Problems installing a bootp server - Embedded

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Thread: Problems installing a bootp server

  1. Problems installing a bootp server

    Hi

    I want to gather some embedded developing experience by using an old
    pc as a target and my laptop with SuSE Linux as a development host. I
    want to load the root fs on the target with nfs.
    My tutorial book (basing on a very old 2.2.19 kernel) tells me to
    configure the bootp server in the /etc/inetd.conf. I didn't find any
    bootps executable on my SuSE 9.1 installation. Therefore I tried to
    install the bootp-DD2 with YaST. But this did not install any
    executable. It only installed some files in the
    /usr/share/doc/bootp-DD2 directory. There also lack a lot of files
    mentioned in the README within this directory, as e.g. the makefile.
    Do I really first have to build the bootp-DD2 or did I fail installing
    with YaST (I checked the box: automatic check for dependencies)?

    Furthermore the tutorial tells me bootp is searching for the ip
    configurations in the /etc/bootptab that is also missing on my SuSE
    installation. Any suggestions or guidance for a good short primer for
    bootp, nfs, better dedicated discussion groups ... ?

    TIA
    Hans-Joerg

  2. Re: Problems installing a bootp server

    Hello Hans!

    Hans-Joerg Wagner wrote:
    > I want to gather some embedded developing experience by using an old
    > pc as a target and my laptop with SuSE Linux as a development host. I
    > want to load the root fs on the target with nfs.


    I would suggest to put etherboot on your target....
    There is plenty of documentation on the net, and it is simple to set up.

    best regards
    Wolfgang


  3. Re: Problems installing a bootp server

    Wolfgang Mes wrote in message news:...
    > Hello Hans!
    >
    > Hans-Joerg Wagner wrote:
    > > I want to gather some embedded developing experience by using an old
    > > pc as a target and my laptop with SuSE Linux as a development host. I
    > > want to load the root fs on the target with nfs.

    >
    > I would suggest to put etherboot on your target....
    > There is plenty of documentation on the net, and it is simple to set up.
    >
    > best regards
    > Wolfgang


    Thanks Wolfgang

    but as I am a very newbie, I prefer to stay step by step with my
    tutorial labs. But if nobody has other ideas I will be forced to use
    your recommendation.

    BTW: Doesn't etherboot to be put on the host, if the target has to
    catch its fs over nfs?

    TIA
    Hans-Joerg

  4. Re: Problems installing a bootp server

    In article ,
    nickiundhj@hispeed.ch (Hans-Joerg Wagner) writes:
    > Wolfgang Mes wrote in message news:...
    >> Hello Hans!
    >>
    >> Hans-Joerg Wagner wrote:
    >> > I want to gather some embedded developing experience by using an old
    >> > pc as a target and my laptop with SuSE Linux as a development host. I
    >> > want to load the root fs on the target with nfs.

    >>
    >> I would suggest to put etherboot on your target....
    >> There is plenty of documentation on the net, and it is simple to set up.
    >>
    >> best regards
    >> Wolfgang

    >
    > Thanks Wolfgang
    >
    > but as I am a very newbie, I prefer to stay step by step with my
    > tutorial labs. But if nobody has other ideas I will be forced to use
    > your recommendation.
    >
    > BTW: Doesn't etherboot to be put on the host, if the target has to
    > catch its fs over nfs?


    You put the etherboot sources on the host and compile them to create
    an etherboot binary which is suitable for your target. However, for
    common configurations (such as your "old PC") you can quite conveniently
    configure and download a suitable etherboot image online (just go to
    www.rom-o-matic.net). The easiest way to use etherboot with an old PC
    is to create a floppy boot image so that the PC loads etherboot from
    floppy.

    Note that etherboot has nothing to do with the filesystem: it is only
    responsible for loading a kernel via network, similar to the way LILO
    or GRUB load the kernel from harddisk. How the kernel accesses its
    root FS after being loaded is entirely up to that the kernel.

    The procedure is roughly as follows:

    - The target wakes up from reset or power on. After doing its
    initialization stuff (BIOS), it runs the etherboot program.

    - Etherboot only knows the NIC's MAC address. It broadcasts
    BOOTP and/or DHCP (depending on how etherboot was configured)
    requests on the network.

    - This is where your hotst's bootpd enters the picture: in response
    to these BOOTP requests from the target, a bootp server checks its
    database (the /etc/bootptab file) for an entry matching the MAC
    address of the target that issued the request.

    - if it finds a matching entry, it sends the network configuration
    info attached to it to the target. This info contains a lot of
    tags, many of which are optional ("man bootptab" for details). The
    info however must be sufficient for the target to configure its
    network interface (i.e. IP address, mask, gateway, ...) and to
    request a boot file (IP/hostname of TFTP server, location of
    boot file on that server ...).

    - With that information, the etherboot program on the target
    configures its network interface and then sends TFTP requests
    to its designated TFTP server to load the designated boot file
    (containing the Linux kernel).

    - After the boot file was loaded to RAM, etherboot passes control to
    it.

    Note that the DHCP protocal is a superset of BOOTP, so you could as
    well set up a DHCP server instead of a BOOTP one (this is probably
    the reason why SuSE do not seem to provide a functional BOOTP server
    package). Both these protocols are only responsible for passing
    network configuration parameters to the target upon request. The actual
    boot is then done via TFTP (which means that in addition to a BOOTP or
    DHCP server, you also need to set up a TFTP server).

    Once the target has successfully booted the kernel, that kernel needs
    to mount a root filesystem. For a diskless system, this can either be
    an NFS filesystem (which would imply that you also need to run an NFS
    server), or it can be an initial RAMDISK image which was booted along
    with the kernel image.

    Also see the mknbi manpage. If it is missing you need to install
    that tool as well.


    Rob

    --
    Robert Kaiser email: rkaiser AT sysgo DOT com
    SYSGO AG http://www.elinos.com
    Klein-Winternheim / Germany http://www.sysgo.com


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