Plural of PACS? - DICOM

This is a discussion on Plural of PACS? - DICOM ; This is a stylistic question. If I want to refer to one or more PACS collectively, what is the plural? PACS? PACSs? PACSes?...

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  1. Plural of PACS?

    This is a stylistic question. If I want to refer to one or more PACS
    collectively, what is the plural? PACS? PACSs? PACSes?


  2. Re: Plural of PACS?

    I've seen PACS and PACSs for plural. Never seen PACSes, although
    ironically, I think that would be correct if you ask an English teacher :-)

    Lint


    Mike Henderson wrote:
    > This is a stylistic question. If I want to refer to one or more PACS
    > collectively, what is the plural? PACS? PACSs? PACSes?
    >


  3. Re: Plural of PACS?

    Since the Plural of TLA is TLAs (or so i see it written all the time)
    I would agree it would be PACSs



    On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 17:58:52 GMT, Lint Radley
    wrote:

    >I've seen PACS and PACSs for plural. Never seen PACSes, although
    >ironically, I think that would be correct if you ask an English teacher :-)
    >
    >Lint
    >
    >
    >Mike Henderson wrote:
    >> This is a stylistic question. If I want to refer to one or more PACS
    >> collectively, what is the plural? PACS? PACSs? PACSes?
    >>


  4. Re: Plural of PACS?

    As one of my colleagues put it (thanks Eric St-Pierre):

    My Harrap's "English Grammar for French-speaking people" says that to
    form the pural of a noun, we should add "s". If the word already ends
    with an "s", add "es". Obvisouly, this is incomplete information,
    since there is no mention of acronyms... :-(

    Wikipedia has some more specific explanations about plural of
    acronyms:
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
    English_plural#Plurals_of_symbols_and_initialisms)

    "Acronyms are initialisms
    used as if they are words.
    Clearly, it is not desirable to pluralize the initialism /laser/ as /
    laser's/. Thus the most consistent approach for pluralizing acronyms
    is to simply add a lowercase /-s/ as a suffix. This works well even
    for acronyms ending with an /s/, as with /CASs/ (pronounced "kazzes"),
    while still making it possible to use the possessive form (/-'s/) for
    acronyms without confusion. The traditional style of pluralizing
    single letters with /-'s/ was naturally extended to acronyms when they
    were commonly written with periods. This form is still preferred by
    some people for all initialisms and thus /-'s/ as a suffix is often
    seen in informal usage."

    If you Google, you'll see that this seems to be the trend everywhere.
    See the section about plural of acronyms on these pages:

    http://pcroot.cern.ch/TaligentDocs/T...s/SG/SG_5.html
    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handou..._spelnoun.html
    http://ei.cs.vt.edu/~cs5014/courseNo...Usage.html#4.1


    So... I'm obviously not an English teacher but if I follow the trend,
    I would write:

    "One PACS, two PACSs."


  5. Re: Plural of PACS?

    > "One PACS, two PACSs."

    three PACSen


  6. Re: Plural of PACS?

    Another one of my colleagues cleverly said (thanks Peter!):

    The plural of a few nouns can also be formed from the singular
    by adding -n or -en, stemming from the obsolete Old English
    weak
    declension:

    ox
    oxen

    [...]
    The word box, referring to a computer, is semi-humorously
    pluralized boxen in the Leet dialect. Multiple Vax computers,
    likewise, are sometimes called Vaxen, but multiple Unix
    systems
    are usually Unices (see Irregular plurals of foreign origin
    below).

    Hence PACSen, as a tip of the hat to the Vaxen tradition, with its
    roots
    in either Leet or Old English, take your pick. And since in DICOM the
    required transfer syntax is little-endian because of the VAX heritage
    of
    medical imaging, I would argue that this acknowledgement is entirely
    appropriate.


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