Differences between bluetooth and wireless? - Handheld

This is a discussion on Differences between bluetooth and wireless? - Handheld ; Hi I'm looking at buying an Ipaq 5550 however I don't understand the difference between Bluetooth and wireless (I know the 5550 has got both). Anyone able to explain the difference between them for me or point me in the ...

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Thread: Differences between bluetooth and wireless?

  1. Differences between bluetooth and wireless?

    Hi

    I'm looking at buying an Ipaq 5550 however I don't understand the difference
    between Bluetooth and wireless (I know the 5550 has got both). Anyone able
    to explain the difference between them for me or point me in the direction
    of a useful website? Primarily, I'll use one of the technologies to be able
    to surf whilst at home and I need to know if I'll use Bluetooth or wireless.

    Thanks

    Gareth



  2. Re: Differences between bluetooth and wireless?

    "Gareth" wrote in message news:<1069177505.2067.0@echo.uk.clara.net>...

    > I'm looking at buying an Ipaq 5550 however I don't understand the difference
    > between Bluetooth and wireless (I know the 5550 has got both). Anyone able
    > to explain the difference between them for me or point me in the direction
    > of a useful website?


    Wireless (Wifi) is a LAN without wires. Bluetooth is a way to connect
    primarily portable devices within a short range. The differences are:

    Wifi:
    + High speed, up to 54 Mb/s
    + Long range and can go through walls
    - Relatively high power consumption

    Bluetooth
    + Low power consumption
    + Supports other types of communication besides TCP-IP
    - Low speed, max 1 Mb/s, usually lower
    - Very short range. Walls will usually block.

    I don't use Wifi (my home network uses cables, call me old-fashioned
    :-). I use Bluetooth to:

    - Connect mobile phone with PDA for on-the-road internet access.
    Bluetooth is not the limiting factor. With GPRS I can get up
    to ~35 kb/s, without it's down to 9.6 kb/s.
    - Connect mobile phoen with wireless headset. The best way to use
    a phone bar none :-)
    - Connect PDA with GPS-receiver.

    For these purposes Bluetooth is not only the best, it is also the only
    way to get rid of cables. And for those who say "why don't you use
    Wifi for mobile internet?": Wifi hotspot coverage is less than 10% and
    that's in the cities. GSM coverage is above 90% all over the countries
    I visit.

    > Primarily, I'll use one of the technologies to be able
    > to surf whilst at home and I need to know if I'll use Bluetooth or wireless.


    Go with Wifi. It's designed for exactly this purpose.

    While you can create a TCP-IP connection using Bluetooth you will get
    far more out of using Wifi. With Bluetooth there will be dead spots in
    your home and the speed will not be that great. And when you're at
    home, you will be within reach of the Ipaq charger so the greater
    power consumption caused by Wifi will not be (that much of) a problem.

    Ebbe

  3. Re: Differences between bluetooth and wireless?

    "Ebbe Kristensen" wrote in message
    news:7cb16200.0311190000.64a47c26@posting.google.c om...
    > "Gareth" wrote in message

    news:<1069177505.2067.0@echo.uk.clara.net>...
    > > Primarily, I'll use one of the technologies to be able
    > > to surf whilst at home and I need to know if I'll use Bluetooth or

    wireless.
    >
    > Go with Wifi. It's designed for exactly this purpose.


    I have a Bluetooth ADSL modem (Class 1) at home and since you get almost
    512K DSL speeds even in Bluetooth synchronous connections, it is plenty for
    my needs. (Asynchronous Bluetooth connections run at about 723Kb/s
    downstream)

    > While you can create a TCP-IP connection using Bluetooth you will get
    > far more out of using Wifi. With Bluetooth there will be dead spots in
    > your home...


    That depends on the class of your Bluetooth equipment. Bluetooth signals can
    go through walls, but it all depends on the signal strength. Most mobile
    devices are Class 2 Bluetooth devices that only have a 10 metre range.
    However, you can often get Class 1 Bluetooth access points and USB dongles
    which have a 100 metre range, which will reach most parts of any house with
    many walls between (unless you have a huge mansion or massive garden). Even
    if you connect a Class 2 device to a Class 1 device, you can expect to get
    about a 40 metre range because Class 1 device receivers are typically much
    more sensitive.

