Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies! - Firewalls

This is a discussion on Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies! - Firewalls ; X-No-Archive: Yes >> One use for my VPN server is when I go to countries that heavily >> censor the Internet. I can bypass the local censorship by using >> a VPN connection to my server elsewhere. Here is another ...

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Thread: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

  1. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    X-No-Archive: Yes

    >> One use for my VPN server is when I go to countries that heavily
    >> censor the Internet. I can bypass the local censorship by using
    >> a VPN connection to my server elsewhere.



    Here is another good use for VPN. Some in-flight Internet service
    block Skype (because they want you to use their EXPENSIVE
    "airfone" service). If I need to make a telephone call, I just VPN
    into my server, and then launch Skype through that. The airline
    would have no CLUE as to what I am doing, becuase the
    connection to my server is encrypted, and anyone on the
    flight crew trying to monitor the connection, with any packet
    sniffing, would just be getting a bunch of jibberish. If the airline
    decides to say, block Vongo, I can use VPN to get around that,
    and watch my OWN choice of movies, without having to pay
    extra to use the entertainment system on the plane. Just plug
    in my headphones, VPN into my server, connect to Vongo,
    sit back, relax, and enjoy. I use this, and other for-pay
    online movie services, to have my own choice of movies,
    often better than the airlines provide. Becuase of the
    secure connection, the airline would never know that I was
    watching my own choice of movies.

    The same thing in hotels, with in-room Internet. Some hotels
    block Skype, becuase they want you do make calls from
    the in-room phone, and pay hotel telephone surchages. I can
    VPN into my server, and launch Skype through there, and the
    hotel would NEVER know that I was bypassing their filtering
    of Skype, becuase the connection to my server is secure and
    cannot be eavesdropped upon by the hotel. Since a lot of
    business travellers also use VPN to connect to the office
    networks back home, the hotels don't DARE block VPN,
    unless they want to lose business travellers, which do make
    up a lot of their business.



  2. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    Chilly8 wrote:

    > X-No-Archive: Yes
    >
    >>> One use for my VPN server is when I go to countries that heavily
    >>> censor the Internet. I can bypass the local censorship by using
    >>> a VPN connection to my server elsewhere.

    >
    >
    > Here is another good use for VPN. Some in-flight Internet service
    > block Skype (because they want you to use their EXPENSIVE
    > "airfone" service). If I need to make a telephone call, I just VPN
    > into my server, and then launch Skype through that. The airline
    > would have no CLUE as to what I am doing, becuase the
    > connection to my server is encrypted, and anyone on the
    > flight crew trying to monitor the connection, with any packet
    > sniffing, would just be getting a bunch of jibberish. If the airline
    > decides to say, block Vongo, I can use VPN to get around that,
    > and watch my OWN choice of movies, without having to pay
    > extra to use the entertainment system on the plane.



    Are you really so stupid? This is exactly the reason why they block
    everything that looks pseudorandom, including compressed and encrypted data.

    > I can VPN into my server, and launch Skype through there, and the


    > hotel would NEVER know that I was bypassing their filtering
    > of Skype, becuase the connection to my server is secure and
    > cannot be eavesdropped upon by the hotel.



    Actually it's very trivial: Since you're abusing MSOE as a newsreader and
    probably as a mail client, as well as MSIE as a webbrowser, they can simply
    inject arbitrary code onto your computer, and then read everything outside
    of the encrypted communication channel.
    (And you couldn't even hold them responsible, since they're simply using the
    access you're actively offering to them.)

  3. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    X-No-Archive: Yes



    However, one point in the posts that got lost, is that I use VPN
    to avoid being detected by U.S. authorities, when I go to Cuba.
    I do feel, that since I live in Australia, I should NOT be compelled
    to comply with U.S. travel restrictions on Cuba, despite being a
    U.S./Australia dual national. By encrypted the outbound connection
    from Cuba, with a VPN tunnel, the spooks in Washington cannot
    eavesdrop on my communications, which allows me to cover my
    tracks, if I to go Cuba to broadcast sporting events.






