Returning to GEOS after some time away - GEOS

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Thread: Returning to GEOS after some time away

  1. Returning to GEOS after some time away

    I was an active member of the GEOS community starting with CBM GEOS
    when it came out, then moving on to PC/GEOS in the late-90s to the year
    2000 (I did a search for my name in comp.os.geos.misc and 241 hits came
    up ). I was even a beta tester for New Deal Office, and was happy
    to have made a contribution there. I eventually moved on to an
    NT-flavour of Windows and (at the time) it was darn-near impossible to
    get PC/GEOS running reliably under NT. I understand more has been
    learned about making it work these days so I intend to take a stab at
    that again.

    I recently moved and wanted to find a Windows app (either freeware
    or at least inexpensive) that would let me create a room, create
    objects to scale in the room to model the furnite, and let me
    manipulate the objects in the room to figure out how to organise the
    furniture at the new place. I tried Windows' included paint programme.
    I tried OpenOffice. I hit a few shareware and freeware sites looking
    for something useful. I quickly came to the conclusion that one of the
    following was true:

    - either there was no free/inexpensive Windows software that would do
    what I wanted, or

    - I could not find said software, or could not find said functionality
    *IN* the software.

    I was particularly critical of OpenOffice from a user interface
    point of view, as menu options often seem put in illogical places or
    named in ways that don't suggest their utility.

    I broke out my old Compaq 486 (with integrated monitor, in the style
    of the classic Macs), booted up NDO (well, NewDeal School Suite to get
    technical as that was the most recent release I had on that machine,
    probably something left over from my NDO beta-testing days). I rapidly
    modeled a room (NewDraw let me create a larger piece of paper than
    OpenOffice's graphics programme would, allowing me to do a 1/10 scale
    and make conversion easy), rapidly modeled the objects, moved them
    around, and had the entire job done in less time than I spent with
    OpenOffice trying to ascertain whether it had the tools to do the job
    in the first place. My roommate was also a former NDO user and she
    helped me make some of the decisions about what to place where, and
    both of us were struck about how much we'd lost moving on from NDO. In
    particular, the tear-off menus made things dramatically faster (the job
    meant a lot of zooming in and out from the page and rotating objects
    around ad-naseum ). NDO (and Ensemble, and..., and... ) has the
    right features for most jobs and has them logically arranged and easily
    accessible.

    I want more. I tried (and failed ) to win a GeoBook auction on
    eBay earlier today. I love the idea of a solid-state notebook that I
    can throw in my pannier bags (I'm a cyclist).

    Now for a few questions:

    - Did any flavour of PC/GEOS end up with a spreadsheet that could link
    cells from one spreadsheet file to another?

    - Have the broadband internet connection issues been worked out in the
    newer versions?

    - Does anyone know of a GeoBook (either NB-60 or NB-80c) for sale? I'm
    in the market.

    - I was looking at the specs of the original (PC/GEOS-based) Global PC
    system, and was surprised to note that it had an audio-in port
    according to at least one site. Is this for real, and is there any
    software to take advantage of it? In addition, there was a question as
    to whether it used a replaceable CMOS battery, does anyone know if it
    does or not? I'm considering picking one up on eBay.

    Thanks in advance, and I look forward to chatting more with you all
    again.


  2. Re: Returning to GEOS after some time away

    Give it up. GEOS is an outdated DOS GUI of 100 years ago.

    "Steven Hurdle" wrote in message
    news:1160438374.628949.148140@e3g2000cwe.googlegro ups.com...
    > I was an active member of the GEOS community starting with CBM GEOS
    > when it came out, then moving on to PC/GEOS in the late-90s to the year
    > 2000 (I did a search for my name in comp.os.geos.misc and 241 hits came
    > up ). I was even a beta tester for New Deal Office, and was happy
    > to have made a contribution there. I eventually moved on to an
    > NT-flavour of Windows and (at the time) it was darn-near impossible to
    > get PC/GEOS running reliably under NT. I understand more has been
    > learned about making it work these days so I intend to take a stab at
    > that again.
    >
    > I recently moved and wanted to find a Windows app (either freeware
    > or at least inexpensive) that would let me create a room, create
    > objects to scale in the room to model the furnite, and let me
    > manipulate the objects in the room to figure out how to organise the
    > furniture at the new place. I tried Windows' included paint programme.
    > I tried OpenOffice. I hit a few shareware and freeware sites looking
    > for something useful. I quickly came to the conclusion that one of the
    > following was true:
    >
    > - either there was no free/inexpensive Windows software that would do
    > what I wanted, or
    >
    > - I could not find said software, or could not find said functionality
    > *IN* the software.
    >
    > I was particularly critical of OpenOffice from a user interface
    > point of view, as menu options often seem put in illogical places or
    > named in ways that don't suggest their utility.
    >
    > I broke out my old Compaq 486 (with integrated monitor, in the style
    > of the classic Macs), booted up NDO (well, NewDeal School Suite to get
    > technical as that was the most recent release I had on that machine,
    > probably something left over from my NDO beta-testing days). I rapidly
    > modeled a room (NewDraw let me create a larger piece of paper than
    > OpenOffice's graphics programme would, allowing me to do a 1/10 scale
    > and make conversion easy), rapidly modeled the objects, moved them
    > around, and had the entire job done in less time than I spent with
    > OpenOffice trying to ascertain whether it had the tools to do the job
    > in the first place. My roommate was also a former NDO user and she
    > helped me make some of the decisions about what to place where, and
    > both of us were struck about how much we'd lost moving on from NDO. In
    > particular, the tear-off menus made things dramatically faster (the job
    > meant a lot of zooming in and out from the page and rotating objects
    > around ad-naseum ). NDO (and Ensemble, and..., and... ) has the
    > right features for most jobs and has them logically arranged and easily
    > accessible.
    >
    > I want more. I tried (and failed ) to win a GeoBook auction on
    > eBay earlier today. I love the idea of a solid-state notebook that I
    > can throw in my pannier bags (I'm a cyclist).
    >
    > Now for a few questions:
    >
    > - Did any flavour of PC/GEOS end up with a spreadsheet that could link
    > cells from one spreadsheet file to another?
    >
    > - Have the broadband internet connection issues been worked out in the
    > newer versions?
    >
    > - Does anyone know of a GeoBook (either NB-60 or NB-80c) for sale? I'm
    > in the market.
    >
    > - I was looking at the specs of the original (PC/GEOS-based) Global PC
    > system, and was surprised to note that it had an audio-in port
    > according to at least one site. Is this for real, and is there any
    > software to take advantage of it? In addition, there was a question as
    > to whether it used a replaceable CMOS battery, does anyone know if it
    > does or not? I'm considering picking one up on eBay.
    >
    > Thanks in advance, and I look forward to chatting more with you all
    > again.
    >