    Though no matter what class of Bluetooth device you have the speed is still
    limited when compared to WiFi. If you want to build a home LAN and expect to
    be constantly moving large files between computers then WiFi is definitely
    better. But how large a file would you want to move to a PDA? Bluetooth
    still has enough bandwidth to stream audio and even low bitrate DivX video
    at PDA resolutions.

    HTH

    Colin



  4. Re: Differences between bluetooth and wireless?

    O.k. so what about the old iR ?

    My old IPAQ 3630, unfortunately doesn't have Bluetooth....soI have to resort
    to iR for connection to my SE T610 for internet etc....


    What are the main differences between iR and Bluetooth ?

    --



    Cheers,

    Brian Canham
    bcanham@bigpond.net.au
    "Colin Pinkney" wrote in message
    news:bpfdbd$4291@cvis05.marconicomms.com...
    > "Ebbe Kristensen" wrote in message
    > news:7cb16200.0311190000.64a47c26@posting.google.c om...
    > > "Gareth" wrote in message

    > news:<1069177505.2067.0@echo.uk.clara.net>...
    > > > Primarily, I'll use one of the technologies to be able
    > > > to surf whilst at home and I need to know if I'll use Bluetooth or

    > wireless.
    > >
    > > Go with Wifi. It's designed for exactly this purpose.

    >
    > I have a Bluetooth ADSL modem (Class 1) at home and since you get almost
    > 512K DSL speeds even in Bluetooth synchronous connections, it is plenty

    for
    > my needs. (Asynchronous Bluetooth connections run at about 723Kb/s
    > downstream)
    >
    > > While you can create a TCP-IP connection using Bluetooth you will get
    > > far more out of using Wifi. With Bluetooth there will be dead spots in
    > > your home...

    >
    > That depends on the class of your Bluetooth equipment. Bluetooth signals

    can
    > go through walls, but it all depends on the signal strength. Most mobile
    > devices are Class 2 Bluetooth devices that only have a 10 metre range.
    > However, you can often get Class 1 Bluetooth access points and USB dongles
    > which have a 100 metre range, which will reach most parts of any house

    with
    > many walls between (unless you have a huge mansion or massive garden).

    Even
    > if you connect a Class 2 device to a Class 1 device, you can expect to get
    > about a 40 metre range because Class 1 device receivers are typically much
    > more sensitive.
    >
    > Though no matter what class of Bluetooth device you have the speed is

    still
    > limited when compared to WiFi. If you want to build a home LAN and expect

    to
    > be constantly moving large files between computers then WiFi is definitely
    > better. But how large a file would you want to move to a PDA? Bluetooth
    > still has enough bandwidth to stream audio and even low bitrate DivX video
    > at PDA resolutions.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Colin
    >
    >




  5. Re: Differences between bluetooth and wireless?

    "Hi-Soft" wrote in message
    news:PxaNb.12140$Wa.1782@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
    > O.k. so what about the old iR ?
    >
    > My old IPAQ 3630, unfortunately doesn't have Bluetooth....soI have to

    resort
    > to iR for connection to my SE T610 for internet etc....
    >
    >
    > What are the main differences between iR and Bluetooth ?


    Two primary differences come to mind immediately. First, Ir is line of
    sight, while BT is not. That means that your Ir port must be pointing
    directly at the destination port without anything between them. Your BT
    antenna is not directional; it's orientation with respect to the destination
    antenna is irrelevant.

    The second difference is distance. AIUI, Ir is limited to a few metres at
    best. BT has 3 modes (or is the correct term classes?) with respect to
    distance. The lowest power mode yields just a few metres, but the most
    powerful mode yields several tens of metres.

    Free information - worth every penny.

    Jeff



  6. Re: Differences between bluetooth and wireless?

    Good day,

    > What are the main differences between iR and Bluetooth ?


    Um, many and varied.

    Firstly the obvious... IR uses infra-red, and Bluetooth uses radio
    communication. That intrinsically means that Bluetooth has more range.
    It also means that IR requires both "windows" to be within line of
    sight ... usually a fairly close distance too.

    Secondly, Bluetooth supports multiple profiles ... so with the
    appropriate hardware (and software), you can use it for communicating
    with many devices ... e.g., as a connection to a modem, to a printer, to
    another device to form a local network, etc.

    IrDA is rather more limited in both hardware and software. Usually, you
    are limited to transferring files from one device to another and
    printing and IrDA modems depending on both the hardware and software.

    Regards.

    --
    -------------------------------------
    Michael Tam
    e-mail: vitualis (at) michaeltam.com
    website: http://www.michaeltam.com

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