  4. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    "Chilly8" wrote in news:ftrjmr$o0v$1@aioe.org:

    > If I need to make a telephone call, I just VPN
    > into my server, and then launch Skype through that. The airline
    > would have no CLUE as to what I am doing, becuase the
    > connection to my server is encrypted, and anyone on the
    > flight crew trying to monitor the connection, with any packet
    > sniffing, would just be getting a bunch of jibberish. If the airline
    > decides to say, block Vongo, I can use VPN to get around that,
    > and watch my OWN choice of movies, without having to pay
    > extra to use the entertainment system on the plane.


    Now you are admitting to violating FCC and FAA regulations by operating a
    computer with wireless turned on while in the air.

    There is a reason that devices that emit radio signals are not allowed to
    be used in flight.

    Do you realize that you may interfere with navigational instruments and
    cause the plane to crash?

    --
    bz

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

    bz+csm@ch100-5.chem.lsu.edu remove ch100-5 to avoid spam trap

  5. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    "Sebastian G." wrote in message
    news:66d4uvF2j67jjU1@mid.dfncis.de...
    > Chilly8 wrote:
    >
    >> X-No-Archive: Yes
    >>
    >>>> One use for my VPN server is when I go to countries that heavily
    >>>> censor the Internet. I can bypass the local censorship by using
    >>>> a VPN connection to my server elsewhere.

    >>
    >>
    >> Here is another good use for VPN. Some in-flight Internet service
    >> block Skype (because they want you to use their EXPENSIVE
    >> "airfone" service). If I need to make a telephone call, I just VPN
    >> into my server, and then launch Skype through that. The airline
    >> would have no CLUE as to what I am doing, becuase the
    >> connection to my server is encrypted, and anyone on the
    >> flight crew trying to monitor the connection, with any packet
    >> sniffing, would just be getting a bunch of jibberish. If the airline
    >> decides to say, block Vongo, I can use VPN to get around that,
    >> and watch my OWN choice of movies, without having to pay
    >> extra to use the entertainment system on the plane.

    >
    >
    > Are you really so stupid? This is exactly the reason why they block
    > everything that looks pseudorandom, including compressed and encrypted
    > data.
    >
    > > I can VPN into my server, and launch Skype through there, and the

    >
    >> hotel would NEVER know that I was bypassing their filtering
    >> of Skype, becuase the connection to my server is secure and
    >> cannot be eavesdropped upon by the hotel.

    >
    >
    > Actually it's very trivial: Since you're abusing MSOE as a newsreader and
    > probably as a mail client, as well as MSIE as a webbrowser, they can
    > simply


    MSOE is THE mail client for Windows, other than using Web-based
    systems from Hotmail, or for-pay webmail services from some ISPs.



  6. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    Chilly8 wrote, On 13/04/08 08:07:
    > "Sebastian G." wrote in message




    >> Actually it's very trivial: Since you're abusing MSOE as a newsreader and
    >> probably as a mail client, as well as MSIE as a webbrowser, they can
    >> simply

    >
    > MSOE is THE mail client for Windows, other than using Web-based
    > systems from Hotmail, or for-pay webmail services from some ISPs.


    Ah, that would explain why almost all businesses use something other
    than MSOE for email on their Windows machines.

    MSOE is merely one email client that MS provide, MS provide others and
    so do other SW companies and some of the alternatives are free.
    --
    Flash Gordon

  7. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    X-No-Archive: Yes

    "bz" wrote in message
    news:Xns9A7EE6AE03D6BWQAHBGMXSZHVspammote@130.39.1 98.139...
    > "Chilly8" wrote in news:ftrjmr$o0v$1@aioe.org:
    >
    >> If I need to make a telephone call, I just VPN
    >> into my server, and then launch Skype through that. The airline
    >> would have no CLUE as to what I am doing, becuase the
    >> connection to my server is encrypted, and anyone on the
    >> flight crew trying to monitor the connection, with any packet
    >> sniffing, would just be getting a bunch of jibberish. If the airline
    >> decides to say, block Vongo, I can use VPN to get around that,
    >> and watch my OWN choice of movies, without having to pay
    >> extra to use the entertainment system on the plane.

    >
    > Now you are admitting to violating FCC and FAA regulations by operating a
    > computer with wireless turned on while in the air.


    Nope, this is in-flight Internet provided by the AIRLINE that I am
    using, read the post. I am using VPN to circumvent the airline's
    firewall on their internet service, so I can aceess Skype. A
    number of airlines DO block Skype on their in-flight Internet,
    I am merely saying that I use a VPN tunnel into MY server,
    so I can get around the firewall and use Skype. The service
    I use is a LEGAL service provide by the airline, I just merely
    use my VPN system to thwart filtering, blocking, and
    monitoring, by the airline's IT staff.

