motherboard for debian etch - Hardware

This is a discussion on motherboard for debian etch - Hardware ; Hello, I need some help to buy 1 mother board (intel dual core) for debian etch Thanks a lot -- ra...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: motherboard for debian etch

  1. motherboard for debian etch

    Hello,

    I need some help to buy 1 mother board (intel dual core) for debian etch

    Thanks a lot

    --
    ra

  2. Re: motherboard for debian etch

    Ramon wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I need some help to buy 1 mother board (intel dual core) for debian etch
    >
    > Thanks a lot


    There isn't much that we can help you with, I'm afraid. We don't know
    what's appropriate for your budget and what plug-in hardware you will be
    using. Google is your friend. ;-)

    What I can tell you is that if you plan on not using wireless LAN and if you
    already have a plug-in video adapter card (or you have one in mind), then
    anything with an nVidia nForce chipset will do fine.

    If you do need wireless LAN, then anything with an Orinoco, Atheros or Intel
    chipset will work out of the box. Intel graphics chips also work out of
    the box, and so if you find a motherboard with all Intel chips, you should
    be fine. Intel offers all of its drivers as Open Source code.

    Lastly, there are many motherboard manufacturers, and many choices of
    chipsets for each of them, but if you're looking for quality, then I
    recommend Gigabyte, MSI, Asus, Iwill, Tyan or even Intel.

    All depends on your taste and budget. ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  3. Re: motherboard for debian etch

    Le Wed, 04 Jun 2008 12:36:16 +0200,
    Dans le forum comp.os.linux.hardware,
    Aragorn wrotes :

    > If you do need wireless LAN, then anything with an Orinoco, Atheros or Intel
    > chipset will work out of the box. Intel graphics chips also work out of
    > the box, and so if you find a motherboard with all Intel chips, you should
    > be fine. Intel offers all of its drivers as Open Source code.


    Thank you. I have made up my mind for Asus P5KC

    > Lastly, there are many motherboard manufacturers, and many choices of
    > chipsets for each of them, but if you're looking for quality, then I
    > recommend Gigabyte, MSI, Asus, Iwill, Tyan or even Intel.


    Because of great matter of RAM with linux, is it better to install ddr
    3 instead of ddr 2 ?

    --
    ra

  4. Re: motherboard for debian etch

    Ramon wrote:

    >> Lastly, there are many motherboard manufacturers, and many choices of
    >> chipsets for each of them, but if you're looking for quality, then I
    >> recommend Gigabyte, MSI, Asus, Iwill, Tyan or even Intel.

    >
    > Because of great matter of RAM with linux, is it better to install ddr
    > 3 instead of ddr 2 ?


    In my opinion, the DDR-3 hype is exactly that: a hype. There are many more
    things involved in the actual machine's speed than just the clock frequency
    of the processor, the cache, the memory bus, the motherboard, etc.

    What people generally don't realize is that memory modules designed for
    higher clock frequencies will also have higher latency times, which
    eventually make the difference between the "slower" memory type and the
    "faster" memory type quite small.

    I can understand that someone wanting to install Vista would go for the
    absolutely fastest machine on the planet, given the performance reports,
    but I am happily typing this message on an old Athlon XP 2800+ (2 GHz) that
    still has 333 MHz first-generation DDR memory, and this machine is fairly
    fast.

    If you want my advice, compare the specs of the memory modules, especially
    with regard to latency times, and then see how that compares in their
    price.

    I've recently compiled a Xen(0)-patched Linux kernel on my twin dualcore
    Opteron machine with DDR-2. It took me 50 seconds for the entire build.
    Downloading the Xen source code and the Xen tools source code, building and
    installing it took no longer than five minutes - I didn't actually time it,
    but it was *very* fast. ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

+ Reply to Thread