Re: Moral victory... - GEOS

This is a discussion on Re: Moral victory... - GEOS ; On 24 Jul 2003 00:47:46 GMT, Ray Kopczynski wrote: > > employees to use. >> > > "cow-workers" -- A freudian slip no doubt... :-) > > Ray You must not be a Dilbert fan.... >:-0 Tom -- Using M2, ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: Re: Moral victory...

  1. Re: Moral victory...

    On 24 Jul 2003 00:47:46 GMT, Ray Kopczynski wrote:

    > << These macros have made this Excel db very easy for my cow-orkers and
    > employees to use. >>
    >
    > "cow-workers" -- A freudian slip no doubt... :-)
    >
    > Ray



    You must not be a Dilbert fan.... >:-0

    Tom



    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/

  2. Re: Moral victory...

    Ray,

    Hmmmmm. I think you should bone up on the history of American industry. One
    of the things that discouraged competition with AT&T and the Railroads (I'll
    keep it down to those two) was the Right of Way to lay pound poles into the
    ground and lay rail, in addition to the tremendous capital it took to build
    an infrastructure. The combination of the two pretty much made it impossible
    to compete. Not that people didn't try. Not that some spotty efforts were
    not successful. But on the Grande scale, the King of the Hill controlled all
    that he surveyed and squished the competition. You had virtually ZERO
    chance.

    With computer programs, distribution channels are so plentiful that its
    impossible to kill the competition. Take GEOS, it was by word of mouth and a
    check in the mail. That's all it took to generate sales. Geoworks Ensemble
    didn't even have the advantage that BBX Ensemble has today, yet, 12 years
    ago GEOS was far more popular than it is today. So, the initial success of
    GEOS is living example that a little guy has a clear shot at carving out a
    niche and making it. But can the little guy keep the ball rolling. Yes!
    Unfortunately, the overwhelming reason for the failure of GEOS to grow was
    Geoworks, itself. They took too long preparing new versions of GEOS and gave
    Windows a big opening to pass it on the rail. ... And its Seabiscuit by a
    nose. Seriously, Geoworks was its own worst enemy. It had incredibly
    brilliant developers, but they were offset by unbelievable dumb planners and
    marketeers. Go figure.

    Since Geoworks did their Pontius Pilot with Ensemble, a couple of Newsgroups
    (COG and COGM) have been awash in predictions, for years, that GEOS will
    make it. Don't you think its time to stop believing in myths and admit that
    GEOS is dangling frozen, alongside Ted Williams. Come over from the dark
    side and join the good guys. If you keep your current line of rhetoric up,
    someday you'll say the wrong thing, not really meaning the way it will be
    interpreted, and you will be voted off the Island by your peers. It happens
    that fast around here. Don't worry, you can join us on the other Island
    where its more fun any way. Surf's Up!




  3. Re: Moral victory...

    << One of the things that discouraged competition with AT&T and the Railroads
    (I'll keep it down to those two) was the Right of Way to lay pound poles into
    the ground and lay rail, in addition to the tremendous capital it took to build
    an infrastructure. The combination of the two pretty much made it impossible to
    compete. Not that people didn't try...You had virtually ZERO
    chance. >>

    All of the above (and more) do reinforce my contention that it becomes nigh-on
    impossible to garner an appreciable market share in any industry where there is
    an established monopoly. I do not perceive a material difference with any
    individual company today that would attempt to introduce an additional
    operating system.

    << Geoworks...GEOS and gave had incredibly brilliant developers, but they were
    offset by unbelievable dumb planners and marketeers. >>

    Hindsight is always 20-20, but I agree wholeheartedly with your statement
    there! And -- having been in some discussions with folks while visiting MyTurn,
    I could see the same thing happening all over again. Attempts to try and
    rectify the situation simly fell on deaf ears for sure. I firmly believe that
    the product in and of itself was/is well designed for what it was intended to
    do -- how it was marketed at the store level beggared my imagination. Whole
    'nuther & different story there. :-)

    << Surf's Up! >>

    Still is...

    Ray


  4. Re: Moral victory...

    Better you connect a dedicated PC over a standard interface to the CNC
    machines. The controll panel used today will do the job in99.9%.

    Andreas

    "Tom Accuosti" wrote in message
    news:3KDTa.18711$Mc.1428310@newsread1.prod.itd.ear thlink.net...
    > In news:Ip5dQMbWjEcZ-pn2-dE3UIvqhKIrV@localhost,
    > Doug Fitzpatrick wrote:
    > | On Wed, 23 Jul 2003 16:28:51 UTC, "Tom Accuosti"
    > | wrote:
    > |
    > || I have a machine shop. Some of the guys would like to do
    > || a job with equipment that we don't have. Some guys would like to
    > || change the established processes, but aren't willing to prove out
    > || the new process first. I have a number of CNC milling machines from
    > || one manufacturer because I like how they work and I like the tech
    > || support. Same thing for my CNC lathes. And the tooling. I don't want
    > || a hodgepodge of differnt tools and machines - my business depends on
    > || keeping some consistency. And there's nothing wrong with companies
    > || who want to keep that consistency in computer hardware or software.
    > |
    > | Tom,
    > | Just out of curiosity, do the CNC machines run MS software?
    >
    > LOL - No. Most CNC software is customized for the various controls. A
    > few manufacturers are starting to put GUI front-ends on the machines,
    > but most buyers are releuctant to hop onto anything new. I can't blame
    > them, either; when you crash your P2400, it's a hassle to get things up
    > and running, but generally nobody gets hurt. A crash on a lathe running
    > at 4,000 RPM, or a milling machine skimming the top off a 20" wide hunk
    > of steel is gonna *sound* like a crash, and possibly cause thousands of
    > dollars in broken parts, injury, etc.
    >
    > I have 5 lathes, though, that use regular PC motherboards. In fact, the
    > oldest ones use 286 boards and the base software is DOS, although after
    > it boots up (from a floppy - I kid you not), there is a seperate ISA
    > card that takes over and runs the various axis motion controls. Some
    > years back, I bought some old 40meg (yes, MEG) hard drives and hooked
    > them up. I've got one machine that runs Win31, and I can actually
    > Alt-Tab in the middle of a machining cycle to get to Windows. I don't do
    > that, of course - I just hooked it up to mess with the manufacturer,
    > since he told me that it couldn't be done.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >




+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2