Nintendo might 'Retire' the Game Boy brand - Handheld

This is a discussion on Nintendo might 'Retire' the Game Boy brand - Handheld ; Harrison: Nintendo May 'Retire' Game Boy It's the most dominant handheld of all time. The Game Boy has been practically synonymous with portable gaming, but Nintendo may actually have retired the name, according to marketing exec George Harrison. Also, WiiWare ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Nintendo might 'Retire' the Game Boy brand

  1. Nintendo might 'Retire' the Game Boy brand

    Harrison: Nintendo May 'Retire' Game Boy

    It's the most dominant handheld of all time. The Game Boy has been
    practically synonymous with portable gaming, but Nintendo may actually
    have retired the name, according to marketing exec George Harrison.
    Also, WiiWare may be coming sooner than you think...


    While Shigeru Miyamoto recently confirmed to Kotaku that Nintendo's
    internal development teams have shifted their focus away from the GBA
    so that they can concentrate on Wii and DS titles, Nintendo of
    America's George Harrison, Senior Vice President of Marketing and
    Corporate Communications, has given GameDaily BIZ a pretty strong hint
    that Nintendo may be finished with the Game Boy product line.


    The DS was once referred to as a "third pillar" by Nintendo, but the
    handheld has been so phenomenally successful for the company that
    there's little pressure to sustain the Game Boy name in future
    handhelds.


    "This year in our marketing you really won't see much push against
    Game Boy itself, so it will kind of seek its own level. It's hard to
    say in the future if we will ever bring back the Game Boy trademark,"
    he told GameDaily BIZ in an E3 interview (full transcription coming
    soon).


    "It was a big risk for us to actually pass on it and call the new
    product the Nintendo DS, but it was part of Mr. Iwata's philosophy
    that if we're going to make a radical difference and try to reach a
    new audience, then we have to change the name... We had to make a
    break even though we had one of the greatest trademarks in the history
    of the industry."


    Harrison also informed us that Nintendo's WiiWare service could
    actually still launch this year. When the announcement was first made,
    Nintendo made it seem like we wouldn't see anything until early 2008,
    but Harrison isn't ruling out 2007 entirely.


    "It may not take until 2008. I've seen a couple of ideas that have
    already been generated even before we went public [with WiiWare].
    Whether those are going to be ready or not, I don't really know," he
    said.


    When pressed about WiiWare possibly taking off in 2007, he further
    explained, "It really depends on the developers. If they have their
    games ready and they're of an appropriate quality, then there's
    nothing to stop them from launching before the end of the year. It's
    just the fact that we only recently gave out the development tools and
    the development specifications, so most people haven't even started
    yet."


    We'll provide the full interview in the near future. Harrison talks
    about Wii Fit, the sales and marketing move to the Bay Area and New
    York, a possible revision of Wii hardware, and more. Stay tuned!

    http://biz.gamedaily.com/industry/feature/?id=16805


  2. Re: Nintendo might 'Retire' the Game Boy brand

    On Jul 16, 4:25 pm, AirRaid wrote:
    > Harrison: Nintendo May 'Retire' Game Boy
    >
    > It's the most dominant handheld of all time. The Game Boy has been
    > practically synonymous with portable gaming, but Nintendo may actually
    > have retired the name, according to marketing exec George Harrison.
    > Also, WiiWare may be coming sooner than you think...
    >
    > While Shigeru Miyamoto recently confirmed to Kotaku that Nintendo's
    > internal development teams have shifted their focus away from the GBA
    > so that they can concentrate on Wii and DS titles, Nintendo of
    > America's George Harrison, Senior Vice President of Marketing and
    > Corporate Communications, has given GameDaily BIZ a pretty strong hint
    > that Nintendo may be finished with the Game Boy product line.
    >
    > The DS was once referred to as a "third pillar" by Nintendo, but the
    > handheld has been so phenomenally successful for the company that
    > there's little pressure to sustain the Game Boy name in future
    > handhelds.
    >
    > "This year in our marketing you really won't see much push against
    > Game Boy itself, so it will kind of seek its own level. It's hard to
    > say in the future if we will ever bring back the Game Boy trademark,"
    > he told GameDaily BIZ in an E3 interview (full transcription coming
    > soon).
    >
    > "It was a big risk for us to actually pass on it and call the new
    > product the Nintendo DS, but it was part of Mr. Iwata's philosophy
    > that if we're going to make a radical difference and try to reach a
    > new audience, then we have to change the name... We had to make a
    > break even though we had one of the greatest trademarks in the history
    > of the industry."
    >
    > Harrison also informed us that Nintendo's WiiWare service could
    > actually still launch this year. When the announcement was first made,
    > Nintendo made it seem like we wouldn't see anything until early 2008,
    > but Harrison isn't ruling out 2007 entirely.
    >
    > "It may not take until 2008. I've seen a couple of ideas that have
    > already been generated even before we went public [with WiiWare].
    > Whether those are going to be ready or not, I don't really know," he
    > said.
    >
    > When pressed about WiiWare possibly taking off in 2007, he further
    > explained, "It really depends on the developers. If they have their
    > games ready and they're of an appropriate quality, then there's
    > nothing to stop them from launching before the end of the year. It's
    > just the fact that we only recently gave out the development tools and
    > the development specifications, so most people haven't even started
    > yet."
    >
    > We'll provide the full interview in the near future. Harrison talks
    > about Wii Fit, the sales and marketing move to the Bay Area and New
    > York, a possible revision of Wii hardware, and more. Stay tuned!
    >
    > http://biz.gamedaily.com/industry/feature/?id=16805


    Nintendo is using the term WiiWare to represent a few different things
    it seems. By one account any non-game application that is purchased or
    freely obtained through the Wii Shop channel (e.g. Wii's optional
    Opera web browser) has been called "WiiWare". In recent press releases
    they are referring to WiiWare as development platform for independant
    software developers (games and applications). I don't think it's very
    exciting, WiiWare really only excites one group and that's small
    companies that either have deep pockets or can get financing to
    produce a game.

    If you have a look at Nintendo's official developers web site (doesn't
    look legit at first, but it is- they own this domain):
    http://www.warioworld.com/

    You'll find nay software developer wanting to put out a game for the
    Wii platform still has to get approved for the development kit (which
    is no easy task, you have to apply for it and you have to prove to
    Nintendo that you are capable of producing a commerical quality title,
    namely by having at least one commerical console game in your
    portfolio, that elements almost 100% of the homebrew crowd), if you
    make it that far you have to cough up $2000 for the development kit
    and you have to cover Nintendo's cost to test your game extenshively
    (this alone I've been told can cost $10 grand or more).

    WiiWare is cool relative to what cost were before (dev kits for the
    360 is rumored to be around $20 grand and for the PS3 around $60
    grand), so $2000 is a good deal for small companies with pockets, but
    it doesn't tap into the passionate homebrew crowd. So far Microsoft's
    XNA developers club is the only thing to do that.

    The really sad thing is that home brew developers want to develop on
    Wii. Nintendo made sure Opera supports Macromedia Flash and sites like
    www.wiicade.com have popped up to cater to this crowd. All Nintendo
    really has to do is work with Macromedia and bring out a programmable
    API for their controller that works with Flash and then provide
    official Flash support outside of Opera. At least they did provide
    Macromedia Flash support.



















+ Reply to Thread