Help pls: selecting handheld fordeaf communication - Handheld

This is a discussion on Help pls: selecting handheld fordeaf communication - Handheld ; I've been asked to help an old and not-so-technical relative buy a Blackberry or the equivalent, mainly for text messaging and/or e-mail with deaf family members. (He is hearing, and an integrated cell phone might make sense.) Though computer-literate, I ...

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Thread: Help pls: selecting handheld fordeaf communication

  1. Help pls: selecting handheld fordeaf communication

    I've been asked to help an old and not-so-technical relative buy a
    Blackberry or the equivalent, mainly for text messaging and/or e-mail
    with deaf family members. (He is hearing, and an integrated cell phone
    might make sense.) Though computer-literate, I don't own one of these,
    and would appreciate a few thoughts before talking to salesmen.

    Key attributes are: easy to use, easy to read, and easy to enter data
    for very old eyes, fingers and habits. (He can just about work AOL.) Is
    there a system with minimal features, uncomplicated operation and easy
    recovery in the event of error?

    Thanks very much-

    Ctenos

  2. Re: Help pls: selecting handheld fordeaf communication

    On Mon, 05 Mar 2007 12:18:08 GMT, reply w/o spam
    <""SPAMctenos\"@worldnet.att.net (reply w/o spam)"> wrote:

    >I've been asked to help an old and not-so-technical relative buy a
    >Blackberry or the equivalent, mainly for text messaging and/or e-mail
    >with deaf family members. (He is hearing, and an integrated cell phone
    >might make sense.) Though computer-literate, I don't own one of these,
    >and would appreciate a few thoughts before talking to salesmen.
    >
    >Key attributes are: easy to use, easy to read, and easy to enter data
    >for very old eyes, fingers and habits. (He can just about work AOL.) Is
    >there a system with minimal features, uncomplicated operation and easy
    >recovery in the event of error?


    Old eyes will want a larger screen. Old fingers and habits suggest
    something resembling a real keyboard, rather than the "thumb boards"
    on Blackberries and similar. But large screen and "real" keyboard
    increase bulk.

    He might want to consider an external, folding keyboard (e.g.,
    http://www.mobileplanet.com/p.aspx?i=116176). And if he gets one of
    those, then he could save a bit of bulk by getting a handheld with no
    built-in keyboard (e.g. Pocket PC), or just a keypad for dialing. HTC
    makes many of the devices sold by other companies, so this link
    (http://www.htcphonestore.com/) will provide a good sample.

    If the prices on the examples I gave caused sticker shock, look around
    some more. I'm not on top of the market, but am pretty sure less
    expensive devices are available. Especially if you are willing to go
    with used and/or older devices. And devices with Windows Mobile 6 are
    just hitting the market, so prices on devices with older software are
    likely to drop.

    Small laptops can be very small. But the price increases as the size
    decreases. UMPCs (http://www.mobileplanet.com/p.aspx?i=126124) are at
    the small end. The HTC Advantage (see link above) looks similar to a
    UMPC, but runs a version of Windows CE, not "big" Windows.


    >
    >Thanks very much-
    >
    >Ctenos


    -----------------------------------------
    To reply to me, remove the underscores (_) from my email address (and please indicate which newsgroup and message).

    Robert E. Zaret, eMVP
    PenFact, Inc.
    20 Park Plaza, Suite 478
    Boston, MA 02116
    www.penfact.com

  3. Re: Help pls: selecting handheld fordeaf communication

    On Mar 5, 6:48 pm, r_z_aret@pen_fact.com wrote:
    > On Mon, 05 Mar 2007 12:18:08 GMT, reply w/o spam
    > <""SPAMctenos\"@worldnet.att.net (reply w/o spam)"> wrote:
    >
    > >I've been asked to help an old and not-so-technical relative buy a
    > >Blackberry or the equivalent, mainly for text messaging and/or e-mail
    > >with deaf family members. (He is hearing, and an integrated cell phone
    > >might make sense.) Though computer-literate, I don't own one of these,
    > >and would appreciate a few thoughts before talking to salesmen.

    >
    > >Key attributes are: easy to use, easy to read, and easy to enter data
    > >for very old eyes, fingers and habits. (He can just about work AOL.) Is
    > >there a system with minimal features, uncomplicated operation and easy
    > >recovery in the event of error?

    >
    > Old eyes will want a larger screen. Old fingers and habits suggest
    > something resembling a real keyboard, rather than the "thumb boards"
    > on Blackberries and similar. But large screen and "real" keyboard
    > increase bulk.
    >
    > He might want to consider an external, folding keyboard (e.g.,http://www.mobileplanet.com/p.aspx?i=116176). And if he gets one of
    > those, then he could save a bit of bulk by getting a handheld with no
    > built-in keyboard (e.g. Pocket PC), or just a keypad for dialing. HTC
    > makes many of the devices sold by other companies, so this link
    > (http://www.htcphonestore.com/) will provide a good sample.
    >
    > If the prices on the examples I gave caused sticker shock, look around
    > some more. I'm not on top of the market, but am pretty sure less
    > expensive devices are available. Especially if you are willing to go
    > with used and/or older devices. And devices with Windows Mobile 6 are
    > just hitting the market, so prices on devices with older software are
    > likely to drop.
    >
    > Small laptops can be very small. But the price increases as the size
    > decreases. UMPCs (http://www.mobileplanet.com/p.aspx?i=126124) are at
    > the small end. The HTC Advantage (see link above) looks similar to a
    > UMPC, but runs a version of Windows CE, not "big" Windows.
    >
    >
    >
    > >Thanks very much-

    >
    > >Ctenos

    >
    > -----------------------------------------
    > To reply to me, remove the underscores (_) from my email address (and please indicate which newsgroup and message).
    >
    > Robert E. Zaret, eMVP
    > PenFact, Inc.
    > 20 Park Plaza, Suite 478
    > Boston, MA 02116www.penfact.com


    Suggest you try something like a Nokia 93xx or 95xx mobile phone, it
    fits in the pocket, has a full keyboard & can use SMS & e-mail. My
    wife who is deaf & in her 60s has been using a 9300 for a couple of
    years & she won't go anywhere without it.

    Word of warning, your mobile phone bill can increase significantly if
    they like it like my wife does.

    Mike


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