Unknown Hardware - Hardware

This is a discussion on Unknown Hardware - Hardware ; I have a problem with installing an old server. I dont know about the exact hardware inside. It is a compaq ProLiant DL320 which is about 5 years old. About everything is working after installing a debian system (v. 2.6.18), ...

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Thread: Unknown Hardware

  1. Unknown Hardware

    I have a problem with installing an old server. I dont know about the
    exact hardware inside. It is a compaq ProLiant DL320 which is about 5
    years old. About everything is working after installing a debian
    system (v. 2.6.18), but the system isnt auto-detecting my ISDN card
    (which is onboard) and I have no clue how to find out about it.

    Thanks for your help

    Philipp

  2. Re: Unknown Hardware

    On Thu, 07 Aug 2008 03:05:33 -0700, Aikanaro wrote:

    > I have a problem with installing an old server. I dont know about the
    > exact hardware inside. It is a compaq ProLiant DL320 which is about 5
    > years old. About everything is working after installing a debian
    > system (v. 2.6.18), but the system isnt auto-detecting my ISDN card
    > (which is onboard) and I have no clue how to find out about it.


    What does lspci give you?
    I'm not sure if hwdetect or discover are any good.

    I believe there is somewhere in the doco/online a list of cryptic numbers
    that can be obtained from these devices (aka they use this number to
    actually identify the device) and if you can find the number in the
    output, it might give you a clue, or a search hint.

    Found any specs online?

    Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?



  3. Re: Unknown Hardware

    On 2008-08-07, terryc hit the keyboard and wrote:
    > On Thu, 07 Aug 2008 03:05:33 -0700, Aikanaro wrote:
    >
    >> I have a problem with installing an old server. I dont know about the
    >> exact hardware inside. It is a compaq ProLiant DL320 which is about 5
    >> years old. About everything is working after installing a debian
    >> system (v. 2.6.18), but the system isnt auto-detecting my ISDN card
    >> (which is onboard) and I have no clue how to find out about it.

    >
    > What does lspci give you?
    > I'm not sure if hwdetect or discover are any good.
    >
    > I believe there is somewhere in the doco/online a list of cryptic numbers
    > that can be obtained from these devices (aka they use this number to
    > actually identify the device) and if you can find the number in the
    > output, it might give you a clue, or a search hint.
    >
    > Found any specs online?
    >
    > Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?


    Network IIRC, it was the next step up from the dial-up modem, faster
    but still slower then a modern NIC. They were/are being used widely
    in Europe. ISDN was also used to give a customer two tel-lines, one
    for phone, the other for fax, it's a while that I actually used any
    of them at my work, so I'm not sure....

    Guess we both can read up about it at our own leisure :-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISDN


    Maybe the OP could stick in a Live-CD like Knoppix to see the
    Hardware. (but 2.6.18 isn't that old) yet Debian needs a lot of
    tweaking, I speak from experience here...

    >
    >




    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    This signature is licensed under the GPL and may be
    freely distributed as long as a copy of the GPL is included... :-)


  4. Re: Unknown Hardware

    > Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?

    internet access maybe??
    i think it is a fact that the entire earth is not yet hooked to fiber or
    wi-fi..

    st

  5. Re: Unknown Hardware

    On 7 Aug., 16:13, DenverD wrote:
    > > Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?

    >
    > internet access maybe??
    > i think it is a fact that the entire earth is not yet hooked to fiber or
    > wi-fi..
    >
    > st


    it is supposed to be used for a faxserver for a small company internet
    is at least broadband... probably even better

    lspci gives the following:

