DVD / DVD+R /DVD-R / DVDRW. Are they all really distinct media formats? - Hardware

This is a discussion on DVD / DVD+R /DVD-R / DVDRW. Are they all really distinct media formats? - Hardware ; I'm always confused by DVD terminology when buying media to write on. There's DVD / DVD+R / DVD-R / DVDRW and I'm not even sure which more! Are these all really distinct technologies and formats? Or are some subsets / ...

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Thread: DVD / DVD+R /DVD-R / DVDRW. Are they all really distinct media formats?

  1. DVD / DVD+R /DVD-R / DVDRW. Are they all really distinct media formats?

    I'm always confused by DVD terminology when buying media to write on.
    There's DVD / DVD+R / DVD-R / DVDRW and I'm not even sure which more!

    Are these all really distinct technologies and formats? Or are some subsets
    / supersets of others? Or maybe its only backward compatibility issues?
    What's the best way to figure out what format my Laptop supports? Do they
    have varied sizes? Does it matter whether I'm writing data or movies etc.?
    I faintly remember there being lead-in / lead-out issues....

    I've never faced the problem that I bought some commercial movie etc. on a
    DVD and my Dell Laptop ( Inspirion E1505)'s inbuilt DVD reader /writer
    couldn't read it. Its a dual boot so are there any Linux-vs-Win issues
    too?

    Are these distinctions only relevant when writing disks at home as opposed
    to commercially stamped disks? Or maybe when reading on hardware other than
    "computers" (etc. DVD players etc.)


    Just looking for some tips to lead me out of this technology morass.

    --
    Rahul

  2. Re: DVD / DVD+R /DVD-R / DVDRW. Are they all really distinct media formats?

    On 2008-07-06, Rahul wrote:

    > I'm always confused by DVD terminology when buying media to write on.
    > There's DVD / DVD+R / DVD-R / DVDRW and I'm not even sure which more!
    > Are these all really distinct technologies and formats? Or are some

    subsets
    > / supersets of others? Or maybe its only backward compatibility issues?


    1. DVD is a bit generic, not very precise. But you would probably use it for
    commercial video-DVD's. Video-DVD has a specific format/organisation, but
    can be written to DVD+r, DVD-R and DVD RW. A bit like you can buy audio CD's
    and write your own audio CD on a CD-ROM disc.

    2. DVD-r. The latter is a 'in-between' format, taking elements from CD's and
    DVD's. It's less reliable, is slower to write, less standard.

    3. DVD+r. The 'standard' DVD, writes faster then DVD-r, is more reliable.

    4. DVD-RW. Much like the CD-RW, you can re-write it. Usually a bit slower.


    > What's the best way to figure out what format my Laptop supports? Do they
    > have varied sizes? Does it matter whether I'm writing data or movies etc.?
    > I faintly remember there being lead-in / lead-out issues....


    In reading, any DVD reader should be able to read discs that are DVD-r and
    DVD-RW. Today's writers should be able to write all, too. some older ones
    could not use DVD+r.


    > I've never faced the problem that I bought some commercial movie etc. on a
    > DVD and my Dell Laptop ( Inspirion E1505)'s inbuilt DVD reader /writer
    > couldn't read it. Its a dual boot so are there any Linux-vs-Win issues
    > too?


    Reading a commercial disc won't be a problem, you drive can do it. Reading
    the movie on the disc is another matter. You need a video-DVD player
    software. They exist for both Windows and Linux, of course.


    > Are these distinctions only relevant when writing disks at home as opposed
    > to commercially stamped disks? Or maybe when reading on hardware other
    > than "computers" (etc. DVD players etc.)


    Recent computers should be able to rad them all.
    Home DVD players can read commercial disks, and usually DVD-r and DVD+r. The
    support of DVD-RW is not universal.


    > Just looking for some tips to lead me out of this technology morass.


    If you want to write a normal, permanent DVD, buy DVD+r. If you want to be
    able to er-write (usefull for tests), buy DVD-RW.

    With both of these discs, you can create a data-DVD or a video-DVD.


    --
    The sand remembers once there was beach and sunshine
    but chip is warm too
    -- haiku from Effector Online, Volume 1, Number 6

  3. Re: DVD / DVD+R /DVD-R / DVDRW. Are they all really distinct media formats?

    I demand that Rikishi 42 may or may not have written...

    > On 2008-07-06, Rahul wrote:
    >> I'm always confused by DVD terminology when buying media to write on.
    >> There's DVD / DVD+R / DVD-R / DVDRW and I'm not even sure which more! Are
    >> these all really distinct technologies and formats? Or are some subsets /
    >> supersets of others? Or maybe its only backward compatibility issues?


    > 1. DVD is a bit generic, not very precise. But you would probably use it
    > for commercial video-DVD's. Video-DVD has a specific format/organisation,
    > but can be written to DVD+r, DVD-R and DVD RW. A bit like you can buy audio
    > CD's and write your own audio CD on a CD-ROM disc.
    >
    > 2. DVD-r. The latter is a 'in-between' format, taking elements from CD's
    > and DVD's. It's less reliable, is slower to write, less standard.
    >
    > 3. DVD+r. The 'standard' DVD, writes faster then DVD-r, is more reliable.
    >
    > 4. DVD-RW. Much like the CD-RW, you can re-write it. Usually a bit slower.


    I've had problems with DVD-RW, but that was a few years ago and I've not
    touched DVD-* since.

    5. DVD+RW. Doesn't need to be blanked before rewriting; is good for random
    access (packet writing).

    6. DVD+R DL (dual layer).

    I have one drive (read-only) which won't recognise these (at least the ones
    that I've tried); a writer which has problems at around the layer-change
    point (at least when reading back); and a laptop DVD drive which has no
    problems whatsoever with what I've tested.

    >> What's the best way to figure out what format my Laptop supports? Do they
    >> have varied sizes? Does it matter whether I'm writing data or movies
    >> etc.? I faintly remember there being lead-in / lead-out issues....


    > In reading, any DVD reader should be able to read discs that are DVD-r and
    > DVD-RW. Today's writers should be able to write all, too. some older ones
    > could not use DVD+r.


    Anything made within the last few years should cope with +R, +RW, +R DL, -R,
    -RW. Probably -RAM too.

    The contents of /proc/sys/dev/cdrom/info may help, but it's not exhaustive.

    >> I've never faced the problem that I bought some commercial movie etc. on
    >> a DVD and my Dell Laptop ( Inspirion E1505)'s inbuilt DVD reader /writer
    >> couldn't read it. Its a dual boot so are there any Linux-vs-Win issues
    >> too?


    > Reading a commercial disc won't be a problem, you drive can do it. Reading
    > the movie on the disc is another matter. You need a video-DVD player
    > software. They exist for both Windows and Linux, of course.


    regionset and libdvdcss2 help here. If you can, set the drive to region-free
    (regionset allows 0 despite asking for a number between 1 and 8); else set it
    to the correct region for your location.

    >> Are these distinctions only relevant when writing disks at home as
    >> opposed to commercially stamped disks? Or maybe when reading on hardware
    >> other than "computers" (etc. DVD players etc.)


    > Recent computers should be able to rad them all. Home DVD players can read
    > commercial disks, and usually DVD-r and DVD+r. The support of DVD-RW is not
    > universal.


    DVD+RW should be fine. As always, careful handling helps; I'm seeing
    roughly-handled discs failing early...

    [snip]
    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    | + Use more efficient products. Use less. BE MORE ENERGY EFFICIENT.

    I'm not nearly as think as you confused I am.

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