The Classical Hour - Firewalls

This is a discussion on The Classical Hour - Firewalls ; X-No-Archive: Yes mak wrote: > Chilly8 wrote: > > We have just added another program to the line up on our station, > > that is attracting quite a few listeners, the Classical Hour. A couple > > times a ...

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Thread: The Classical Hour

  1. Re: The Classical Hour

    X-No-Archive: Yes

    mak wrote:
    > Chilly8 wrote:
    > > We have just added another program to the line up on our station,
    > > that is attracting quite a few listeners, the Classical Hour. A couple
    > > times a we air an hourlong program of classical music which is
    > > apparently quite popular with people working in offices.
    > > I have a listener in Sheffield, England, to that show, who uses a
    > > heavily encrypted tunnel to listen to that show, so she can enjoy, say,
    > > a Mozart symphony, and the boss wont know what she is up to. The boss
    > > will know that is a either a 64k or 256K (classical music demands a
    > > much higher bitrate than other audio broadcasts), encrypted outbound
    > > connection, but there is no POSSIBLE way they can find out that she was
    > > listening to Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony in B minor "Pathetique", on
    > > her work computer, when she was on the other day, during an airing of
    > > the show. Even if they used Snort, of some other packet sniffer, they
    > > would have gotten nothing, as the data packets would have been
    > > encrypted.
    > >

    > here goes the figureskater again...


    Well, we are here in Poland, schedule to begin broadcasting the
    European championships, in just a few hours. This will make the 6th
    year in a row of broadcasting the European championships. People in
    European workplaces tune into our online coverage, becuase we go to
    every length humanly possible to ensure that figure skating fans (and
    there are a LOT more of them in Europe, than in the USA) can tune into
    the European championships without the boss knowing about it. During
    the European championships, the geographic reports do often show in
    increased number of hits from Europe. Europeans love us, because I do
    everything possible to let them listen in a way where the boss will be
    less likely to find out.
    You see, I have the server for the online station I own at a data
    center down Mexico way. With the "relay" I have, they would know that
    someone was connecting to some strange address in Mexico, and never
    know they they are connecting to someone's Live 365 feed.
    Plus, the fact that I will be dropping the bitrate down to 8K
    during live broadcasts of Europeans will make it even LESS likely that
    someone will get caught. At only 8K, you would only use a few megabytes
    a day, even if you listened to the entire days worth of programming.
    Becuase of the extremly low bandwidth usage, it will not stick out like
    the proveribal sore thumb, in any usage reports.


  2. Re: The Classical Hour

    In article <1169545707.250379.15630@k78g2000cwa.googlegroups.c om>,
    chilly8@hotmail.com says...
    > You see, I have the server for the online station I own at a data
    > center down Mexico way. With the "relay" I have, they would know that
    > someone was connecting to some strange address in Mexico, and never
    > know they they are connecting to someone's Live 365 feed.


    And in a properly configured solution they would never be able to
    connect to a "strange" server anywhere.

    You keep missing the entire point, only a improperly secured business
    allows connections to the world, so, a properly setup network would
    never allow a connection to an undefined location like yours.

    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me

  3. Re: The Classical Hour

    X-No-Archive: Yes


    On Jan 23, 3:40 am, Leythos wrote:
    > In article <1169545707.250379.15...@k78g2000cwa.googlegroups.c om>,
    > chil...@hotmail.com says...
    >
    > > You see, I have the server for the online station I own at a data
    > > center down Mexico way. With the "relay" I have, they would know that
    > > someone was connecting to some strange address in Mexico, and never
    > > know they they are connecting to someone's Live 365 feed.And in a properly configured solution they would never be able to

    > connect to a "strange" server anywhere.
    >
    > You keep missing the entire point, only a improperly secured business
    > allows connections to the world, so, a properly setup network would
    > never allow a connection to an undefined location like yours.



    However, part of my radio station operations (like a few other
    internet radio stations), is to sell time to broadcasters. The people
    that buy time from me to air The Classical Hour, expect their show to
    be heard. They expect their advertisers to be heard. In addition to my
    programs (e.g. my talk show, and my sports coverage), I also have added
    programs from other people buying sime on my station,and connecting to
    my servers. For the highest level bitrate (256K, currently only used by
    The Classical Hour(, they are paying a LOT of money, and EXPECT their
    show to be heard. I am hell-bent on seeing that my customers get what
    they PAID for. That is why I have engineers that do everything possible
    to come up with ways where my customers' shows can be heard by people
    wanting to tune in from work (hence the "relay" from my server, to fool
    the boss's filtering system). I have both a Live 365 feed, as well as a
    feed off my server. As of right now, NONE of the major filtering
    vendors (which are used in nearly all the Fortune 500 companies) have
    any of my servers in their blacklists, so if you are working for a
    Fortune 500 company, you will very likely be able to tune in to any
    show broadcast on my station. Being that the severs are housed in a
    data center in Mexico, they are far less likely to appear in any
    blacklists, as servers in Mexico will not appear in any blacklists.


  4. Re: The Classical Hour

    Why are you putting an email hearer in your posts?

    chilly8@hotmail.com wrote:
    > X-No-Archive: Yes


    [snip]

    > My clients like me, beuase they know that if the buy time on my
    > network, that I will do everything possible to make it more difficult
    > for employers to block their programming from the workplace. They and
    > their adversiers expect their message to be heard.


    You are not making it more difficult to block your programming, it is
    trivial.

    Incidentally, of all the Internet connected system that I use/ manage at
    work are not capable of receiving your content as you have described it.
    This is not a reaction to your posts, but the standand configuration.
    Streaming media is rarely used for work purposes. If it is required, it
    is enabled on a case-by-case basis, to the site required.