    Now was far as LIGHT aircraft go (I do hold an Australian
    flying licence), it is NOT illegal for me to rent, say, a Cessna
    aircraft and take it up and scan the area for any open wireless
    networks, if I am going to be broadcasting a sporting event.

    Cessna 172 and 182 aircraft are actually the best light
    aircraft, that I have flown, for scanning an area for
    various kinds of wireless hotspots. It can be flown a
    fairly slow speed, and the optimum airspeed when
    scanning for WiFi networks as around 100 KIAS.
    The flaps-up stall speed is around 60KIAS, so
    I fly over the area around any arena or stadium
    holding the sporting event we want to broadcast,
    and fly at 80 to 100 KIAS airspeed. With
    a SuperCantenna, all kinds of WiFi hotspots,
    be they an unsecured router at a business or
    resident, of the various public hotspots at places
    like McDonalds, Starbucks, etc, etc,. can be
    found and logged rather quickly. And doing this
    from a light aircraft, such as a Cessna 172 or
    182 is LEGAL, as long as I follow whatever
    instructions are given by local air traffic control.



  8. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    bz wrote:
    > There is a reason that devices that emit radio signals are not allowed to
    > be used in flight.
    > Do you realize that you may interfere with navigational instruments and
    > cause the plane to crash?


    To be honest: these regulations are bull****.

    Not only once I forgot to switch off my mobile phone, because it was in
    my jacket. And I think, many people have the same problem.

    I don't think, that this ever will crash the plane - fortunately, people
    who are designing planes are not too dumb to implement appropriate
    shielding.

    These regulations are as dumb as the regulations, that you may not bring
    a tube of toothpaste into the plane.

    Yours,
    VB.
    --
    The file name of an indirect node file is the string "iNode" immediately
    followed by the link reference converted to decimal text, with no leading
    zeroes. For example, an indirect node file with link reference 123 would
    have the name "iNode123". - HFS Plus Volume Format, MacOS X

  9. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    Volker Birk wrote in news:4801c40a@news.uni-ulm.de:

    > bz wrote:
    >> There is a reason that devices that emit radio signals are not allowed
    >> to be used in flight.
    >> Do you realize that you may interfere with navigational instruments and
    >> cause the plane to crash?

    >
    > To be honest: these regulations are bull****.
    >
    > Not only once I forgot to switch off my mobile phone, because it was in
    > my jacket. And I think, many people have the same problem.
    >
    > I don't think, that this ever will crash the plane - fortunately, people
    > who are designing planes are not too dumb to implement appropriate
    > shielding.
    >


    It is not a matter of shielding. It is impossible to completely shield the
    passenger compartment so that no radio signals of any frequency can escape
    the box. Any signal that escapes could overpower an important signal that
    the aircraft depends on.

    > These regulations are as dumb as the regulations, that you may not bring
    > a tube of toothpaste into the plane.


    You are not qualified to determine if a particular device may cause a
    problem at a critical moment, even if you are an electronics engineer. It
    takes extensive testing to make sure that nothing a particular device
    radiates can interfere with the reception of any vital signals by any of
    the navigation devices.

    Imagine, for example, that the aircraft is landing under IFR (instrument
    flight rules) conditions when the ground can not be seen and the pilot is
    following the indicators that show the aircraft is following the glide
    path signals and some idiot fires up a cell phone. The interference causes
    the indicator to show that the aircraft is 50 feet higher than it actually
    is. The pilot corrects his approach and is now 50 feet below the
    glide-path.

    Makes a terrible mess in a field just short of the runway.

    It take thousands of hours of testing to 'clear' a specific device.
    Then what happens when the device malfunctions and radiates a signal on a
    different frequency?

    It is better to follow the rules. When you don't you are playing Russian
    roulette with the lives of everyone on the aircraft and people on the
    ground also.

