asrock mobo - raid sata disks - Hardware

This is a discussion on asrock mobo - raid sata disks - Hardware ; I have an asrock k7upgrade-600 mobo and wanted to install a debian distro on 2 sata disks connected in raid-1 mode. I see that this mobo lets define raid arrays, but when installing linux the array is not recognised, installation ...

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  1. asrock mobo - raid sata disks

    I have an asrock k7upgrade-600 mobo and wanted to install a debian
    distro on 2 sata disks connected in raid-1 mode.
    I see that this mobo lets define raid arrays, but when installing linux
    the array is not recognised, installation sees the 2 disks separated and
    if i install on one of them, the other remains empty, no raid-1 is
    performed.
    Perhaps i need a linux module? A mobo bios upgrade or something else?
    Tia and any help appreciated.

    --
    "I am your automatic lover..."

    Roy Batty

  2. Re: asrock mobo - raid sata disks

    BJB wrote:

    > I have an asrock k7upgrade-600 mobo and wanted to install a debian
    > distro on 2 sata disks connected in raid-1 mode.
    > I see that this mobo lets define raid arrays, but when installing linux
    > the array is not recognised, installation sees the 2 disks separated and
    > if i install on one of them, the other remains empty, no raid-1 is
    > performed.
    > Perhaps i need a linux module? A mobo bios upgrade or something else?
    > Tia and any help appreciated.


    Nearly all SATA RAID functionality available directly from the motherboard
    is in fact a low-budget hardware-assisted software RAID solution.

    It is best to disable the RAID features of your SATA controller in the BIOS
    set-up and use the disks as plain SATA disks. You can then set up a
    software RAID via the Linux RAID tools.

    Most distributions support this, but bear in mind that if you want to have
    the root and */boot* filesystems on a software RAID, you'll need to boot
    with an /initrd/ or /initramfs/ that has the appropriate modules available
    already at boot time, before the on-disk root filesystem is mounted.

    If you stick to the distribution's stock kernel, you /should/ be fine - just
    about every binary distribution boots their kernel with an initial ramdisk
    - but should you ever decide to build your own kernel, then you'll have to
    remember to create a suitable /initrd/ or /initramfs/ to go with it, or at
    least, if you want your root filesystem to be RAIDed.

    Hope this was helpful... ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  3. Re: asrock mobo - raid sata disks

    Aragorn wrote:
    > BJB wrote:


    Thanks a lot for your reply;

    >> I have an asrock k7upgrade-600 mobo and wanted to install a debian
    >> distro on 2 sata disks connected in raid-1 mode.
    >> I see that this mobo lets define raid arrays, but when installing linux
    >> the array is not recognised, installation sees the 2 disks separated and
    >> if i install on one of them, the other remains empty, no raid-1 is
    >> performed.

    ....
    > Nearly all SATA RAID functionality available directly from the motherboard
    > is in fact a low-budget hardware-assisted software RAID solution.


    i just suspected that, if one thinks how much the real-hardware raid
    solution cost....

    > It is best to disable the RAID features of your SATA controller in the BIOS
    > set-up and use the disks as plain SATA disks. You can then set up a
    > software RAID via the Linux RAID tools.
    > Most distributions support this, but bear in mind that if you want to have
    > the root and */boot* filesystems on a software RAID, you'll need to boot
    > with an /initrd/ or /initramfs/ that has the appropriate modules available
    > already at boot time, before the on-disk root filesystem is mounted.


    yes, i guess this is *the* problem, apart from trusting the software
    solution....

    > If you stick to the distribution's stock kernel, you /should/ be fine - just
    > about every binary distribution boots their kernel with an initial ramdisk
    > - but should you ever decide to build your own kernel, then you'll have to
    > remember to create a suitable /initrd/ or /initramfs/ to go with it, or at
    > least, if you want your root filesystem to be RAIDed.


    now i have just one doubt at the moment: normal hardware raid-1 solution
    make so that you will end up with 2 twin disks, you can disconnect one,
    connect alone and it works perfectly; do the same happen with a
    linux-software raid-1 solution?

    --
    "I am your automatic lover..."

    Roy Batty

  4. Re: asrock mobo - raid sata disks

    BJB wrote:

    > Aragorn wrote:
    >> BJB wrote:

    >
    > Thanks a lot for your reply;
    >
    >>> I have an asrock k7upgrade-600 mobo and wanted to install a debian
    >>> distro on 2 sata disks connected in raid-1 mode.
    >>> I see that this mobo lets define raid arrays, but when installing linux
    >>> the array is not recognised, installation sees the 2 disks separated and
    >>> if i install on one of them, the other remains empty, no raid-1 is
    >>> performed.

    > ...
    >> Nearly all SATA RAID functionality available directly from the
    >> motherboard is in fact a low-budget hardware-assisted software RAID
    >> solution.

