Identify this mystery DEC control panel - DEC

This is a discussion on Identify this mystery DEC control panel - DEC ; In alt.sys.pdp8 David Evans wrote: > In article , > Robert Krten wrote: > > > >By CCI do you mean "Consolidated Computer Inc" ? They made terminals, > >where based in Ottawa, and had a PDP-8 clone in the ...

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Thread: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

  1. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    In alt.sys.pdp8 David Evans wrote:
    > In article ,
    > Robert Krten wrote:
    > >
    > >By CCI do you mean "Consolidated Computer Inc" ? They made terminals,
    > >where based in Ottawa, and had a PDP-8 clone in the (mid?) 70's with
    > >a cute little front panel...
    > >


    > Like this?


    > http://plg.uwaterloo.ca/~bfkorvem/di...6/dscf0031.jpg


    Bingo!

    Cheers,
    -RK
    --
    Robert Krten, Antique computer collector looking for PDP-8 and PDP-8/S
    minicomputers; check out their "good home" at www.parse.com/~museum

  2. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    In article ,
    Robert Krten wrote:
    >In alt.sys.pdp8 David Evans wrote:
    >> In article ,
    >> Robert Krten wrote:
    >> >
    >> >By CCI do you mean "Consolidated Computer Inc" ? They made terminals,
    >> >where based in Ottawa, and had a PDP-8 clone in the (mid?) 70's with
    >> >a cute little front panel...
    >> >

    >
    >> Like this?

    >
    >> http://plg.uwaterloo.ca/~bfkorvem/di...6/dscf0031.jpg

    >
    >Bingo!
    >


    Nifty. I've never seen the things in person; I'm sure that Ben will
    now be happy to know what he hauled out of the field.

    --
    David Evans dfevans@bbcr.uwaterloo.ca
    Research Associate http://bbcr.uwaterloo.ca/~dfevans/
    Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge

  3. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    On Apr 5, 9:47 am, "Tom Linden" wrote:
    > On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 11:47:12 -0700, wrote:
    > > On Apr 4, 2:35 pm, info2...@parse.com (Robert Krten) wrote:
    > >> In alt.sys.pdp11 sho...@trailing-edge.com wrote:
    > >> > On Apr 4, 12:35 pm, klu...@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:
    > >> > > In article , kkt
    > >> wrote:
    > >> > > >The original poster might try posting to alt.folklore.computers.
    > >> > > >There's a lot more people reading it and if it's a non-DEC part
    > >> > > >there's a decent chance one of them might have seen it.

    >
    > >> > > Here is a good guess: how about a prototype Sigma clone, made by a
    > >> > > company that was already in the DEC clone business, like CCI or the
    > >> > > like?
    > >> > Was CCI associated with/morphed into Belobox (who I know sold Sigma
    > >> > clones and was also in Irvine) maybe? I recall some connection from
    > >> > the 80's but unlike many other things I have a vague memory of, I
    > >> > cannot say what the connection was.

    >
    > >> By CCI do you mean "Consolidated Computer Inc" ? They made terminals,
    > >> where based in Ottawa, and had a PDP-8 clone in the (mid?) 70's with
    > >> a cute little front panel...

    >
    > > I think I meant "Computer Consoles Incorporated" or maybe "Computer
    > > Consoles Irvine", but you can correct my failing memory if I'm wrong!

    >
    > The former, they were located in Irvine, they acquired the old Varian
    > buildings from Univax(I think) and there may have been a connection to
    > SDS


    Was SDS ever in Irvine? All I know is that the LA-area Sigma diehards
    always pointed at the Xerox building near LAX and said "that used to
    be the SDS building before Xerox bought the company.".

    Tim.


  4. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    On Apr 3, 8:24 am, John DeRosa wrote:
    > On Mon, 02 Apr 2007 11:44:25 -0700, Al Kossow wrote:
    > >http://bitsavers.org/mysteryPanel_Nov74.jpg

    >
    > >This is part of the Computer History Museum collection that no one, including
    > >Gordon Bell, has been able to identify. It appears to be for a 32 bit computer
    > >with a 360-like architecture, but with Unibus control signals. It would appear
    > >to be for a PDP-15 style front panel bezel (two rows of switches) but is using
    > >the PDP-11 color scheme.

    >
    > What's printed on the back of this panel?


    Could this be a front panel for an early version of the AT&T 4ESS
    switch (DEC based before the 3B20) or one of the associated other
    DEC based Bell Labs systems:
    No 1 AMARC was an 11/40 and the 1A was a 11/70.
    I installed an early version of the 4ESS at Bellsouth and
    believe there was an X Bus...could be wrong



  5. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    In article <87wt0r81mv.fsf@k9.prep.synonet.com>,
    Paul Repacholi wrote:
    >Al Kossow writes:
    >
    >> kkt wrote:

    >
    >>> The original poster might try posting to alt.folklore.computers.
    >>> There's a lot more people reading it and if it's a non-DEC part
    >>> there's a decent chance one of them might have seen it.

    >
    >> I am absolutely certain this was made by DEC. It matches the
    >> materials and paints the DEC panel shop used, and will fit into the
    >> cast frame that were used by the PDP-9L, and 15.

    >
    >But the tiny details like the corner radii does not seem quite right.
    >
    >> Why it was made is the mystery.

    >
    >Say that again!
    >
    >> Bob Supnik pointed out that PSW2 doesn't match any known Sigma
    >> implementation. The instruction word and PSW1 do match.

    >
    >> I got mail back from someone familiar with Sigma clones, and he's
    >> never seen a panel like this either.

