Re: Available I/O addresses - GEOS

This is a discussion on Re: Available I/O addresses - GEOS ; Well, this is the standard set up that Bob gives, but sharing IRQ, will only work in theory, not in practice in DOS. Sharing interrupts means that COM1 and COM3 uses the same interrupt, which is in this case is ...

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Thread: Re: Available I/O addresses

  1. Re: Available I/O addresses

    Well, this is the standard set up that Bob gives, but sharing IRQ, will
    only work in theory, not in practice in DOS. Sharing interrupts means that
    COM1 and COM3 uses the same interrupt, which is in this case is IRQ4, and
    COM2 and COM4 uses the IRQ3. BTW, if you did not know it IRQ stands for Interrupt
    ReQuest, in daily talk just "interrupt". I will recommend this setup if you
    are using ALL four ports:

    PORT I/O IRQ
    COM1 03F8 4
    COM2 02F8 3
    COM3 03E8 2 (9) (Cascaded)
    COM4 02F8 5

    But you might have a problem here running out of IRQs, so reduce it to the
    number for ports you actually use. In modern computers IRQ2 (the same as
    9) is used by the PCI "plug and play". You need to enter the computers setup
    and set it to "Legacy" or something like that. IRQ5 might be used by printer
    or soundcard, so you have to be careful to avoid conflicts and misfunctions
    in your computer. One good trick is to write down on a piece of paper the
    current setup of interrupts to avoid problems, doublecheck, and from that
    take the appropriate measures.

    BR,
    Hans


    Bob wrote:
    > How do you have the modem configured? Is it a "software" modem, or a "real"
    > modem? Can u disable a COM port in CMOS and use its' I/O, IRQ?
    >
    > PORT I/O IRQ
    > COM1 03F8 4
    > COM2 02F8 3
    > COM3 03E8 4
    > COM4 02F8 3
    >
    > I could NEVER get "TurboComm ViP" to work, and have questioned as to if

    it
    > actually does.
    >
    > "RCantrell" wrote in message
    > news:20031001223029.01893.00000954@mb-m22.aol.com...
    > > I need to know what I/O addresses 3.2a and 4.20 can access. I have

    > reinstalled
    > > both programs and run TurboComm ViP to set up a virtual COM port and

    IRQ.
    > But
    > > the I/O addresses I have tried do not work, and I get a message in NewDeal
    > > which says it cannot recognize the IRQ.
    > >
    > > TurboCom ViP tells me to be sure to select I/O addresses which my DOS

    > program
    > > can access.
    > >
    > > I need this info in order to get my Creative Modem Blaster Flash56 modem
    > > working again so I can use the FAX program in 3.2a.
    > >
    > > If anyone can help me I will really appreciate it.
    > >
    > > Dick

    >
    >
    >


  2. Re: Available I/O addresses

    In article , Hans Lindgren
    writes:

    >Well, this is the standard set up that Bob gives, but sharing IRQ, will
    >only work in theory, not in practice in DOS. Sharing interrupts means that
    >COM1 and COM3 uses the same interrupt, which is in this case is IRQ4, and
    >COM2 and COM4 uses the IRQ3. BTW, if you did not know it IRQ stands for
    >Interrupt
    >ReQuest, in daily talk just "interrupt". I will recommend this setup if you
    >are using ALL four ports:
    >
    > PORT I/O IRQ
    > COM1 03F8 4
    > COM2 02F8 3
    > COM3 03E8 2 (9) (Cascaded)
    > COM4 02F8 5
    >
    >But you might have a problem here running out of IRQs, so reduce it to the
    >number for ports you actually use. In modern computers IRQ2 (the same as
    >9) is used by the PCI "plug and play". You need to enter the computers setup
    >and set it to "Legacy" or something like that. IRQ5 might be used by printer
    >or soundcard, so you have to be careful to avoid conflicts and misfunctions
    >in your computer. One good trick is to write down on a piece of paper the
    >current setup of interrupts to avoid problems, doublecheck, and from that
    >take the appropriate measures.
    >
    >BR,
    >Hans


    Thanks, Hans.

    Dick

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