command to spin down ide drives - Hardware

This is a discussion on command to spin down ide drives - Hardware ; Hi, should I look deeper into the hdparm to spin down drives etc ? thank you...

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  1. command to spin down ide drives

    Hi,

    should I look deeper into the hdparm to spin down drives etc ?


    thank you



  2. Re: command to spin down ide drives

    On 2007-10-22, =SERGE= wrote:
    > should I look deeper into the hdparm to spin down drives etc ?

    Deeper than what? There is only one depth to it.

    This is what you need:
    hdparm -S 180 /dev/hda

    That sets timeout to 15 min.


    For details, 'man hdparm'.


    --
    There is an art, it says, or rather, a knack to flying.
    The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.
    Douglas Adams

  3. Re: command to spin down ide drives

    Rikishi 42 staggered into the Black Sun and said:
    > On 2007-10-22, =SERGE= wrote:
    >> should I look deeper into the hdparm to spin down drives etc ?

    > Deeper than what? There is only one depth to it.
    > hdparm -S 180 /dev/hda
    > That sets timeout to 15 min. For details, 'man hdparm'.


    ....just remember that if a process wants to read from or write to a
    disk, the disk subsystem will issue a spin-up command. Since there are
    always processes reading from and writing to / and /var (syslog, various
    daemons) then your /var disk will either be spinning constantly, or
    jumping back and forth between spinning and not spinning. The first
    case is better for long-term disk life even if it consumes slightly more
    power. It should be easier to spin down disks that are not part of the
    core system (not / , /var , /usr , or /home) and have them stay spun
    down.

    --
    ROBERT: So how do we get the pig to stop running around?
    TRIANGLE: I think we'll have to rely on the staple gun once again.
    --Triangle & Robert
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see

  4. Re: command to spin down ide drives

    Thank you for your reply....

    My idea is to setup a server where files (music or films for instance) would
    be stored on large disks
    which would work only when addressed otherwise they would be down and not
    turning.Thus the server could be up but not the disks which could last
    longer.

    In short kind of an ide hot swap system.

    What do you think?



    "Dances With Crows" wrote in message
    news:slrnfhptqs.ogl.danSPANceswithTRAPcrows@crow20 2.dyndns.org...
    > Rikishi 42 staggered into the Black Sun and said:
    >> On 2007-10-22, =SERGE= wrote:
    >>> should I look deeper into the hdparm to spin down drives etc ?

    >> Deeper than what? There is only one depth to it.
    >> hdparm -S 180 /dev/hda
    >> That sets timeout to 15 min. For details, 'man hdparm'.

    >
    > ...just remember that if a process wants to read from or write to a
    > disk, the disk subsystem will issue a spin-up command. Since there are
    > always processes reading from and writing to / and /var (syslog, various
    > daemons) then your /var disk will either be spinning constantly, or
    > jumping back and forth between spinning and not spinning. The first
    > case is better for long-term disk life even if it consumes slightly more
    > power. It should be easier to spin down disks that are not part of the
    > core system (not / , /var , /usr , or /home) and have them stay spun
    > down.
    >
    > --
    > ROBERT: So how do we get the pig to stop running around?
    > TRIANGLE: I think we'll have to rely on the staple gun once again.
    > --Triangle & Robert
    > Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to
    > see




  5. Re: command to spin down ide drives

    On 2007-11-04, =SERGE= wrote:
    > Thank you for your reply....
    >
    > My idea is to setup a server where files (music or films for instance) would
    > be stored on large disks
    > which would work only when addressed otherwise they would be down and not
    > turning.Thus the server could be up but not the disks which could last
    > longer.
    >
    > In short kind of an ide hot swap system.
    >
    > What do you think?


    I think you should stop topposting...




    Spinning down the disks of a server is a good idea, but only if it's used
    infrequently.

    Let's put it this way, stopping/starting your disks is going to ware them
    out faster. But you do reduce power and noise.

