another one working just for the opened xterm
    window.)

    --
    Nuno J. Silva (aka njsg)
    LEIC student at Instituto Superior T├ęcnico
    Lisbon, Portugal
    Homepage: http://njsg.no.sapo.pt/
    Gopherspace: gopher://sdf-eu.org/1/users/njsg

    -=-=-
    Warning: Objects in mirror appear smarter than they are.

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