  3. Re: Returning to GEOS after some time away

    Here in comp.os.geos.misc, "Bob"
    spake unto us, saying:

    >Give it up. GEOS is an outdated DOS GUI of 100 years ago.


    GEM is still being developed for FreeDOS, but PC/GEOS is considerably
    more sophisticated than GEM in many respects.

    Age isn't always a sign of poor functionality. Look at the wheel...

    --
    -Rich Steiner >>>---> http://www.visi.com/~rsteiner >>>---> Mableton, GA USA
    Mainframe/Unix bit twiddler by day, OS/2+Linux+DOS hobbyist by night.
    WARNING: I've seen FIELDATA FORTRAN V and I know how to use it!
    The Theorem Theorem: If If, Then Then.

  4. Re: Returning to GEOS after some time away


    "Richard Steiner" wrote in message
    news:VQUMFpHpvmsB092yn@visi.com...
    > Here in comp.os.geos.misc, "Bob"
    > spake unto us, saying:
    >
    >>Give it up. GEOS is an outdated DOS GUI of 100 years ago.

    >
    > GEM is still being developed for FreeDOS, but PC/GEOS is considerably
    > more sophisticated than GEM in many respects.
    >
    > Age isn't always a sign of poor functionality. Look at the wheel...
    >
    > --
    > -Rich Steiner >>>---> http://www.visi.com/~rsteiner >>>---> Mableton, GA
    > USA
    > Mainframe/Unix bit twiddler by day, OS/2+Linux+DOS hobbyist by night.
    > WARNING: I've seen FIELDATA FORTRAN V and I know how to use it!
    > The Theorem Theorem: If If, Then Then.


    "isn't always" being the operative. In the case of electronics, and OS's
    I'd disagree. Age IS certainly a sign of poor functionally.



  5. Re: Returning to GEOS after some time away

    Here in comp.os.geos.misc, "Bob"
    spake unto us, saying:

    >"Richard Steiner" wrote in message
    >news:VQUMFpHpvmsB092yn@visi.com...
    >
    >> GEM is still being developed for FreeDOS, but PC/GEOS is considerably
    >> more sophisticated than GEM in many respects.
    >>
    >> Age isn't always a sign of poor functionality. Look at the wheel...

    >
    > "isn't always" being the operative. In the case of electronics, and OS's
    > I'd disagree. Age IS certainly a sign of poor functionally.


    It all depends on the functionality you're talking about, as well as
    the types of OSes that you're talking about and your definition of
    "age" in an OS context. :-)

    In terms of functionality, I would say that media support (meaning in
    terms of sound and video) certainly improves with age, as does support
    for data storage media, and that older platforms do very badly compared
    to newer ones if more than simply 2D graphics or simple hard/diskette
    drives are a necessity.

    However, in terms of stability, security, thread handling, the ability
    to dynamically adjust process priorities, and other similar criteria,
    operating systems like BeOS and OS/2 will tend to run rings around the
    Windows variants being produced today. Still.

    PC/GEOS is simple in some respects (two threads per process, a somewhat
    limited if flexible GUI, etc.), but given its reqource requirements it
    is still able to run on hardware where Windows and Linux variants fail.

    Most of the server operating systems that I'm familiar with and have
    worked with over the years (including UNIX variants, OS1100/2200, and
    MCP among others) are far older in architectural and API continuity
    than Microsoft has existed as a corporate entity, and yet all of those
    platforms are functional supersets of anything that I've seen in the
    Microsoft product universe.

    That seems to suggest to me that new platforms are often very poor at
    what they do compared to older proven platforms, at least in the server
    realm. I suspect z/OS also traces before OS/390 to some older IBM OS
    architecture.

    I guess I don't know what to say except that I believe that you are
    overgeneralizing. :-)

    --
    -Rich Steiner >>>---> http://www.visi.com/~rsteiner >>>---> Mableton, GA USA
    Mainframe/Unix bit twiddler by day, OS/2+Linux+DOS hobbyist by night.
    WARNING: I've seen FIELDATA FORTRAN V and I know how to use it!
    The Theorem Theorem: If If, Then Then.

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