disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA - DEC

This is a discussion on disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA - DEC ; In article , koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes: > In article , kaplow_r@encompasserve.org.TRAB oD (Bob Kaplow) writes: >> >> There's a straight-8 near the PDP-15. I went through the information age >> exhibit last summer. Scary to see stuff there that ...

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  1. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article <+Mjfg+oTcKYR@eisner.encompasserve.org>, koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    > In article , kaplow_r@encompasserve.org.TRABoD (Bob Kaplow) writes:
    >>
    >> There's a straight-8 near the PDP-15. I went through the information age
    >> exhibit last summer. Scary to see stuff there that I'd worked on.

    >
    > Yep. And I had the same thing happen to me when I went through the
    > Air and Space annex out at Dulles. Not just the same model of
    > computer, _the same computer_.


    I was there the same week. What computers were displayed out there?

    One guy in our party admitted that there was an artifact on display that he
    had designed! And they still have an entire airplane of his at Garber,
    waiting for a place to display it.

    Of course the most popular question is why couldn't the founder of Fed Ex
    have donated the $60M so we could spell & pronounce the name of the museum
    :-)

    Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"
    >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<<

    Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf
    www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org

    "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, except
    to encourage attendance in Christian churches; or prohibiting the free
    exercise thereof, except to require prayer in schools; or abridging the
    freedom of speech, except for those questioning the Bush administration; or
    of the press, except that not owned by Rupert Murdoch; or the right of the
    people peaceably to assemble, except those protesting pre-emptive wars; and
    to petition the government for a redress of grievance, except those we don't
    like." -former U.S. Sen. Gary Hart

  2. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    how about Paul Allen? there are rumors going around Albuquerque that he is
    planning a museum of the beginnings of Microsoft here, and they supposedly used
    the Albuquerque Public School's 11/780? or DEC 10 to do work on Microsoft Basic.
    maybe he might be interested.
    John Brockmeyer

    Bob Kaplow wrote:
    > In article <41F6271E.2010706@tsoft-inc.com>, Dave Froble writes:
    >
    >>patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >>
    >>>Jan van Mastbergen wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Stupid question perhaps but have you considered HP?

    >>
    >>Ok, how about Ken Olson?

    >
    >
    > Isn't he in a museum somewhere :-)
    >
    > Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"
    > >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<<
    > Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf
    > www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
    >
    > "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, except
    > to encourage attendance in Christian churches; or prohibiting the free
    > exercise thereof, except to require prayer in schools; or abridging the
    > freedom of speech, except for those questioning the Bush administration; or
    > of the press, except that not owned by Rupert Murdoch; or the right of the
    > people peaceably to assemble, except those protesting pre-emptive wars; and
    > to petition the government for a redress of grievance, except those we don't
    > like." -former U.S. Sen. Gary Hart


  3. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    >
    > Sweet.. Need $ and $.. That would be very nice,
    > have everything from pre-vacuum tube stuff on up.
    > A home for analog computers too, yeah.. I could see
    > it on 100 acres. Mostly indoors of course as geeks
    > don't like the hot weather much..
    >
    > The place could become a location of pilgrimages where
    > acolytes could chant in octal and wizards could perform
    > 5-way merges on relational databases in an afternoon
    > while across the park, boy electricians made huge
    > sparks fly by selecting the right capacitors..
    >
    > Microphones could be placed on the HDA's of grumbling
    > RA81's and during this activity, connected to
    > amplified subwoofers under the spinning platter-shaped
    > floor in the next room - a "hard disk ride"
    > "Ride the RA-81 Platter like a dust speck!!
    > Watch out for the heads!!"
    > Space mountain's got nothing on this one!
    >
    > Rides wouln't be the real attraction though, just a
    > minor diversion. The interactive exhibits of all kinds,
    > that's the key. The real VAXclusters and the 11/780
    > with doors open to show off the cards. A LINUX Beowulf
    > cluster, paper tape, DECtape, 9-track tape, 8-track tape.
    > And the blinkenlights stuff in a room where the lights
    > dim evey several minutes or so. When the lights dim,
    > AM radios tuned to the music of each machine come on,
    > machines programmed to play music via the RFI. I
    > know some remember doing that on pdp8's and other
    > stately machines.
    >
    > On the other stuff, ever programmed an analog computer?


