Re: bind hassles - DNS

This is a discussion on Re: bind hassles - DNS ; lsof is a wonderful tool on unix type machines. You can get it from ftp://lsof.itap.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/lsof/ It lists open files (and, if run by a superuser account) for all processes (or just the uid that is running it if non-root). Since, ...

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Thread: Re: bind hassles

  1. Re: bind hassles

    lsof is a wonderful tool on unix type machines.
    You can get it from ftp://lsof.itap.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/lsof/

    It lists open files (and, if run by a superuser account) for all
    processes (or just the uid that is running it if non-root).
    Since, in Unix, everything is a file, this includes ports,
    configuration files, memory, devices, current directories, and
    everything else.
    So...
    to find if a name server is running:
    lsof | grep TCP | grep 53
    would list the process (regardless of name) that has port 53 open (and
    if it's not listening on 53, it's probably not a very good name
    server).

    For whatever other services, you could do the same thing. Once you know
    the process name (usually the first column in the lsof output), you can
    run a lsof | grep , and that will show you everything
    that the process has open.
    -Drew Schatt

    On Oct 11, 2004, at 7:14 AM, Billy K wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I have been given documentation that states bind is running on a
    > server. As
    > far as I can tell I cannot see it as a running process while running
    > ps -aux, unless its currently stopped.
    >
    > How do I tell if this is infact install and operational. Can anyone
    > suggest
    > anything. I'll be doing this for a range of other software just to
    > attempt
    > to document what is running and where all the configuration files are.
    > For
    > example apache, samaba, squid, mysql, and other apps.
    >
    > Is there an easy way of knowing what is running on each server and
    > where all
    > configuration and source installation files are.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >




  2. Re: bind hassles

    schatt@schatt.com (Drew Schatt) wrote in message news:...
    > lsof is a wonderful tool on unix type machines.
    > You can get it from ftp://lsof.itap.purdue.edu/pub/tools/unix/lsof/
    >
    > It lists open files (and, if run by a superuser account) for all
    > processes (or just the uid that is running it if non-root).
    > Since, in Unix, everything is a file, this includes ports,
    > configuration files, memory, devices, current directories, and
    > everything else.
    > So...
    > to find if a name server is running:
    > lsof | grep TCP | grep 53
    > would list the process (regardless of name) that has port 53 open (and
    > if it's not listening on 53, it's probably not a very good name
    > server).
    >
    > For whatever other services, you could do the same thing. Once you know
    > the process name (usually the first column in the lsof output), you can
    > run a lsof | grep , and that will show you everything
    > that the process has open.
    > -Drew Schatt


    Lsof has many filtering options that support searches without
    the need to pipe output to grep. The -i option is particularly
    useful for locating a port and protocol (or port) usage. The
    above example could be written:

    $ lsof -iTCP:53

    or, to search for all protocols:

    $ lsof -i:53

    or, to use service names:

    $ lsof -itcp:domain

    Vic Abell, lsof author

    > On Oct 11, 2004, at 7:14 AM, Billy K wrote:
    >
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I have been given documentation that states bind is running on a
    > > server. As
    > > far as I can tell I cannot see it as a running process while running
    > > ps -aux, unless its currently stopped.
    > >
    > > How do I tell if this is infact install and operational. Can anyone
    > > suggest
    > > anything. I'll be doing this for a range of other software just to
    > > attempt
    > > to document what is running and where all the configuration files are.
    > > For
    > > example apache, samaba, squid, mysql, and other apps.
    > >
    > > Is there an easy way of knowing what is running on each server and
    > > where all
    > > configuration and source installation files are.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >


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