    --
    bz

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

    bz+csm@ch100-5.chem.lsu.edu remove ch100-5 to avoid spam trap

  10. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    "Chilly8" wrote in news:ftsgah$mu5$1@aioe.org:

    >
    > X-No-Archive: Yes
    >
    > "bz" wrote in message
    > news:Xns9A7EE6AE03D6BWQAHBGMXSZHVspammote@130.39.1 98.139...
    >> "Chilly8" wrote in news:ftrjmr$o0v$1@aioe.org:
    >>
    >>> If I need to make a telephone call, I just VPN
    >>> into my server, and then launch Skype through that. The airline
    >>> would have no CLUE as to what I am doing, becuase the
    >>> connection to my server is encrypted, and anyone on the
    >>> flight crew trying to monitor the connection, with any packet
    >>> sniffing, would just be getting a bunch of jibberish. If the airline
    >>> decides to say, block Vongo, I can use VPN to get around that,
    >>> and watch my OWN choice of movies, without having to pay
    >>> extra to use the entertainment system on the plane.

    >>
    >> Now you are admitting to violating FCC and FAA regulations by operating
    >> a computer with wireless turned on while in the air.

    >
    > Nope, this is in-flight Internet provided by the AIRLINE that I am
    > using, read the post.


    You said NOTHING about using the aircraft's wired network connection to
    connect to the VPN. You just implied that the aircraft people's monopoly
    on communications made it expensive to use a cell phone. Sounded to me
    like you were bragging about using YOUR wireless from the aircraft. It
    WOULD be FREE and you would have tremendous range. ALL things you were
    crowing about.

    Since you pay for the in-flight network connectivity, by the minute, when
    you use the wired internet connection, you can use that any way you want,
    legally, provided that the material you are accessing is legal. They don't
    care if you skype via their broadband.

    > I am using VPN to circumvent the airline's
    > firewall on their internet service, so I can aceess Skype. A
    > number of airlines DO block Skype on their in-flight Internet,
    > I am merely saying that I use a VPN tunnel into MY server,
    > so I can get around the firewall and use Skype. The service
    > I use is a LEGAL service provide by the airline, I just merely
    > use my VPN system to thwart filtering, blocking, and
    > monitoring, by the airline's IT staff.
    >
    > Now was far as LIGHT aircraft go (I do hold an Australian
    > flying licence), it is NOT illegal for me to rent, say, a Cessna
    > aircraft and take it up and scan the area for any open wireless
    > networks, if I am going to be broadcasting a sporting event.


    When you are the pilot, you can LISTEN all you like, as long as you don't
    listen on cell phone frequencies or certain other frequencies. And as the
    pilot of the aircraft, you can even operate any legal transmitting
    equipment for which you have the proper license, or give someone else
    permission to operate it.


    .....




    --
    bz

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

    bz+csm@ch100-5.chem.lsu.edu remove ch100-5 to avoid spam trap

  11. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    Chilly8 wrote:


    >>> I can VPN into my server, and launch Skype through there, and the
    >>> hotel would NEVER know that I was bypassing their filtering
    >>> of Skype, becuase the connection to my server is secure and
    >>> cannot be eavesdropped upon by the hotel.

    >>
    >> Actually it's very trivial: Since you're abusing MSOE as a newsreader and
    >> probably as a mail client, as well as MSIE as a webbrowser, they can
    >> simply

    >
    > MSOE is THE mail client for Windows,



    Aside from the fact that it's even properly support the RFC from the Mail
    Message format, there're a dozen of real mail clients for Windows. Neither
    did your statement bring any accuse for the inherent security flaws which
    make it unsuitable for usage in almost any scenario; much less does it stop
    anyone from simply exploiting it.

    > other than using Web-based


    > systems from Hotmail, or for-pay webmail services from some ISPs.



    And you don't even know GMX. How stupid.

  12. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    Volker Birk wrote:


    > These regulations are as dumb as the regulations, that you may not bring
    > a tube of toothpaste into the plane.



    The latest recurse on this topic: You're allowed to bring methanol cell
    based accumulators for your laptop onto the plane. And the lighter as well.

  13. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    Jens Hoffmann wrote in
    news:ftqt6e$biq$1@murphy.mediascape.de:

    > Hi,
    >
    >>> Legalities aside: Do you want to transmit data or fry birds?

    >>
    >> "fry birds"? What is that crack supposed to mean?