    Oddly enough yes, though it was via patch leads , pots and switchs.
    On the other hand it did simulate a range of problems really nicely...


    > Talk about an experience. There's lots of classic
    > technology pieces out there, tons of test equipment
    > with real CRT's, and machines like plasma generators
    > from depostion processes, ever notice how you can measure
    > plasma density by measuring the attenuation of a
    > microwave beam through the plasma chamber?
    >
    > The progress of everything high tech:
    > computers
    > RF
    > audio
    > Germanium transistors (if anyone recalls those)
    > plain old electricity
    > tesla coil (very very large)
    > open-frame dynamos
    > what else?
    >
    > Might cost what $100M to start?
    >
    > The only geek with enough $ to start something like that,
    > and enough daring to pull it off is Mr. Gates.
    >
    > It's wonderful and would probably make tons of
    > moolah.. Who's going to call Bill?
    >
    > Ok so I was known for wild posts.. but that's the best
    > thing I've heard of yet, a geek theme park. I'd pay to go.
    >
    > It's not going to happen before June though. That's the
    > timeframe we are looking at about now, so I'm back to
    > the subject at hand.
    >
    > Opcom




  4. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Dave Froble wrote:
    > patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >
    >> Jan van Mastbergen wrote:
    >>
    >>> Stupid question perhaps but have you considered HP?

    >
    >
    > Ok, how about Ken Olson?


    Gordon Bell ?
    http://research.microsoft.com/~gbell/

    --
    ME
    Posted by news://news.nb.nu

  5. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article , koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    > And let's not forget the almighty MicroVAX II with it's TK50 drive
    > on permanent display downtown in the Air and Space Museum.


    I missed that. Where is it?

    And I WAS looking for it, cuz when I was there 15 years earlier, it had an
    OUT OF ORDER sign on it. If I ever dig through all my old FILM, I probably
    took a picture of it.

    Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"
    >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<<

    Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf
    www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org

    You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
    reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about
    repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the
    struggle for independence. -- Charles A. Beard

  6. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article , kaplow_r@encompasserve.org.TRABoD (Bob Kaplow) writes:
    > In article , koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    >> And let's not forget the almighty MicroVAX II with it's TK50 drive
    >> on permanent display downtown in the Air and Space Museum.

    >
    > I missed that. Where is it?
    >
    > And I WAS looking for it, cuz when I was there 15 years earlier, it had an
    > OUT OF ORDER sign on it. If I ever dig through all my old FILM, I probably
    > took a picture of it.


    Upstairs, LM (and cafeteria) end, mall side. It's sitting on the
    floor behind a widow in the wall in the entrance to the exhibit on
    aeronautics research. You're in that exhibit if you're looking at
    Howard Hughes' racer, a Cray, the forward-swept wing airplane, or
    parts of other computers.


  7. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA


    It's upstairs in the gallery of computers. as you enter the gallery, it's more
    or less on the left, at floor level, behind glass in the wall.
    been a while since ive seen it, but i probably let out an audible cheer
    when i saw a microvax in there

    isildur


    On Wed, 26 Jan 2005, Bob Kaplow wrote:

    > In article , koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    >> And let's not forget the almighty MicroVAX II with it's TK50 drive
    >> on permanent display downtown in the Air and Space Museum.

