zone alarm and embedded objects - Firewalls

This is a discussion on zone alarm and embedded objects - Firewalls ; Hello, i use xp sp2 and zone alarm pro, From a couple of week zone alarm does not allow to open files embedded in pages, and it does not allow to use external program to open file such as pdf, ...

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  1. zone alarm and embedded objects

    Hello, i use xp sp2 and zone alarm pro,

    From a couple of week zone alarm does not allow to open files embedded in
    pages, and it does not allow to use external program to open file such as
    pdf, mpeg, avi and similar.
    Where exactly is the setting to turn off this feature?

    Thanx a lot for helping me.

    Max



  2. Re: zone alarm and embedded objects

    Max Crown wrote:
    > Hello, i use xp sp2 and zone alarm pro,


    Sincere condolences.

    Yours,
    VB.
    --
    The file name of an indirect node file is the string "iNode" immediately
    followed by the link reference converted to decimal text, with no leading
    zeroes. For example, an indirect node file with link reference 123 would
    have the name "iNode123". - HFS Plus Volume Format, MacOS X

  3. Re: zone alarm and embedded objects

    On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 18:45:36 +0200, Max Crown wrote:

    > Hello, i use xp sp2 and zone alarm pro,
    >
    > From a couple of week zone alarm does not allow to open files embedded in
    > pages, and it does not allow to use external program to open file such as
    > pdf, mpeg, avi and similar.
    > Where exactly is the setting to turn off this feature?
    >

    Go to:
    http://zonealarm.donhoover.net/uninstall.html

    Because:
    PFW Criticism.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persona...all#Criticisms

    "Personal Firewalls" are mostly snake-oil.
    http://www.samspade.org/d/firewalls.html

    Why your firewall sucks.
    http://tooleaky.zensoft.com/
    "But I quickly realized the truth: The added protection provided by
    outbound filtering is entirely illusory."

    Please note:
    For the average homeuser, the Windows Firewall in XP SP 2 does a fantastic
    job at its core mission and is really all you need if you have an
    'real-time' anti-virus program, [another firewall on your router or] other
    edge protection like SeconfigXP and practise safe-hex.
    The windows firewall deals with inbound protection and therefore does not
    give you a false sense of security. Best of all, it doesn't implement lots
    of nonsense like pretending that outbound traffic needs to be monitored.
    Activate and utilize the Win XP SP2 built-in Firewall; Uncheck *all*
    Programs and Services under the Exception tab.

    Read through:
    Understanding Windows Firewall.
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...2_wfintro.mspx

    Using Windows Firewall.
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...nfirewall.mspx

    How to manually open ports in Internet Connection Firewall in Windows XP.
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308127

    How to Configure Windows Firewall on a Single Computer.
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sec.../cfgfwall.mspx

    Troubleshooting Windows Firewall settings in Windows XP Service Pack 2.
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=875357

    At Least This Snake Oil Is Free.
    http://msinfluentials.com/blogs/jesp...l-is-free.aspx

    Deconstructing Common Security Myths.
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/tec...s/default.aspx
    Scroll down to:
    "Myth: Host-Based Firewalls Must Filter Outbound Traffic to be Safe."

    Exploring the windows Firewall.
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/tec...l/default.aspx
    "Outbound protection is security theaterˇXitˇ¦s a gimmick that only gives the
    impression of improving your security without doing anything that actually
    does improve your security."

    In conjunction with WinXP SP2 Firewall use:
    Seconfig XP 1.0
    http://seconfig.sytes.net/
    (http://www.softpedia.com/progDownloa...oad-39707.html)
    Seconfig XP is able configure Windows not to use TCP/IP as transport
    protocol for NetBIOS, SMB and RPC, thus leaving TCP/UDP ports 135, 137-139
    and 445 (the most exploited Windows networking weak point) closed.)
    OR
    Configuring NT-services much more secure.
    http://www.ntsvcfg.de/ntsvcfg_eng.html

    How Security Companies Sucker Us With Lemons.
    http://www.wired.com/politics/securi...tymatters_0419
    http://www.schneier.com/index.html

    Be guided accordingly!


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