    >
    >I was interested to see the PDP and EMUL status lights. EMULate what??


    Extended MULtiply, perhaps? Emulate wasn't a common word back then.

    /BAH

  6. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    > The Smithsonian had a blue PDP-15 on display in the Museum of
    > American History, but that's closed for massive renovation now so
    > we can't just drop in and compare. Maybe someone has another shot
    > of a PDP-15?


    Here's a couple shots of the Smithsonian / FBI PDP-15 from my trip to DC a
    couple years ago. Sorry the first one is a bit dark.

    http://eisner.encompasserve.org/~kap...mithsonian.jpg

    http://eisner.encompasserve.org/~kap...nian-panel.jpg

    --
    Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<<
    Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf
    www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org

    Sir, if I was building a weapon of mass destruction,
    you wouldn't be able to find it.

  7. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    On Apr 4, 12:49 pm, Al Kossow wrote:
    > kkt wrote:
    > > The original poster might try posting to alt.folklore.computers.
    > > There's a lot more people reading it and if it's a non-DEC part
    > > there's a decent chance one of them might have seen it.

    >
    > I am absolutely certain this was made by DEC. It matches the materials
    > and paints the DEC panel shop used, and will fit into the cast frame that
    > were used by the PDP-9L, and 15.
    >
    > Why it was made is the mystery.
    >
    > Bob Supnik pointed out that PSW2 doesn't match any known Sigma
    > implementation. The instruction word and PSW1 do match.
    >
    > I got mail back from someone familiar with Sigma clones, and he's
    > never seen a panel like this either.
    >
    > --
    > Posted via a free Usenet account fromhttp://www.teranews.com



    If it was made by DEC as a one-off, it could have been a PDP-16.
    It used to be an exercise at CMU to build a PDP-11 out of PDP-16
    modules
    since the control path could be wired up (literally) to create any
    desired
    instruction set.

    It would have to be emulating 32-bits using double precision, since
    the
    PDP-16 data paths were 16-bit. Also, no floating point hardware.

    --S


  8. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    In article <1176834944.770165.137880@p77g2000hsh.googlegroups. com>,
    smallpond wrote:
    >On Apr 4, 12:49 pm, Al Kossow wrote:
    >> kkt wrote:
    >> > The original poster might try posting to alt.folklore.computers.
    >> > There's a lot more people reading it and if it's a non-DEC part
    >> > there's a decent chance one of them might have seen it.

    >>
    >> I am absolutely certain this was made by DEC. It matches the materials
    >> and paints the DEC panel shop used, and will fit into the cast frame that
    >> were used by the PDP-9L, and 15.
    >>
    >> Why it was made is the mystery.
    >>
    >> Bob Supnik pointed out that PSW2 doesn't match any known Sigma
    >> implementation. The instruction word and PSW1 do match.
    >>
    >> I got mail back from someone familiar with Sigma clones, and he's
    >> never seen a panel like this either.


    >If it was made by DEC as a one-off, it could have been a PDP-16.
    >It used to be an exercise at CMU to build a PDP-11 out of PDP-16
    >modules
    >since the control path could be wired up (literally) to create any
    >desired
    >instruction set.
    >
    >It would have to be emulating 32-bits using double precision, since
    >the
    >PDP-16 data paths were 16-bit. Also, no floating point hardware.


    With the date etched on the panel, I would guess that it
    was made for a special project for one customer. There would
    be no other panels like it. The software would have been
    especially modified for the use. There were quite a few
    projects like this going on back then.

    /BAH

  9. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    smallpond wrote:
    > On Apr 4, 12:49 pm, Al Kossow wrote:
    >> kkt wrote:
    >>> The original poster might try posting to alt.folklore.computers.
    >>> There's a lot more people reading it and if it's a non-DEC part
    >>> there's a decent chance one of them might have seen it.

    >> I am absolutely certain this was made by DEC. It matches the materials
    >> and paints the DEC panel shop used, and will fit into the cast frame that
    >> were used by the PDP-9L, and 15.
    >>
    >> Why it was made is the mystery.
    >>
    >> Bob Supnik pointed out that PSW2 doesn't match any known Sigma
    >> implementation. The instruction word and PSW1 do match.
    >>
    >> I got mail back from someone familiar with Sigma clones, and he's
    >> never seen a panel like this either.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Posted via a free Usenet account fromhttp://www.teranews.com

    >
    >
    > If it was made by DEC as a one-off, it could have been a PDP-16.
    > It used to be an exercise at CMU to build a PDP-11 out of PDP-16
    > modules
    > since the control path could be wired up (literally) to create any
    > desired
    > instruction set.
    >
    > It would have to be emulating 32-bits using double precision, since
    > the
    > PDP-16 data paths were 16-bit. Also, no floating point hardware.
    >
    > --S
    >

    but the PDP-16 was the CADET - Can't Add, Doesn't Even Try.

  10. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    On Thu, 19 Apr 2007, bob wrote:
    > but the PDP-16 was the CADET - Can't Add, Doesn't Even Try.


    Huh? The CADET was the IBM 1620, which had an addition table instead of
    adder hardware.

    -- Mark --

    http://staff.washington.edu/mrc
    Science does not emerge from voting, party politics, or public debate.
    Si vis pacem, para bellum.

  11. Re: Identify this mystery DEC control panel

    bob writes:
    > but the PDP-16 was the CADET - Can't Add, Doesn't Even Try.


    Nope. The PDP-16 adds just fine.

    The IBM 1620 was the CADET.


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