    00:00.0 Host bridge: Broadcom CNB20LE Host Bridge (rev 06)
    00:00.1 Host bridge: Broadcom CNB20LE Host Bridge (rev 06)
    00:02.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc Rage XL (rev
    27)
    00:03.0 System peripheral: Compaq Computer Corporation Advanced System
    Management Controller
    00:0f.0 ISA bridge: Broadcom OSB4 South Bridge (rev 51)
    00:0f.1 IDE interface: Broadcom OSB4 IDE Controller
    00:0f.2 USB Controller: Broadcom OSB4/CSB5 OHCI USB Controller (rev
    04)
    01:03.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82557/8/9 [Ethernet Pro
    100] (rev 08)
    01:04.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82557/8/9 [Ethernet Pro
    100] (rev 08)
    01:05.0 IDE interface: Silicon Image, Inc. SiI 0649 Ultra ATA/100 PCI
    to ATA Host Controller (rev 02)


    I thought about using a life system, but the server hasn't got a dvd
    drive and it wont (for whatever reason) not accept an extern one. And
    sicne we have no life system on cd but only on dvd i woould have to
    bring one withme tomorrow


    Regards, Philipp

  6. Re: Unknown Hardware

    Dragomir Kollaric wrote:

    >> Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?

    >
    > Network IIRC, it was the next step up from the dial-up modem, faster
    > but still slower then a modern NIC. They were/are being used widely
    > in Europe. ISDN was also used to give a customer two tel-lines, one
    > for phone, the other for fax, it's a while that I actually used any
    > of them at my work, so I'm not sure....
    >
    > Guess we both can read up about it at our own leisure :-)
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISDN


    I'm fairly sure he knows what ISDN is, he asked what it is used for.

    You didn't know?

  7. Re: Unknown Hardware

    DenverD wrote:
    >> Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?

    >
    > internet access maybe??
    > i think it is a fact that the entire earth is not yet hooked to fiber or
    > wi-fi..
    >



    Or xDSL?

  8. Re: Unknown Hardware

    On 2008-08-07, Cork Soaker hit the keyboard and wrote:
    > Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    >
    >>> Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?

    >>
    >> Network IIRC, it was the next step up from the dial-up modem, faster
    >> but still slower then a modern NIC. They were/are being used widely
    >> in Europe. ISDN was also used to give a customer two tel-lines, one
    >> for phone, the other for fax, it's a while that I actually used any
    >> of them at my work, so I'm not sure....
    >>
    >> Guess we both can read up about it at our own leisure :-)
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISDN

    >
    > I'm fairly sure he knows what ISDN is, he asked what it is used for.
    >
    > You didn't know?


    I read his question too. Anybody who knows about ISDN knows
    that it was/is used for telephone/fax. I'm not sure if it
    was used outside of Europa that much, but in Germany and
    Austria, (most likely Switzerland too) it was used a lot.
    Some used it for Internet too.. because if you have one
    dial-up line hooked up to the phone it is being blocked
    (you cant receive phone calls), ISDN allowed you to have
    two connection the one for the modem, the other for
    calling/receive calls. This was the use of ISDN I knew of.

    I posted the link, because I'm not in the habit to read a
    site, and then copy and paste the information into the post,
    if the person *asking* for the information can do the same.

    Maybe ISDN is still being used for phone/fax, (I don't know
    anybody who does this for private or business use) but less
    for Internet these days.



    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    This signature is licensed under the GPL and may be
    freely distributed as long as a copy of the GPL is included... :-)


  9. Re: Unknown Hardware

    On Fri, 08 Aug 2008 12:13:29 +0200, Dragomir Kollaric wrote:

    > I posted the link, because I'm not in the habit to read a
    > site, and then copy and paste the information into the post,
    > if the person *asking* for the information can do the same.


    Yes, I did know, but it was helpful to remind the brain about Bri/Pri etc

    I was also being a bit Australian centric when I asked as AFAIK, it has
    mostly disappeared from its major uses here.

    I stand to be corrected, but in Australia ISDN could be considered rare as
    it carried a high cost in setup charges, ongoing fees and hardware
    items. So its main use was in a step upfrom DATEL lines (9600 baud anyone)

    Many ISPs found it cheaper to have a setup similar
    to Pc/computer with stallion/bocca card fanning out to 16 modems on 16+
    seperately installed telephone lines. This was definitely the setup in BBS
    times.

    My own SOHO had five seperate lines for voice, fax & 3 X modem (BBS).