    >
    > i just suspected that, if one thinks how much the real-hardware raid
    > solution cost....


    Oh, you don't have to tell *me.* :-) I've got two systems with hardware
    RAID here; one with an Ultra 320 SCSI adapter and two 73 GB 10k Hitachi
    disks in RAID 1, and one with an SAS adapter and four 147 GB 15k Hitachi
    disks in RAID 5... ;-)

    >> It is best to disable the RAID features of your SATA controller in the
    >> BIOS set-up and use the disks as plain SATA disks. You can then set up a
    >> software RAID via the Linux RAID tools.
    >>
    >> Most distributions support this, but bear in mind that if you want to
    >> have the root and */boot* filesystems on a software RAID, you'll need to
    >> boot with an /initrd/ or /initramfs/ that has the appropriate modules
    >> available already at boot time, before the on-disk root filesystem is
    >> mounted.

    >
    > yes, i guess this is *the* problem, apart from trusting the software
    > solution....


    Linux software RAID 0 and 1 are quite reliable, including the use of
    hotspare disks.

    >> If you stick to the distribution's stock kernel, you /should/ be fine -
    >> just about every binary distribution boots their kernel with an initial
    >> ramdisk - but should you ever decide to build your own kernel, then
    >> you'll have to remember to create a suitable /initrd/ or /initramfs/ to
    >> go with it, or at least, if you want your root filesystem to be RAIDed.

    >
    > now i have just one doubt at the moment: normal hardware raid-1 solution
    > make so that you will end up with 2 twin disks, you can disconnect one,
    > connect alone and it works perfectly; do the same happen with a
    > linux-software raid-1 solution?


    If you disconnect one disk from the array, the array will signal that it
    runs in "degraded mode", just like with a hardware RAID. If there is a hot
    spare disk, the array will rebuild itself using the hot spare. ;-)

    Just read the documentation on Linux Software RAID on...

    http://www.tldp.org

    .... or check out the /man/ page on /mdadm./ ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  5. Re: asrock mobo - raid sata disks

    Aragorn wrote:
    ....
    > Linux software RAID 0 and 1 are quite reliable, including the use of
    > hotspare disks.

    .....
    > If you disconnect one disk from the array, the array will signal that it
    > runs in "degraded mode", just like with a hardware RAID. If there is a hot
    > spare disk, the array will rebuild itself using the hot spare. ;-)
    >
    > Just read the documentation on Linux Software RAID on...
    >
    > http://www.tldp.org
    >
    > ... or check out the /man/ page on /mdadm./ ;-)
    >


    Again thanks for the reply.

    This line seems to be interesting to follow.

    --
    "I am your automatic lover..."

    Roy Batty

  6. Re: asrock mobo - raid sata disks

    BJB wrote:

    > Aragorn wrote:
    > ...
    >> Linux software RAID 0 and 1 are quite reliable, including the use of
    >> hotspare disks.

    > ....
    >> If you disconnect one disk from the array, the array will signal that it
    >> runs in "degraded mode", just like with a hardware RAID. If there is a
    >> hot spare disk, the array will rebuild itself using the hot spare. ;-)
    >>
    >> Just read the documentation on Linux Software RAID on...
    >>
    >> http://www.tldp.org
    >>
    >> ... or check out the /man/ page on /mdadm./ ;-)

    >
    > Again thanks for the reply.


    No problem - that's what we're here for. ;-)

    > This line seems to be interesting to follow.


    It might also be worth mentioning that I am running a small IRC network with
    a few friends, and that our main IRC server is an AMD Phenom X4 machine
    with an nForce chipset, with two SATA disks in a Linux RAID 1
    configuration.

    I did not install the operating system on that machine myself - CentOS 5.1 -
    or set up the RAID, but apparently it was set up by my colleague with a
    partitioning layout similar to what I would have done, and with all
    partitions being mirrored. Just to show you that it works perfectly
    well. ;-)

    The only thing that was still rather experimental a while ago - although I
    haven't exactly checked its progress in the meantime - is software RAID 6
    support in the Linux kernel. RAID 0, 1, 5, 10 and 50 all work very well,
    as does the linear approach of Logical Volume Management. ;-)

    Hey, this is a Real Operating System (TM), not some braindead preliminary
    alpha idea released as a production-ready business platform from that place
    in Redmond. ;-)

    P.S.: In the event that the /mdadm/ utility is not installed on your system
    at this stage, you should get the /raidtools/ package. The RAID support
    itself is already configured into most distribution kernels as loadable
    modules, but you'll need the /raidtools/ package to have the system read
    and properly execute the instructions in */etc/raidtab* - it's a file
    similar to */etc/inittab,* but specifically pertaining to your RAID
    configuration, and it's read at boot time.

    Good luck! ;-)

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

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