Large Computer Rescue - DEC

This is a discussion on Large Computer Rescue - DEC ; "mensanator@aol.com" writes: > Steve Muccione wrote: > > You need to remove the metal restraining strap surrounding the front before > > trying to implode it. Still... I don't think I'd want to try it. I've seen > > what ...

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Thread: Large Computer Rescue

  1. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    "mensanator@aol.com" writes:

    > Steve Muccione wrote:
    > > You need to remove the metal restraining strap surrounding the front before
    > > trying to implode it. Still... I don't think I'd want to try it. I've seen
    > > what happens to trash dump workers when one goes off that they weren't aware
    > > of (people should really snap the necks before they throw tubes away). One
    > > guy ended up peppered with glass fragments. He was mightly lucky he wasn't
    > > blinded.

    >
    > Utter stupidity aside, my point was that you may very well break
    > all the bones in your hand before you break the screen.


    A few years ago, aome friends of mine took some monitors to the local
    rifle range. A .22 couldn't penetrate the front glass. A .270 did
    that just fine, but with no impressive implosion effects at all; just
    a neat hole.
    --
    Joseph J. Pfeiffer, Jr., Ph.D. Phone -- (505) 646-1605
    Department of Computer Science FAX -- (505) 646-1002
    New Mexico State University http://www.cs.nmsu.edu/~pfeiffer

  2. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    On 16 Jun 2006 07:29:37 -0500
    koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) wrote:

    > Contrary to images popular on TV, the front of the tube is generally
    > stronger than the case in which it's held.


    Indeed - Some time in the early 1980s one manufacturer decided to
    emphasise safety in their advertising, the result I saw at Compec was a
    salesman with a hammer spending most of the day hitting a screen with it
    (and not gently either the screen was down with it's centre about knee
    height and he was raising the hammer to shoulder height and letting his
    arm swing down). The screen was unmarked by this treatment.

    --
    C:>WIN | Directable Mirror Arrays
    The computer obeys and wins. | A better way to focus the sun
    You lose and Bill collects. | licences available see
    | http://www.sohara.org/

  3. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    Punch cards were just a little ahead of my time, but when my Mom was
    taking classes at the Junior College in the early 70's, I would tag
    along to the computer lab. We would bring home mis-punched cards for
    my hamster cage.

    I still remember hearing those hamsters nibbling the cards down since
    they were somewhat thick and made a loud gnawing sound.

    I also remember building huge multi-level card houses with punch cards
    and scotch tape.

    Mike Doyle


    Keys wrote:
    > Great News!!! The Houston Computer Museum has been give two great
    > collections, one in GA and one in KS. We need your help to travel and
    > collect these items, the estimated cost $1400 for GA and $300 for KS. If
    > you can send a small or large donation to help, please send your check to
    > our address below or go to our website www.houstoncomputermuseum.org and our
    > donation page there to use your credit card. If just 1700 people sent us one
    > dollar each, we could add these wonderful items to our collections.
    >
    >
    > Mailing address Houston Computer Museum, 15827 Thistledew Dr., Houston, TX
    > 77082.
    >
    > Some of the items are a SEL 810A computer, ASR33, manuals and many other
    > related items for this machine in KS. In GA we have IBM 083 card sorter,
    > IBM 552 card interpreter, IBM 029 and 129 card punches, IBM patch boards,
    > repair parts for IBM equipment from the 60's, SWTP computer and parts, plus
    > many more items.



  4. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    Bob Koehler wrote:

    > In article , Peter Flass writes:
    >
    >>You didn't actually produce the prepunches. You duped the field from
    >>the previous card ('&', IIRC). You primed the system by punching one
    >>card with the fields to be repeated, and fed that one first. Somewhere
    >>I have a list of codes. As one of my first PC 'C' programs I wrote an
    >>029 keypunch simulator. We had a real whiz secretary/keypuncher who
    >>could turn around programs on a dime with about a 0% error rate, so I
    >>wanted to keep her happy. I still have the program, and was going to
    >>port it to OS/2 VIO, but I haven't gotten a round tuit yet.
    >>

    >
    >
    > On all the 029 I used, you punched a card that then got wrapped
    > around a drun near the top.
    >
    > We had an electronic punch (Univac?) which emulated this by storing
    > that card's data. The problem was most people didn't know about the
    > "drum" card and the thing would come up from power off with random
    > values in that memory. Which was handy, because that meant I was the
    > only one who generally used it (it was free when I needed to punch).
    >

    Well IBM also had a 129 card punch.


  5. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    On 16 Jun 2006 08:45:50 -0700, "syncbus@gmail.com"
    wrote:

    >Punch cards were just a little ahead of my time, but when my Mom was
    >taking classes at the Junior College in the early 70's, I would tag
    >along to the computer lab. We would bring home mis-punched cards for
    >my hamster cage.