    However, it changed during the 80's when our national telco reduced
    certain charges and some ISP installed BRIs of 30 lines. At that
    time , customers were all dialup.

    I didn't have a lot to do with it in business, except reading the
    flashing lights to Telcos service centre when it stopped working. About
    the time I last had to worry about these things, in the city, they were
    rolling out fibre to replace the copper back to the exchange.

    I believe it survives here in remote places, aka you can still get it
    installed for home use if your site meets certain eclectic requirements.
    Although I believe our telco has a distinct preference for satellite
    services.

    Hopefully someone in business networkng in Australia might through is some
    more up to date knowledge of current use.






    some places where ADSL

    i believeWe did and I
    > Maybe ISDN is still being used for phone/fax, (I don't know
    > anybody who does this for private or business use) but less for
    > Internet these days.
    >
    >
    >
    > Dragomir Kollaric



  10. Re: Unknown Hardware

    Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    > On 2008-08-07, Cork Soaker hit the keyboard and wrote:
    >> Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?
    >>> Network IIRC, it was the next step up from the dial-up modem, faster
    >>> but still slower then a modern NIC. They were/are being used widely
    >>> in Europe. ISDN was also used to give a customer two tel-lines, one
    >>> for phone, the other for fax, it's a while that I actually used any
    >>> of them at my work, so I'm not sure....
    >>>
    >>> Guess we both can read up about it at our own leisure :-)
    >>>
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISDN

    >> I'm fairly sure he knows what ISDN is, he asked what it is used for.
    >>
    >> You didn't know?

    >
    > I read his question too. Anybody who knows about ISDN knows
    > that it was/is used for telephone/fax. I'm not sure if it
    > was used outside of Europa that much, but in Germany and
    > Austria, (most likely Switzerland too) it was used a lot.
    > Some used it for Internet too.. because if you have one
    > dial-up line hooked up to the phone it is being blocked
    > (you cant receive phone calls), ISDN allowed you to have
    > two connection the one for the modem, the other for
    > calling/receive calls. This was the use of ISDN I knew of.
    >
    > I posted the link, because I'm not in the habit to read a
    > site, and then copy and paste the information into the post,
    > if the person *asking* for the information can do the same.
    >
    > Maybe ISDN is still being used for phone/fax, (I don't know
    > anybody who does this for private or business use) but less
    > for Internet these days.


    I know a company that still uses painfully slow ISDN for their ISP, but
    the guy who makes the decisions is a complete moron. They can have ADSL
    cheaper and much faster, but as I said....

  11. Re: Unknown Hardware



    On Fri, 8 Aug 2008, Dragomir Kollaric wrote:

    > On 2008-08-07, Cork Soaker hit the keyboard and wrote:
    >> Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?
    >>>
    >>> Network IIRC, it was the next step up from the dial-up modem, faster
    >>> but still slower then a modern NIC. They were/are being used widely
    >>> in Europe. ISDN was also used to give a customer two tel-lines, one
    >>> for phone, the other for fax, it's a while that I actually used any
    >>> of them at my work, so I'm not sure....
    >>>
    >>> Guess we both can read up about it at our own leisure :-)
    >>>
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISDN

    >>
    >> I'm fairly sure he knows what ISDN is, he asked what it is used for.
    >>
    >> You didn't know?

    >
    > I read his question too. Anybody who knows about ISDN knows
    > that it was/is used for telephone/fax. I'm not sure if it
    > was used outside of Europa that much, but in Germany and
    > Austria, (most likely Switzerland too) it was used a lot.
    > Some used it for Internet too.. because if you have one
    > dial-up line hooked up to the phone it is being blocked
    > (you cant receive phone calls), ISDN allowed you to have
    > two connection the one for the modem, the other for
    > calling/receive calls. This was the use of ISDN I knew of.


    One of my prior employers (large European company) used ISDN extensively
    for videoconferencing.