    So, set the timeout at a long enought time. Say, 1 or 2 hours.
    That way, they will spin down during those periods of the day, where they
    tipically aren't used.


    >
    >
    >
    > "Dances With Crows" wrote in message
    > news:slrnfhptqs.ogl.danSPANceswithTRAPcrows@crow20 2.dyndns.org...
    >> Rikishi 42 staggered into the Black Sun and said:
    >>> On 2007-10-22, =SERGE= wrote:
    >>>> should I look deeper into the hdparm to spin down drives etc ?
    >>> Deeper than what? There is only one depth to it.
    >>> hdparm -S 180 /dev/hda
    >>> That sets timeout to 15 min. For details, 'man hdparm'.

    >>
    >> ...just remember that if a process wants to read from or write to a
    >> disk, the disk subsystem will issue a spin-up command. Since there are
    >> always processes reading from and writing to / and /var (syslog, various
    >> daemons) then your /var disk will either be spinning constantly, or
    >> jumping back and forth between spinning and not spinning. The first
    >> case is better for long-term disk life even if it consumes slightly more
    >> power. It should be easier to spin down disks that are not part of the
    >> core system (not / , /var , /usr , or /home) and have them stay spun
    >> down.
    >>
    >> --
    >> ROBERT: So how do we get the pig to stop running around?
    >> TRIANGLE: I think we'll have to rely on the staple gun once again.
    >> --Triangle & Robert
    >> Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to
    >> see

    >
    >



    --
    There is an art, it says, or rather, a knack to flying.
    The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.
    Douglas Adams

  6. Re: command to spin down ide drives

    What is "infrequently"? every day is frequently? or not?
    "Rikishi 42" wrote in message
    news:cfo105-g0b.ln1@whisper.very.softly...
    > On 2007-11-04, =SERGE= wrote:
    >> Thank you for your reply....
    >>
    >> My idea is to setup a server where files (music or films for instance)
    >> would
    >> be stored on large disks
    >> which would work only when addressed otherwise they would be down and not
    >> turning.Thus the server could be up but not the disks which could last
    >> longer.
    >>
    >> In short kind of an ide hot swap system.
    >>
    >> What do you think?

    >
    > I think you should stop topposting...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Spinning down the disks of a server is a good idea, but only if it's used
    > infrequently.
    >
    > Let's put it this way, stopping/starting your disks is going to ware them
    > out faster. But you do reduce power and noise.
    >
    > So, set the timeout at a long enought time. Say, 1 or 2 hours.
    > That way, they will spin down during those periods of the day, where they
    > tipically aren't used.
    >
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Dances With Crows" wrote in message
    >> news:slrnfhptqs.ogl.danSPANceswithTRAPcrows@crow20 2.dyndns.org...
    >>> Rikishi 42 staggered into the Black Sun and said:
    >>>> On 2007-10-22, =SERGE= wrote:
    >>>>> should I look deeper into the hdparm to spin down drives etc ?
    >>>> Deeper than what? There is only one depth to it.
    >>>> hdparm -S 180 /dev/hda
    >>>> That sets timeout to 15 min. For details, 'man hdparm'.
    >>>
    >>> ...just remember that if a process wants to read from or write to a
    >>> disk, the disk subsystem will issue a spin-up command. Since there are
    >>> always processes reading from and writing to / and /var (syslog, various
    >>> daemons) then your /var disk will either be spinning constantly, or
    >>> jumping back and forth between spinning and not spinning. The first
    >>> case is better for long-term disk life even if it consumes slightly more
    >>> power. It should be easier to spin down disks that are not part of the
    >>> core system (not / , /var , /usr , or /home) and have them stay spun
    >>> down.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> ROBERT: So how do we get the pig to stop running around?
    >>> TRIANGLE: I think we'll have to rely on the staple gun once again.
    >>> --Triangle & Robert
    >>> Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to
    >>> see

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > --
    > There is an art, it says, or rather, a knack to flying.
    > The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.
    > Douglas Adams




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