    >
    > FCC in the US allows a maximum of 4W ERP.
    > http://www.moonblinkwifi.com/dbm_to_watt_conversion.cfm
    > http://www.topatec.com/pwr_db.htm
    >
    > The amount of energy you supposedly use is dangerous.


    Yes. I worked on radars for a living and I would never expose myself to the
    power levels he is citing.

    >
    > I still think, you cannot calculate a pringles antenna correctly.
    >
    > Pretty consistent with the rest of your fantasies, though.


    Yes. And he is mistaken in his statements. The power amps that I see for
    sale are 'for export and sale to licensed amateur radio operators and
    military ONLY'. They are NOT allowed for domestic use.

    The FCC also has RF exposure limits based on safety studies.
    http://www.fcc.gov/oet/rfsafety/cellpcs.html
    and this gives important guideline formula:
    http://mrtmag.com/mag/radio_predicting_power_density/

    Luckily, the pringle can antenna has a NEGATIVE gain of about -9 db over
    a 1/4 wave antenna.
    http://www.csvhfs.org/ant/CSANT02.HTML.

    If our troll were really knowledgeable, he would get rid of the pringle
    can antenna and use a 12" x 12" pyramidal horn. Then he could throw away
    his power amplifier too.

    Of course, the pringle can antenna IS better than the typical 'built in'
    antenna in your laptop or wireless card.



    --
    bz

    please pardon my infinite ignorance, the set-of-things-I-do-not-know is an
    infinite set.

    bz+csm@ch100-5.chem.lsu.edu remove ch100-5 to avoid spam trap

  14. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    Chilly8 wrote:
    > X-No-Archive: Yes
    >
    >
    > "bz" wrote in message
    > news:Xns9A7C5418EC349WQAHBGMXSZHVspammote@130.39.1 98.139...
    >> "Chilly8" wrote in news:ftkvo0$3ev$1@aioe.org:
    >>
    >>> X-No-Archive: Yes
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Leythos" wrote in message
    >>> news:MPG.2267c2dc32c964d9896b8@adfree.usenet.com.. .
    >>>> In article , chilly8@hotmail.com says...
    >>>>> I merely set up a VPN tunnel, where
    >>>>> someone can log onto my machine, and have all my server handling
    >>>>> all the traffic.
    >>>> And it stand out in a firewall like a flare on a dark night - even
    >>>> easier to spot than a proxy connection.
    >>> One use for my VPN server is when I go to countries that heavily
    >>> censor the Internet. I can bypass the local censorship by using
    >>> a VPN connection to my server elsewhere. With the strong
    >>> encryption, I cannot be monitored by government censors,
    >>> very handy when I go to China, or Cuba, an average of once
    >>> a year to broadcast figure skating events. I completely bypass
    >>> the local censors, since the connection cannot be analysed,
    >>> cracked, monitored, or sniffed. If, say, Hotmail, is blocked,
    >>> I can VPN to my server,. and log on to Hotmail that way,
    >>> and the local government censors will NEVER know what I
    >>> am up to.
    >>>
    >>> If I want to read certain blocked Western news sources, while
    >>> in China, such as the BBC, or CNN, or a few Australian
    >>> news outlets, I can do that, and there is no POSSIBLE way
    >>> the censors in China would know what I was up to, becuase
    >>> of the encrypted connection to my server. So I can do pretty
    >>> much what I want, no matter what part of the world I go to,
    >>> and local censors cannot monitor me.

    >> You could get someone jailed or killed.

    >
    >> As I said, you could be in danger yourself and those that use your service
    >> could be in danger.

    >
    > Not me, I would not be in danger. A local person, maybe, but not me,
    > as a foreigner. With an encrypted connection, whether I am in
    > China, Cuba, or censorious Middle Eastern countires, there is
    > no POSSIBLE way I can be monitored, becuase of the encryption.
    >
    > Since Live 365 is blocked in Iran, I use my VPN, if I go there,
    > to log in and check on the Live 365 feed for my station, and
    > the Mullahs in Iran have no CLUE as to WHAT I am up to.
    > Both Live 365 and LoudCity are blocked, in Iran, but I use
    > my VPN connection to bypass the Mullahs, and check on
    > my station.
    >
    > I also use it in Britan and the U.S., becuase of the warrantless
    > monitoring of communications in both countries, that is apparently
    > even more than the afforentioned censorious regimes in Cuba,
    > China, etc. By using an enrypted connection, Mi-6 in Britain,
    > or Homeland Security in America cannot snoop on my
    > communications, becusae of the heavy crypto. The government
    > spooks in America and Britain cannot monitor me, when I use
    > my VPN connection. All Mi-6 and Homeland Security know
    > is that I am making an encrypted connection to my server, via
    > a VPN link, but that is ALL either DHS or MI-6 would
    > know.
    >
    >