    Last night, I pulled a book off the shelf that I hadn't used in a
    while, and found three 80 column cards used as bookmarks, and with
    design notes on the back for a program I'd forgotten I wrote .
    >
    >I still remember hearing those hamsters nibbling the cards down since
    >they were somewhat thick and made a loud gnawing sound.
    >
    >I also remember building huge multi-level card houses with punch cards
    >and scotch tape.
    >


    --
    Al Balmer
    Sun City, AZ

  6. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    On Fri, 16 Jun 2006 10:46:41 GMT, Peter Flass
    wrote:

    >ArarghMail606NOSPAM@NOT.AT.Arargh.com wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 15 Jun 2006 16:40:05 -0400, "Steve Muccione"
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>You need to remove the metal restraining strap surrounding the front before
    >>>trying to implode it. Still... I don't think I'd want to try it. I've seen
    >>>what happens to trash dump workers when one goes off that they weren't aware
    >>>of (people should really snap the necks before they throw tubes away). One

    >>
    >>
    >> Two safe ways of doing that, that I know of:
    >>
    >> 1) Set CRT in a safe place (say the middle of a large empty parking
    >> lot), stand back a good long way, and shoot the neck with a BB or
    >> pellet rifle. (then cleanup the mess)
    >>
    >> 2) Set CRT in bottom of a METAL trash can. Using a long handled
    >> shovel, reach in and tap neck, being sure to duck down out sight of
    >> CRT.
    >>
    >> I have use 2, with no trouble.
    >>

    >
    >But 1 is so much more fun.

    Yes, I think that it would be.

    >BB gun probably wouldn't work.

    A CO2 powered BB rifle should, if you are a good shot.

    >Either a pellet gun, or maybe a 22.

    With those, you really need a backstop of some kind.
    --
    ArarghMail606 at [drop the 'http://www.' from ->] http://www.arargh.com
    BCET Basic Compiler Page: http://www.arargh.com/basic/index.html

    To reply by email, remove the garbage from the reply address.

  7. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    On 2006-06-16 03:45:20 -0700, Peter Flass said:

    > micrologix1500@yahoo.com wrote:
    >> Wow, just when I'm starting to feel old Punch cards! My only taste
    >> of punch cards was when I worked for a bank a dozen-or-so years ago, in
    >> the department that sorted and microfilmed checks. We identified the
    >> batches of checks with pre-punched cards, inserted inline into the
    >> stack. Pretty amazing machines, I've never seen paper move that fast.
    >> They would frequently jam, and the crashes were equally amazing
    >>

    >
    > I've kept a small deck in my desk at work, just to remember.
    >
    > I miss cards; hey were useful for lots of things. People used to throw
    > bunches of chad at weddings instead if rice or confetti - especially
    > great when the little things got down your neck. They made great note
    > paper and bookmarks. My wife read a magazine article about making
    > Christmas wreaths out of them - making a half-twist in them, stapling
    > them together and spray-painting them gold.


    I had a summer job at IBM in Toronto - cleaning the old acoustic
    damping foam from the insides of the punch card printers - this must
    have been in 1968 or 69... - then went on to do inventory control and
    other odd jobs there before going back to high school.

    John :-#)#
    --
    (Please post followups or tech enquires to the newsgroup) John's
    Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9 Call
    (604)872-5757 or Fax 872-2010 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games)
    www.flippers.com "Old pinballers never die, they
    just flip out."


  8. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    "Charlie Gibbs" wrote:

    >In article , jcmorris@mitre.org
    >(Joe Morris) writes:


    [snip]

    >> Autodup copied the data from the preceeding card into the same columns
    >> on the card currently at the punch station. There was an extra-cost
    >> option "aux dup" that allowed the operator to copy data from a card
    >> on a second drum but I never saw an 026 or 029 with this capability.
    >> IIRC you pressed the "aux dup" button on the keyboard; it acted like
    >> the regular "dup" button but read from the second drum rather than the
    >> card at the read station.

    >
    >I never saw a machine with that option either. I wonder how many of
    >these special options ever made it out into the field...


    I thought I saw a two-drum keypunch at the University of British
    Columbia. If so, it was only during a brief period, and it would have
    been only one, maybe two, in a sea of ordinary 029s.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko

    Computerese Irregular Verb Conjugation:
    I have preferences.
    You have biases.
    He/She has prejudices.

  9. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    So, how many people here are for rescuing these computers and how many are
    for blowing them up?


