Introducing SMIViewer - A free (soon opensource) DICOM volumeanalyzer for research/study - DICOM

This is a discussion on Introducing SMIViewer - A free (soon opensource) DICOM volumeanalyzer for research/study - DICOM ; Dear Medical Imaging enthusiast, As promised a little over one year ago (at it's inception), Science.Medical.Imaging group is pleased to announce a first ever release of its totally free DICOM image set (volume) analyzer: SMIViewer v1.0.0.1. (SMI stands for Science.Medical.Imaging). ...

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Thread: Introducing SMIViewer - A free (soon opensource) DICOM volumeanalyzer for research/study

  1. Introducing SMIViewer - A free (soon opensource) DICOM volumeanalyzer for research/study

    Dear Medical Imaging enthusiast,

    As promised a little over one year ago (at it's inception),
    Science.Medical.Imaging group is pleased to announce a first ever
    release of its totally free DICOM image set (volume) analyzer:
    SMIViewer v1.0.0.1. (SMI stands for Science.Medical.Imaging).

    Here is a sneak peek of its current capabilities:

    http://medicalimagingscience.googleg...S9niuHrq-IEXAE
    http://medicalimagingscience.googleg...S9niuHrq-IEXAE
    http://medicalimagingscience.googleg...S9niuHrq-IEXAE
    http://medicalimagingscience.googleg...S9niuHrq-IEXAE
    http://medicalimagingscience.googleg...S9niuHrq-IEXAE

    Please note that it is to be used solely for research/academic
    purposes. This software is not a commercial product, and has been
    developed in spare time by the moderator(s) of the
    science.medical.imaging group. The goal is to develop a simple
    platform that would allow researchers to add their custom image
    analysis algorithms
    very quickly.

    This first trial version allows you to load most DICOM 3.0 compliant
    set of primary images (known issues have been noted in the Readme
    document). It lets you browse the loaded image information in 3
    dimensions: with 3 orthogonal MPR views, and a volume rendered views
    (with some limitations).

    It is only Microsoft (R) Windows(TM) platform based for now. And all
    the code is free of any proprietary work, except for the DICOM input/
    output code which is courtesy of dcmtk (Copyright (C) 1994-2005,
    OFFIS).

    If you would be interested in evaluating it for your research/study
    purposes, please write to pixel.to.life@gmail.com and we would be glad
    to provide an absolutely free binary. Please just mention where you
    are from (institution/lab) so we can keep track of its usage.

    Please note that only one person has contributed to this project till
    now, and the second one has volunteered recently (thank you!). And
    therefore the things that you can achieve with it are limited.
    However, we hope to grow this project solely for the benefit of those
    in school or research labs, free of cost.

    As the system becomes stable, we will consider making the code
    opensource too.

    Thanks for your support to another open source effort!


    Prashant Chopra
    [Moderator]
    Science.Medical.Imaging group.

  2. Re: Introducing SMIViewer - A free (soon opensource) DICOM volumeanalyzer for research/study

    I would have no interest in this unless it is open source and not
    restricted
    to non-commercial use.

    David

  3. Re: Introducing SMIViewer - A free (soon opensource) DICOM volumeanalyzer for research/study

    On May 21, 4:32*am, David Clunie wrote:
    > I would have no interest in this unless it is open source and not
    > restricted
    > to non-commercial use.
    >
    > David



    David,

    Appreciate your reply. It will become opensource soon.. as the system
    stabilizes... no other 'commercial' reason:-)

    The restriction on non-commercial use is only because it is in early
    stages still, and doesnt compare to the giant commercial systems you
    can buy. Furthermore, it would be expecting too much to have it
    clinically tested when only one developer works on it in spare time.

    By the way I wonder how useful it will be commercially IF it has not
    been tested clinically? Would you mind throwing some light on this?

    I was really expecting a little more encouraging response from a
    senior member of the community for a project that is totally free for
    the benefit of students/researchers.

    Thanks.

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