    MI-6 ???
    it's MI-5
    MI-6 is ian flemings' creation

  15. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    X-No-Archive: Yes


    "Chilly8" wrote in message
    news:ftrjmr$o0v$1@aioe.org...
    >
    > X-No-Archive: Yes
    >
    >>> One use for my VPN server is when I go to countries that heavily
    >>> censor the Internet. I can bypass the local censorship by using
    >>> a VPN connection to my server elsewhere.

    >
    >
    > Here is another good use for VPN.


    And then there is other kinds of filtering. Becuase of pressure
    from rights-holders, some ISPs, including in Austtralia, are
    blocking P2P television networks (PPLive, TVants, etc, etc),
    based out of China. I can get around such blocks by running
    a VPN into my server, at a colocation centre which does not
    block any kind of P2P, and be able to watch any kind of sports
    event, when I am home and not travelling. The connection to
    my server, located outside of Australia, is secure, and what I am
    doing cannot be monitored by my ISP through packet-sniffing.
    All they would know is that I am making a heavily encrypted
    connection to my server, but the contents are encrypted, so I
    can, say, watch prime time TV from America, on channels are
    are rebroadcast through these networks, and my Australian
    ISP will NEVER know WHAT I am up to.

    I watch major league baseball games from America, via
    P2P television networks, and my ISP, in Australia, would
    NEVER know what I was up to.



  16. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!

    bz wrote:
    >> These regulations are as dumb as the regulations, that you may not bring
    >> a tube of toothpaste into the plane.

    > You are not qualified to determine if a particular device may cause a
    > problem at a critical moment, even if you are an electronics engineer. It
    > takes extensive testing to make sure that nothing a particular device
    > radiates can interfere with the reception of any vital signals by any of
    > the navigation devices.


    How can you ensure, that all electronic devices in passengers' area are
    switched off?

    You can't.

    And does that mean, that plane crashes increased dramatically with the
    real dramatic increase of portable electronic devices in the last years?

    Fortunately, planes seem not to be build as dumb as you're suggesting.

    > Imagine, for example, that the aircraft is landing under IFR (instrument
    > flight rules) conditions when the ground can not be seen and the pilot is
    > following the indicators that show the aircraft is following the glide
    > path signals and some idiot fires up a cell phone. The interference causes
    > the indicator to show that the aircraft is 50 feet higher than it actually
    > is. The pilot corrects his approach and is now 50 feet below the
    > glide-path.


    Then IFR would be unusable now, because I bet, that in every plane
    at least one mobile phone was forgotten to be switched off. And any
    of these mobile phones are sending at the time of landing, because
    they're connecting to the cell there.

    > It is better to follow the rules.


    Yes. This is just the same thing as with the toothpaste. Follow the
    rules. This is what we all do, hoping that we're wrong and people are
    not implementing rules, which are just crazy.

    Yours,
    VB.
    --
    The file name of an indirect node file is the string "iNode" immediately
    followed by the link reference converted to decimal text, with no leading
    zeroes. For example, an indirect node file with link reference 123 would
    have the name "iNode123". - HFS Plus Volume Format, MacOS X

  17. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    "goarilla <"kevinpaulus|"@|skynet" <"punt> wrote in message
    news:480242bc$0$2984$ba620e4c@news.skynet.be...
    >> I also use it in Britan and the U.S., becuase of the warrantless
    >> monitoring of communications in both countries, that is apparently
    >> even more than the afforentioned censorious regimes in Cuba,
    >> China, etc. By using an enrypted connection, Mi-6 in Britain,
    >> or Homeland Security in America cannot snoop on my
    >> communications, becusae of the heavy crypto. The government
    >> spooks in America and Britain cannot monitor me, when I use
    >> my VPN connection. All Mi-6 and Homeland Security know
    >> is that I am making an encrypted connection to my server, via
    >> a VPN link, but that is ALL either DHS or MI-6 would
    >> know.
    >>
    >>

    > MI-6 ???
    > it's MI-5
    > MI-6 is ian flemings' creation


    Oh really?
    http://www.mi6.gov.uk/output/Page50.html



  18. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    X-No-Archive: Yes


    "bz" wrote in message
    news:Xns9A7F5F40442BCWQAHBGMXSZHVspammote@130.39.1 98.139...
    > Jens Hoffmann wrote in
    > news:ftqt6e$biq$1@murphy.mediascape.de:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >>>> Legalities aside: Do you want to transmit data or fry birds?
    >>>
    >>> "fry birds"? What is that crack supposed to mean?

