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This is a discussion on Linux for medical applications, validation? - Embedded ; Hi I am looking for information about the use of Linux in medical application / instruments. Has a version of Linux f.ex. been validated and accepted by the FDA for use in medical instrumentation. Espceially primary devices are critical (the ...

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  1. Linux for medical applications, validation?

    Hi

    I am looking for information about the use of Linux in medical application /
    instruments.
    Has a version of Linux f.ex. been validated and accepted by the FDA for use
    in medical instrumentation. Espceially primary devices are critical (the
    doctor decides threatment of the patient directly on the information from
    the instrument and a wrong measurement/display can kill the patient).

    Any help/information is highly appreciated!

    Best regards

    Kasper



  2. Re: Linux for medical applications, validation?

    On Sep 5, 6:53 pm, "KMP" wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > I am looking for information about the use of Linux in medical application /
    > instruments.
    > Has a version of Linux f.ex. been validated and accepted by the FDA for use
    > in medical instrumentation. Espceially primary devices are critical (the
    > doctor decides threatment of the patient directly on the information from
    > the instrument and a wrong measurement/display can kill the patient).
    >
    > Any help/information is highly appreciated!
    >
    > Best regards
    >
    > Kasper


    >From what I've read, most companies would use a bona fide RTOS/psudo

    HW (eg:FPGA) for the critical paths of their medical/aviation
    instruments. They will run Linux as a thread within that RTOS
    environment, and it will be used to provide all auxiliary services
    (bells and whistles) such as network access, report storage, remote
    operation etc...
    Also I've heard that some companies provides Real-Time, Proprietary
    streams of linux for second level medical applications. Try companies
    like Green Hills. But have not heard linux being used for primary
    medical/aviation devices yet. If anyone knows of one please drop in a
    post. I am interested in such an implementation since I work in
    second level medical instruments.
    Cheers
    Janaka


  3. Re: Linux for medical applications, validation?

    Google groups are playing funny buggers with my post: It should have
    read :

    My understanding is that most critical medical/aviation apps will run
    a bonafide RTOS or HW (eg:FPGA) for the critical paths of their
    medical/aviation
    instruments. They will run Linux as a thread within that RTOS
    environment, and it will be used to provide all auxiliary services
    (bells and whistles) such as network access, report storage, remote
    operation etc...
    Also I've heard that some companies provides Real-Time, Proprietary
    streams of linux for second level medical applications. Try companies
    like Green Hills. But have not heard linux being used for primary
    medical/aviation devices yet. If anyone knows of one please drop in a
    post. I am interested in such an implementation since I work in
    second level medical instruments.
    Cheers
    Janaka


  4. Re: Linux for medical applications, validation?

    Thanks for the information! If I find out more will I let you know

    Cheers
    Kasper

    "Janaka" wrote in message
    news:1189040028.024834.204260@g4g2000hsf.googlegro ups.com...
    > Google groups are playing funny buggers with my post: It should have
    > read :
    >
    > My understanding is that most critical medical/aviation apps will run
    > a bonafide RTOS or HW (eg:FPGA) for the critical paths of their
    > medical/aviation
    > instruments. They will run Linux as a thread within that RTOS
    > environment, and it will be used to provide all auxiliary services
    > (bells and whistles) such as network access, report storage, remote
    > operation etc...
    > Also I've heard that some companies provides Real-Time, Proprietary
    > streams of linux for second level medical applications. Try companies
    > like Green Hills. But have not heard linux being used for primary
    > medical/aviation devices yet. If anyone knows of one please drop in a
    > post. I am interested in such an implementation since I work in
    > second level medical instruments.
    > Cheers
    > Janaka
    >




  5. Re: Linux for medical applications, validation?

    On Wed, 5 Sep 2007 10:53:40 +0200, KMP wrote:


    >Hi


    >I am looking for information about the use of Linux in medical application /
    >instruments.
    >Has a version of Linux f.ex. been validated and accepted by the FDA for use
    >in medical instrumentation. Espceially primary devices are critical (the
    >doctor decides threatment of the patient directly on the information from
    >the instrument and a wrong measurement/display can kill the patient).


    No
    ****ing
    Way.

    Don't use linux. Don't use windows. Don't use Unix/Solaris/AIX.
    Don't use anything that you can't fit in 32K or that hasn't been gone over
    in brutal detail.

    The more complex the OS, the more bugs and in a medical device, it could be
    life threatening.

  6. Re: Linux for medical applications, validation?

    If you _want_ to use Linux and you _need_ an approved OS, you need to
    run both side by side. This is possible using a virtualization manager.
    The one I know about is PikeOS by www.sysgo.com.

    -Michael

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