  12. Re: Unknown Hardware

    Whoever wrote:
    >
    >
    > On Fri, 8 Aug 2008, Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    >
    >> On 2008-08-07, Cork Soaker hit the keyboard and wrote:
    >>> Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?
    >>>>
    >>>> Network IIRC, it was the next step up from the dial-up modem, faster
    >>>> but still slower then a modern NIC. They were/are being used widely
    >>>> in Europe. ISDN was also used to give a customer two tel-lines, one
    >>>> for phone, the other for fax, it's a while that I actually used any
    >>>> of them at my work, so I'm not sure....
    >>>>
    >>>> Guess we both can read up about it at our own leisure :-)
    >>>>
    >>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISDN
    >>>
    >>> I'm fairly sure he knows what ISDN is, he asked what it is used for.
    >>>
    >>> You didn't know?

    >>
    >> I read his question too. Anybody who knows about ISDN knows
    >> that it was/is used for telephone/fax. I'm not sure if it
    >> was used outside of Europa that much, but in Germany and
    >> Austria, (most likely Switzerland too) it was used a lot.
    >> Some used it for Internet too.. because if you have one
    >> dial-up line hooked up to the phone it is being blocked
    >> (you cant receive phone calls), ISDN allowed you to have
    >> two connection the one for the modem, the other for
    >> calling/receive calls. This was the use of ISDN I knew of.

    >
    > One of my prior employers (large European company) used ISDN extensively
    > for videoconferencing.
    >


    ACTUALLY, now you mention it. My major American company based in the
    North-East of England whose name I shall not remember, did exactly the same.

    But this was long before broadband. ;-)

    It was the best air-conditioned room in the house!

  13. Re: Unknown Hardware

    On 2008-08-08, Cork Soaker hit the keyboard and wrote:
    > Whoever wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> On Fri, 8 Aug 2008, Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2008-08-07, Cork Soaker hit the keyboard and wrote:
    >>>> Dragomir Kollaric wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Curiosity, what is the ISDN used for?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Network IIRC, it was the next step up from the dial-up modem, faster
    >>>>> but still slower then a modern NIC. They were/are being used widely
    >>>>> in Europe. ISDN was also used to give a customer two tel-lines, one
    >>>>> for phone, the other for fax, it's a while that I actually used any
    >>>>> of them at my work, so I'm not sure....
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Guess we both can read up about it at our own leisure :-)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISDN
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm fairly sure he knows what ISDN is, he asked what it is used for.
    >>>>
    >>>> You didn't know?
    >>>
    >>> I read his question too. Anybody who knows about ISDN knows
    >>> that it was/is used for telephone/fax. I'm not sure if it
    >>> was used outside of Europa that much, but in Germany and
    >>> Austria, (most likely Switzerland too) it was used a lot.
    >>> Some used it for Internet too.. because if you have one
    >>> dial-up line hooked up to the phone it is being blocked
    >>> (you cant receive phone calls), ISDN allowed you to have
    >>> two connection the one for the modem, the other for
    >>> calling/receive calls. This was the use of ISDN I knew of.

    >>
    >> One of my prior employers (large European company) used ISDN extensively
    >> for videoconferencing.



    Never heard about that, but I wasn't really looking into it
    deeply, when it hit the market the *LITTLE* information I
    had stored away in my brain, came from small articles in
    news-papers dealing with the phone/fax side of it.

    I was toying with the idea for a while, but then when
    a cable company offered a 3 part package (phone, TV,
    broad-band Internet) I took up their offer, and never looked
    back. I could see how slow modem were. As to ASDL, I've
    heard about that too, but again I didn't spend much time
    researching it. At the place I work we too use broad-band,
    as this is the *way* to go...

    >>

    >
    > ACTUALLY, now you mention it. My major American company based in the
    > North-East of England whose name I shall not remember, did exactly the same.
    >
    > But this was long before broadband. ;-)
    >
    > It was the best air-conditioned room in the house!


    I can imagine :-)



    Dragomir Kollaric
    --
    This signature is licensed under the GPL and may be
    freely distributed as long as a copy of the GPL is included... :-)


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