    >>
    >> FCC in the US allows a maximum of 4W ERP.
    >> http://www.moonblinkwifi.com/dbm_to_watt_conversion.cfm
    >> http://www.topatec.com/pwr_db.htm
    >>
    >> The amount of energy you supposedly use is dangerous.

    >
    > Yes. I worked on radars for a living and I would never expose myself to
    > the
    > power levels he is citing.
    >
    >>
    >> I still think, you cannot calculate a pringles antenna correctly.
    >>
    >> Pretty consistent with the rest of your fantasies, though.

    >
    > Yes. And he is mistaken in his statements. The power amps that I see for
    > sale are 'for export and sale to licensed amateur radio operators and
    > military ONLY'. They are NOT allowed for domestic use.


    well, I have a power amp that is desguised, and I have no problem
    with Customs when travelling to America. You see, I am a
    borderline diabetic, and have to check my blood sugar at times,
    so I have the power amp concealed inside my blood glucose
    monitor. To Customs, it will appear to be a glucose monitor
    that can check your blood suger level, but the power amp
    is concealed inside the glucose monitor. Customs is NEVER the wiser,
    and I have NO problem with Customs, whenever I enter the
    United States.

    That is how you get a device into the U.S., you desguise it
    as something else. I even have a GPS jammer, deguised as
    an Walkman casette stereo. It will even play tapes and pick
    up the local radio stations, but there is a GPS jammer
    concealed inside the unit (GPS jammers are illegal in Britain).
    I use it to jam the GPS-based tracking units in rental cars.
    The British authorites have no CLUE that I am bringing a
    GPS jammer. GPS jammers are also illegal under state
    laws in 3 U.S. states (California, Georgia, and Florida)

    GPS jammers are also handy when going to Mexico. I
    did cover a figure skating event in Ensenada, Mexico,
    about 6 years ago. So the hire company would not know
    that I took the car into Mexico, and this charge me
    $1/mile (ouch!!) surcharge for every mile driven in
    Mexico, I simply used the GPS jammer to prevent the
    tracking device from getting the GPS signal, and, thus,
    it was unable to report back the coordinates of where
    it was. The only way to Ensenada is to fly to either
    LAX or San Diego, and then drive the rest of the way.
    Desguising the GPS jammer also helps if I am ever stopped
    by a police officer in California. That cop will NEVER know
    I have a GPS jammer, in violation of California State Law,
    becuase it is deguised as a cheap Walkman stereo that can
    play tapes and pick up the local radio stations.

    The laws in California and Geogia have to do with the
    "anklets" that probationers and people on bail awaiting
    trial often have to wear. Because a GPS jammer can interfere
    with such devices, it has been declared illegal in California
    and Georgia, and the Florida law has to do with stricter
    laws regarding unlicensed radio transmitters,



  19. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    X-No-Archive: Yes

    "Chilly8" wrote in message
    news:ftue9q$al0$1@aioe.org...
    >
    > X-No-Archive: Yes
    >
    >
    > "Chilly8" wrote in message
    > news:ftrjmr$o0v$1@aioe.org...
    >>
    >> X-No-Archive: Yes
    >>
    >>>> One use for my VPN server is when I go to countries that heavily
    >>>> censor the Internet. I can bypass the local censorship by using
    >>>> a VPN connection to my server elsewhere.

    >>
    >>
    >> Here is another good use for VPN.

