software cooling - Hardware

This is a discussion on software cooling - Hardware ; Hi, I run a small home server behind a DSL. Its based on an old PIII-Coppermine 800MHz laptop. I disconnected the fan, I used cpu_freq to downclock it permanently to 650MHz. The system is quiet and cool - except if ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: software cooling

  1. software cooling

    Hi,

    I run a small home server behind a DSL. Its based on an old
    PIII-Coppermine 800MHz laptop. I disconnected the fan, I used cpu_freq
    to downclock it permanently to 650MHz. The system is quiet and cool -
    except if system load gets very high. Than the CPU Temp rices above 70C.


    Is there a tool/module to keep the CPU from getting to hot? Maybe
    something that inserts some halt statements - its no problem, if it
    slows down the system.


    Thanks

  2. Re: software cooling

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2007 07:10:07 -0700, Jens Ruecknagel wrote:

    > Is there a tool/module to keep the CPU from getting to hot?


    Yes, and it is called a CPU fan. Unless you want that CPU to last you less
    than a week reconnect the fan.

  3. Re: software cooling

    Larry Gagnon wrote:

    > On Sat, 06 Oct 2007 07:10:07 -0700, Jens Ruecknagel wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a tool/module to keep the CPU from getting to hot?

    >
    > Yes, and it is called a CPU fan. Unless you want that CPU to last you less
    > than a week reconnect the fan.


    Probably another not-so-helpful-answer but maybe you can just attach a big
    heatsink to help. I assume you want it fanless to have as little noise as
    possible, and I imagine the laptop processor probably came with a tiny
    fan/heatsink assembly.

    If you go with a larger heatsink, it'll only keep the processor from
    reaching that hotter temperature by delaying it, if you plan on keeping it
    under load, you'll eventually need a fan.

    I think I've seen some case fans that either turn on/off or they speed up
    depending on temp. Those may be useful for you. I think Antec makes them.

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  4. Re: software cooling

    V Sat, 06 Oct 2007 16:10:07 +0200, Jens Ruecknagel napsal(a):

    > Hi,
    >
    > I run a small home server behind a DSL. Its based on an old
    > PIII-Coppermine 800MHz laptop. I disconnected the fan, I used cpu_freq
    > to downclock it permanently to 650MHz. The system is quiet and cool -
    > except if system load gets very high. Than the CPU Temp rices above 70°C.
    >
    >
    > Is there a tool/module to keep the CPU from getting to hot? Maybe
    > something that inserts some halt statements - its no problem, if it
    > slows down the system.


    You could set up a daemon that wakes up, say, 10 times a second, checks
    cpu temp (see lmsensors package), and if necessary, downclocks it some
    more. When temp drops, it upclocks it.

    Of course, performance would suffer as, under load, the CPU would slow
    down but it would be quiet.

  5. Re: software cooling

    Captain Dondo staggered into the Black Sun and said:
    > V Sat, 06 Oct 2007 16:10:07 +0200, Jens Ruecknagel napsal(a):
    >> PIII-Coppermine 800MHz laptop. I disconnected the fan, I used cpu_freq
    >> to downclock it permanently to 650MHz. The system is quiet and cool--
    >> except if system load gets very high. Then the CPU Temp rises above 70 C.
    >> Is there a tool/module to keep the CPU from getting too hot?

    > You could set up a daemon that wakes up, say, 10 times a second, checks
    > cpu temp (see lmsensors package),


    The hardware that lm_sensors reads typically responds more slowly than
    that. You'd probably want to read at 1 Hz, not 10.

    > and if necessary, downclocks it some more. When temp drops, it
    > upclocks it.


    This sounds like reinventing the wheel. cpufreqd has a plugin and rules
    for CPU temp, though I don't know whether the acpi_temperature plugin
    would give good data on an old box like that. The "big heatsink"
    suggestion another poster put up probably won't work; laptops don't
    generally have much extra room for additional metal+fins.

    --
    Life is a persistent hallucination, Death a mere illusion.
    Taxes, however, are Objective Reality.
    Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see

  6. Re: software cooling

    V Sun, 07 Oct 2007 16:19:23 +0000, Dances With Crows napsal(a):

    > The hardware that lm_sensors reads typically responds more slowly than
    > that. You'd probably want to read at 1 Hz, not 10.


    I don't know how fast CPU temps can rise in a laptop; I'd be concerned
    about cooking the CPU at 1 sec response times. Maybe the current heat
    sink is big enough, though....

    >
    >> and if necessary, downclocks it some more. When temp drops, it
    >> upclocks it.

    >
    > This sounds like reinventing the wheel. cpufreqd has a plugin and rules
    > for CPU temp, though I don't know whether the acpi_temperature plugin
    > would give good data on an old box like that. The "big heatsink"
    > suggestion another poster put up probably won't work; laptops don't
    > generally have much extra room for additional metal+fins.
    >


    Hmmm... Didn't know that. I'll have to read up on cpufreqd. Too
    much to keep with, sometimes. If only I could quit my job and play with
    linux all the time.... Wait, that *is* my job.... :-)

    --Yan

  7. Re: software cooling

    In article <13gi6da84rg4p20@corp.supernews.com>,
    Captain Dondo wrote:
    > V Sun, 07 Oct 2007 16:19:23 +0000, Dances With Crows napsal(a):
    >
    > > The hardware that lm_sensors reads typically responds more slowly than
    > > that. You'd probably want to read at 1 Hz, not 10.

    >
    > I don't know how fast CPU temps can rise in a laptop;


    I suspect it can't rise from $NORMAL to $INSTANT_DEATH in under a
    second. That would put your CPU at dire risk should your OS screw up or
    your fan die. As a data point, until I implemented a workaround, my
    fan-control module didn't work after a hibernate-resume cycle. But
    something (the BIOS?) stepped in at 80C(?) and set the fan to max for
    emergency cooling.

    Not sure who said it, but a big heatsink may work for steady-state load,
    not just transient spikes, if it's big enough to set up sufficient
    convection.

    OP:

    Something you might try is making a "chimney" from the air exit port to
    aid convection. Even better if you remove the fan, since the blades
    add drag.

    --
    "Never go off on tangents, which are lines that intersect a curve at
    only one point and were discovered by Euclid, who lived in the 6th
    century, which was an era dominated by the Goths, who lived in what we
    now know as Poland." - from Nov. 1998 issue of Infosystems Executive.

  8. Re: software cooling

    On Oct 6, 9:10 am, Jens Ruecknagel wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I run a small home server behind a DSL. Its based on an old
    > PIII-Coppermine 800MHz laptop. I disconnected the fan, I used cpu_freq
    > to downclock it permanently to 650MHz. The system is quiet and cool -
    > except if system load gets very high. Than the CPU Temp rices above 70C.
    >
    > Is there a tool/module to keep the CPU from getting to hot? Maybe
    > something that inserts some halt statements - its no problem, if it
    > slows down the system.


    this is not helpful to you hw reuse wise but i'm building an e2160
    based box myself
    partly because in recent tomshardware tests the system worked even
    when the cpu fan was disconnected. I'm not sure what would it do to
    the cpu over the long term though even with a massive cpu cooler.


+ Reply to Thread