    "Joe Morris" wrote in message
    news:e6u7tr$rh1$1@newslocal.mitre.org...
    > never+mail@panix.com.invalid (Michael Roach) writes:
    >
    >>In article ,
    >>Anne & Lynn Wheeler wrote:
    >>>
    >>>gcard ios3270 was attempt to emulate a lot of the green card with
    >>>online 3270 screens. it doesn't quite have everything ... it doesn't
    >>>have the punch card hole equivalences for bcd and ebcdic

    >
    >>That's because "PUNCH SCREEN" is an unsupported option 8^)

    >
    > ...however many times one wanted to try it out while debugging
    > a particularly irritating program...
    >
    > Joe Morris




  10. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    Thanks for trying to guide this back to the request at hand and to update
    you and others, the donations are now up to over $400 in hand. And I have
    promises of more coming in the form of checks in the mail. :-). Thanks to
    all who have come forward to help with this rescue and I will update
    everyone when the goal is reached and the two trips planned.
    "Neil Phillips" wrote in message
    news:Wa0mg.14848$7e.10457@news-wrt-01.rdc-nyc.rr.com...
    > So, how many people here are for rescuing these computers and how many are
    > for blowing them up?
    >
    >
    > "Joe Morris" wrote in message
    > news:e6u7tr$rh1$1@newslocal.mitre.org...
    >> never+mail@panix.com.invalid (Michael Roach) writes:
    >>
    >>>In article ,
    >>>Anne & Lynn Wheeler wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>gcard ios3270 was attempt to emulate a lot of the green card with
    >>>>online 3270 screens. it doesn't quite have everything ... it doesn't
    >>>>have the punch card hole equivalences for bcd and ebcdic

    >>
    >>>That's because "PUNCH SCREEN" is an unsupported option 8^)

    >>
    >> ...however many times one wanted to try it out while debugging
    >> a particularly irritating program...
    >>
    >> Joe Morris

    >
    >




  11. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    Just wanted to give a special thanks to all that have sent donations to help
    with the rescue and to let you know that a tax receipt will be mailed to
    your return addresses. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit so your donation is tax
    deductible. We still have a ways to go but time is growing short before I
    have to commit to a date for picking up these items. Thanks again John
    "Neil Phillips" wrote in message
    news:Wa0mg.14848$7e.10457@news-wrt-01.rdc-nyc.rr.com...
    > So, how many people here are for rescuing these computers and how many are
    > for blowing them up?
    >
    >
    > "Joe Morris" wrote in message
    > news:e6u7tr$rh1$1@newslocal.mitre.org...
    >> never+mail@panix.com.invalid (Michael Roach) writes:
    >>
    >>>In article ,
    >>>Anne & Lynn Wheeler wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>gcard ios3270 was attempt to emulate a lot of the green card with
    >>>>online 3270 screens. it doesn't quite have everything ... it doesn't
    >>>>have the punch card hole equivalences for bcd and ebcdic

    >>
    >>>That's because "PUNCH SCREEN" is an unsupported option 8^)

    >>
    >> ...however many times one wanted to try it out while debugging
    >> a particularly irritating program...
    >>
    >> Joe Morris

    >
    >




  12. Re: Large Computer Rescue

    C'mon! "into the 90's when a 40mb hard drive was 40,000$" My first kit
    computer was an IBM AT clone that I assembled myself around 1986 or '87. A
    year or two later, I added a Seagate 40GB half-height for somewhere between $300
    and $400, IIRC.

    "into the 90's when a 40mb hard drive was 40,000$" Definitely in the folklore
    category! Ben Myers

    On 15 Jun 2006 10:50:59 -0700, "Isaac W." wrote:

    >I heard about punch cards and 50k hard disks the size of a small car
    >and even into the 90's when a 40mb hard drive was 40,000$ TB storage is
    >becoming more and more common on the High end of the computer storage.
    >Hell I still remeber using a luggable to play games, 64kb memory and
    >bootable 5+1/4 floppies.
    >
    >Now I will get to tell kids about how i used a 486 dx2-66 to go onto
    >the internet when it was mostly "unsoiled"
    >
    >http://fourtymegfourtygrand.ytmnd.com/
    >(fyi other sites from YTMND might be nsfw)
    >
    >Bob Koehler wrote:
    >> In article , "Art M - Artfromny" writes:
    >>
    >> > I wonder if there is anyone else on RGVAC who knows (well, knew) how to
    >> > generate control cards for the 029 to produce prepunches for repetitve
    >> > fields on cards?

    >>
    >> I don't know about RGVAC (whatever that is), but I used to have a
    >> sheet full of the 029 codes. I think I lost it, I still have my
    >> IBM "green card", but I don't see it there.
    >>
    >> (For youngsters, an IBM green card contains a quick reference to
    >> the IBM 360 reference data, including a complete EBCDIC table,
    >> instruction opcodes, instruction formats, assembler directives,
    >> program status word fields, and peripheral access codes).



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