    >
    > And then there is other kinds of filtering. Becuase of pressure
    > from rights-holders, some ISPs, including in Austtralia, are
    > blocking P2P television networks (PPLive, TVants, etc, etc),
    > based out of China. I can get around such blocks by running
    > a VPN into my server, at a colocation centre which does not
    > block any kind of P2P, and be able to watch any kind of sports



    Speaking of P2P television, VPN is also wise to use, when in
    England, becuase you don't know if the establishment is a
    scofflaw that has in-room tellies with a TV Licence, and
    changes to the law in 2004 requite a TV Licence to watch
    online television as well. In the time of the pound and Euro
    rising against virtually every other worldwide currency,
    I find that B&B inns a better value when in England. To
    avoid being fined, in the event a particular B&B I am staying
    in does not have a TV Licence, I VPN into my server, whenever
    I want to watch any online TV, so that the authorities in Britain
    cannot monitor what I am doing. The encryption keeps me
    from incurring what would be a fine of about 2200 AUD,
    at current exchange rates, for watching online TV without
    a TV Licence. So I I want to watch programming, from,
    say, 9 Network (which is sometimes available on some
    P2P TV Networks) from back home in Australia, or if
    I want to watch a baseball game from America, on the
    Internet, the British authorties will NEVER know what
    I am up to

    The are some scofflaws, among B&B inns, that offer
    TV without a TV Licence. Using an encrypted connection
    to my server ouside of Britain keeps ME from incurring
    any liability, should the particular establishment I am
    staying at ever be busted my TV Licensing for not
    having a TV Licence.



  20. Re: Free MySpace, Facebook, YouTube Proxies!


    X-No-Archive: Yes


    "Sebastian G." wrote in message
    news:63tp90F28tb3rU1@mid.dfncis.de...
    > Chilly8 wrote:
    >
    >> X-No-Archive: Yes
    >>
    >>
    >> "bz" wrote in message
    >> news:Xns9A6092CEC9DDWQAHBGMXSZHVspammote@130.39.19 8.139...
    >>> "Chilly8" wrote in news:frboh0$ndn$1@aioe.org:
    >>>
    >>>> My proxy is an entry proxy to Tor. Since Tor has its own encryption,
    >>>> there is no possible way for me, or anyone else, to monitor the
    >>>> packets. Tor uses military-grade encryption.
    >>> Packets in the clear enter your machine from your 'clients'.
    >>>
    >>> Your machine encrypts them and sends them to Tor.
    >>> Tor responds and your machine decrypts them and sends them out in the
    >>> clear
    >>> to your 'clients'.
    >>>
    >>> What, exactly, keeps you from running netshark (or even a fork into a
    >>> file)
    >>> on the data stream between you and your clients?

    >>
    >> There is no POSSIBLE way that I could monitor was is being sent, if
    >> if I WANTED to.

    >
    >
    > Nonsense.
    >
    >> I periodically purge the logs and overwrite

    >
    >
    > Which doesn't limit to read the data from memory in any way,
    >
    >> with Evidence Eliminator

    >
    >
    > And will you ****ward finally understand the Evidence Eliminator is a
    > horribly broken piece of **** that leaves a lot of data it's supposed to
    > overwrite!
    >
    > > Contrary to popular opinion, If you use EE running the

    >
    >> DOD spec for data destruction, there is NO forensic technique in
    >> existance that is going to recover the data.

    >
    >
    > There is a very trivial forensic technique: dd if=/dev/hdXY | grep "search
    > term". Because EE doesn't overwrite the data as intended.


    Actually, software programs, such as EE, are good enough to foil
    forensic searches by U.S. Customs, at the border. Many
    coporations that send the employess on international business
    trips are now issuing their employess "forensicaly cleaned"
    laptops, as the EFF puts it, so that the spooks in homeland
    security that inspect computers that enter or re-enter the
    U.S. cannot get any trade secrets or any other data that they
    don't want DHS to get their hands on. While one EFF article
    does not mention EE, specifically, it does mention that companies
    are using disk-wiping software to scrub the disks of any company
    laptops, before they eventually have to go through a U.S.
    Customs inspection before returning to America. Corporate
    America seems to trust this kind of software to evade DHS
    snoops, at the borders. If corporate America trusts this
    software to avoid U.S. Customs recovering any data, then
    so do I.

    We do the same here at the radio station, with our equipment
    before it ever goes through any U.S. Customs inspection. EE
    is used, at maximum level of destruction, to scrub the hard
    disks, so that DHS will not be able to recover deleted data,
    when the equipment is brought into America.



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