    Bogwitch.

  5. Re: The Classical Hour

    In article <1169767090.972014.221510@a75g2000cwd.googlegroups. com>,
    chilly8@hotmail.com says...
    > My clients like me, beuase they know that if the buy time on my
    > network, that I will do everything possible to make it more difficult
    > for employers to block their programming from the workplace. They and
    > their adversiers expect their message to be heard.


    And you can't do anything to keep from being blocked by a quality setup
    that does not require any effort to block your service.

    There is no way any user could reach your content on any of the networks
    that we've designed, not, not even a hope of a chance. Now, since we're
    not the only people that properly configure network and firewalls, my
    guess is that you're only getting the people that don't care about
    security and don't care about lost productivity of their users abusing
    the company.

    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me

  6. Re: The Classical Hour

    X-No-Archive: Yes


    On Jan 25, 3:47 pm, Bogwitch wrote:
    > Why are you putting an email hearer in your posts?


    Its the new Google Groups, they wont let you put a nickname on, so
    it displays your Email address that you registered with.
    >
    > chil...@hotmail.com wrote:
    > > X-No-Archive: Yes[snip]

    >
    > > My clients like me, beuase they know that if the buy time on my
    > > network, that I will do everything possible to make it more difficult
    > > for employers to block their programming from the workplace. They and
    > > their adversiers expect their message to be heard.

    >You are not making it more difficult to block your programming, it is
    > trivial.
    >
    > Incidentally, of all the Internet connected system that I use/ manage at
    > work are not capable of receiving your content as you have described it.
    > This is not a reaction to your posts, but the standand configuration.
    > Streaming media is rarely used for work purposes. If it is required, it
    > is enabled on a case-by-case basis, to the site required.


    Well, a new show that is coming to the lineup ought to give network
    admins in the American South a few nightmares. The Country Joe hour
    will be coming to the lineup soon, and that drive admins south of the
    Mason Dizon Line crazy trying to stop people form listening, since the
    show is to feature tradtional and classic country music. If any
    broadcasts occur during the workday in the Southeastern USA, that will
    give network admins there a few headaches there.
    As I have siad before, I honor my clients requests. They, and their
    advertisers, want their messages heard, and I will do what it takes to
    ensure that happens. I found out I can actually set up an encrypted
    server with Tor, with can only be deciphred by the user running tor,
    and the "man in the middle" attack, thatr you have mentioned, would not
    work on a Tor-encrypted stream. All a user would have to do is install
    Tor, and then point to the encrypted stream. There will be a breather
    of a few weeks of my hectic travel schedule in covering skating, I will
    be heading for the data centre and installing the Tor server then. My
    clients have requested it, and I honour my clients requests. Bascially,
    the encrypted link will be another relay to Live 365, and the encrypted
    stream will be that much harder for employers to detect and block.


  7. Re: The Classical Hour

    In article <1169891269.276425.66810@a75g2000cwd.googlegroups.c om>,
    chilly8@hotmail.com says...
    > Well, a new show that is coming to the lineup ought to give network
    > admins in the American South a few nightmares.


    Wrong, by default, there is nothing you can do to get your show past our
    firewall, and I mean there is nothing you can do that would allow users
    on our clients network to reach your show. Oh, and we don't have to do
    anything no matter what you change.

    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me

  8. Re: The Classical Hour

    In article <1169891269.276425.66810@a75g2000cwd.googlegroups.c om>,
    chilly8@hotmail.com says...
    > Bascially,
    > the encrypted link will be another relay to Live 365, and the encrypted
    > stream will be that much harder for employers to detect and block.


    And by default any connection you build would be blocked by default in a
    standard secure firewall solution - so, no matter how many servers, as
    encryption means nothing, you put it on, they won't be able to reach it.

    Oh, and the connection is easy to spot - you seem to think that
    encryption or bit rate has something to do with it being harder to
    detect on an open network, but you're wrong.

    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me

  9. Re: The Classical Hour


    One item we cover that attracts people from Asian and middle
    eastern communities is our coverage of the Asian Games. When we
    covered the summer Asian Games in Qatar, in December, we did have
    people from Middle Eastern communities in Europe tuning into our
    coverage of the Games. With the winter version of the Games in China,
    this week, we do expect to see interest from people in Asian
    communities abroad. Since the the early events each day will be
    towards the end of the workday in Hawaii and California (where there
    are a LOT of Asians living), we would not be surprised if people
    logged on to listen to the Games and see how athletes from their
    homeland are doing.
    I do expect that network admins in Hawaii and Calfornia will be
    going crazy during the afternoons this week, when the morning events
    of the Asian Games are being broadcast on our network. I have had my
    network people make sure that our broadcasts cannot be detected and
    blocked by network admins in California and Hawaii, where there are
    sure to be a lot of Asian-Americans wanting to tune into the Games. We
    are doing everything possible to be sure that people in Asian
    communities worldwide can tune into the Games from work, and their
    activities cannot be detected of blocked.
    There are also a lot of people from Middle Eastern communties
    living in Europe, that will likely tune in. I know that during the
    summer Asian Games, last December, I saw a lot of hits from worlplaces
    in Europe. And since some of the events will be during the workday in
    Europe, I expect a lot of hits from middle eastern people living in
    Europe, during the Games, as my setup will allow them to tune in from
    work, without the boss knowing about it.



  10. Re: The Classical Hour

    chilly8@hotmail.com wrote:
    [snip]

    A lot of off topic spam.

    Bogwitch.

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