uTorrent causes router loss of DNS connectivety - Firewalls

This is a discussion on uTorrent causes router loss of DNS connectivety - Firewalls ; Occasionally (every 4 or so hours) my router loses DNS connectivety (or the ability to forward my dns inquires). This only seems to happen when I am downloading torrents, so I assume it is related. I use "uTorrent" as my ...

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Thread: uTorrent causes router loss of DNS connectivety

  1. uTorrent causes router loss of DNS connectivety

    Occasionally (every 4 or so hours) my router loses DNS connectivety
    (or the ability to forward my dns inquires). This only seems to happen
    when I am downloading torrents, so I assume it is related. I use
    "uTorrent" as my client. I've experienced this same phenomenon on
    three different types of routers now over the past year or so. It's
    something I've battled with quite a few times.

    If anyone else has experience with this specific problem (routers
    +torrents=dead dns) I'd love to hear your thoughts! Am I just
    overwhelming these puny cheapo $30 routers? I read something about the
    router NAT tables getting overwhelmed then disrupting DNS, anyone have
    more info about this? Will a better router solve my problems?

    More Details:
    - I'm not a complete moron (meaning: the router is plugged in & turned
    on, etc etc!)
    - On the router(s) I set port forwarding correctly for the torrent
    software.
    - This loss of DNS connectivety affects all LAN computers at the same
    time, regardless of if they are wired or wireless.
    - It happens every 1-10 hours randomly, usually when the router is
    under a fair amount of stress (overheating???).
    - All computers retain LAN and WAN conectivety; meaning I can still
    connect to my shared folders & my torrents are still moving.
    - Running NSLOOKUP from dos confirms there is no DNS connectivety.
    - I cannot connect to the router via the browser when this is
    hapenning
    - I've experienced this on 3 different routers: a DLink WBR-1310
    Wireless, a Gigafast WF719-CAPR Wireless, and some unknown 4 port
    Dlink wired.
    - Note: all three routers were "cheapo" models.
    - Main computer is running Xp Home and the torrent software.
    - I have tried both dynamic and static IPs and DNS settings on the Xp
    Home machine.
    - I have tried both Zonealarm and Sygate Firewalls. I dont use WinXP's
    Firewall. I've tried disabling all firewalls completely.
    - I have tried lowering the maximum amount of connections uTorrent can
    make, down to 20.

    Below are two similar (unsolved) posts I found on google:
    http://tinyurl.com/2fqkpg
    http://tinyurl.com/262m35


    Any thoughts would be appreciated. I'd like to know exactly what's
    happening here.


  2. Re: uTorrent causes router loss of DNS connectivety

    dennispublic@hotmail.com wrote:
    > Occasionally (every 4 or so hours) my router loses DNS connectivety
    > (or the ability to forward my dns inquires). This only seems to happen
    > when I am downloading torrents, so I assume it is related. I use
    > "uTorrent" as my client. I've experienced this same phenomenon on
    > three different types of routers now over the past year or so. It's
    > something I've battled with quite a few times.


    {snip}

    > Any thoughts would be appreciated. I'd like to know exactly what's
    > happening here.
    >


    The only thing I've seen work somewhat reliably is reducing the number
    of concurrent connections you allow. This is different than the number
    of active torrents. The reason (as I've seen it) is that if you let an
    unlimited number of connections occur, you actually DO overwhelm your
    router and it begins to hiccup.

    A small word of warning about downloading torrents though... Most
    torrent sites (possibly all) record your IP when you connect to a
    torrent and that data gets added to "trackers." The next client that
    accesses that torrent will receive a list of IP addresses known to have
    all or part of the file, and will attempt to connect to you to get a piece.

    If you access a popular torrent file, this can quickly snowball into a
    LOT of requests being sent your way. This can interfere slightly with
    your available bandwidth.

    If your router supports logging, take a look at all the incoming
    connection requests on the port you use for torrent transfers.

  3. Re: uTorrent causes router loss of DNS connectivety

    On 8 Feb 2007 23:35:15 -0800, dennispublic@hotmail.com wrote:

    >Occasionally (every 4 or so hours) my router loses DNS connectivety
    >(or the ability to forward my dns inquires). This only seems to happen
    >when I am downloading torrents, so I assume it is related. I use
    >"uTorrent" as my client.


    I experience the same thing very infrequently and I use Azureus.


    Tom

    --
    remove .spoo to reply by email

  4. Re: uTorrent causes router loss of DNS connectivety

    dennispublic@hotmail.com wrote on 8 Feb 2007 23:35:15 -0800:

    > Occasionally (every 4 or so hours) my router loses DNS connectivety
    > (or the ability to forward my dns inquires). This only seems to happen
    > when I am downloading torrents, so I assume it is related. I use
    > "uTorrent" as my client. I've experienced this same phenomenon on
    > three different types of routers now over the past year or so. It's
    > something I've battled with quite a few times.
    >
    > If anyone else has experience with this specific problem (routers
    > +torrents=dead dns) I'd love to hear your thoughts! Am I just
    > overwhelming these puny cheapo $30 routers? I read something about the
    > router NAT tables getting overwhelmed then disrupting DNS, anyone have
    > more info about this? Will a better router solve my problems?


    Whenever I've experienced this, the solution has been to change the PC DNS
    servers to those of my ISP. In the routers I've used in the past (all of
    them Netgear), if you have the option enabled to automatically get the DNS
    servers then the DHCP settings cause the PCs on the LAN to use a DNS Proxy
    on the router itself, which very quickly gets overwhelmed when using a
    torrent client. By setting the PC to use the ISP DNS directly (or in the
    case of a Netgear router by turning off the "Get DNS from ISP automatically"
    option and instead entering the DNS server addresses themselves, which them
    results in those addresses being passed out via DHCP) I no longer saw DNS
    resolution problems with my routers.

    While I have no experience of the routers you are using, I'd suggest giving
    it a shot. These cheap devices have very little RAM and little processing
    power, and trying to maintain a large DNS cache just seems beyond them when
    the rest of the system is trying to use those resources too.

    Dan



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