    >
    > I missed that. Where is it?
    >
    > And I WAS looking for it, cuz when I was there 15 years earlier, it had an
    > OUT OF ORDER sign on it. If I ever dig through all my old FILM, I probably
    > took a picture of it.
    >
    > Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"
    > >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<<
    > Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf
    > www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
    >
    > You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
    > reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about
    > repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the
    > struggle for independence. -- Charles A. Beard
    >


  8. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    patrick jankowiak wrote:
    > ...
    > Sweet.. Need $ and $.. ...
    > Might cost what $100M to start?
    >
    > The only geek with enough $ to start something like that,
    > and enough daring to pull it off is Mr. Gates.
    >
    > It's wonderful and would probably make tons of
    > moolah.. Who's going to call Bill?


    Please, anyone but him. We don't want these to fall into the hands of
    the enemy.

    --Toby

    > ...
    >
    > Opcom



  9. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Hmmm, I didn't think they *trashed* their stuff...My understanding is
    that it was moved to the west coast and only a subset of the stuff was
    displayed...
    John


    Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    > In article <41f237b0$0$821$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    > Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >
    >>
    >>MoS | Museum of Science, Boston
    >>http://www.tcm.org/
    >>

    >
    >
    > Isn't this the place that trashed all their real computer stuff
    > including stuff that had been donated by people like Dennis
    > Ritchie? I sure didn't see anything vintage computer related
    > on thier website.
    >
    > bill
    >


  10. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA



    Keith Cayemberg wrote:

    > John Smith wrote:
    >
    >> patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >>
    >>> Morten Reistad wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> In article <41F31CAE.6000803@swbell.net>,
    >>>> patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>>>> for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>>>> few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>>>> the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>>>> don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>>>> My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>>>> come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>>>> make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>>>> guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Corporate sponsors are just as shallow. We need to come up
    >>>> with a workable museum first.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> I wish we could do this. There's a hell of a datacenter here just
    >>>>> waiting to be unzipped. It's what we wanted.. (makes me want to
    >>>>> listen to "all we ever wanted" by Bauhaus) Man I am trying to keep
    >>>>> a good mindset but this step is getting me down. It has to be done
    >>>>> though.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> OPCOM
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> A computer museum will need large amounts of space; as well as
    >>>> access to largish amounts of energy when someone decides to run
    >>>> the machines. Much can be mocked up for the standard visitor, using
    >>>> emulators to show software on the correct terminals. But machines
    >>>> must be kept intact. We also have the issue of documentation.
    >>>>
    >>>> Such space fast becomes the major problem. It cannot be in or very
    >>>> near major cities, because land is too expensive there. And the scale
    >>>> of this is big enough for a full theme park.
    >>>>
    >>>> So why not do this?
    >>>>
    >>>> Make a theme park around technology development and preservation.
    >>>> Remember that the audience is a premium one for many locations.
    >>>> The nerds or wannabees that visit such places have above average
    >>>> income, are not very inclined to boozing and gambling, and tend
    >>>> to leave the facilities without damage.
    >>>>
    >>>> It will have to be located somewhere outside the mainstream, and
    >>>> must be the magnet for people itself. Just like Disney World.
    >>>>
    >>>> -- mrr
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Sweet.. Need $ and $.. That would be very nice,
    >>> have everything from pre-vacuum tube stuff on up.
    >>> A home for analog computers too, yeah.. I could see
    >>> it on 100 acres. Mostly indoors of course as geeks
    >>> don't like the hot weather much..
    >>>
    >>> The place could become a location of pilgrimages where
    >>> acolytes could chant in octal and wizards could perform
    >>> 5-way merges on relational databases in an afternoon
    >>> while across the park, boy electricians made huge
    >>> sparks fly by selecting the right capacitors..
    >>>
    >>> Microphones could be placed on the HDA's of grumbling
    >>> RA81's and during this activity, connected to
    >>> amplified subwoofers under the spinning platter-shaped
    >>> floor in the next room - a "hard disk ride"
    >>> "Ride the RA-81 Platter like a dust speck!!
    >>> Watch out for the heads!!"
    >>> Space mountain's got nothing on this one!
    >>>
    >>> Rides wouln't be the real attraction though, just a
    >>> minor diversion. The interactive exhibits of all kinds,
    >>> that's the key. The real VAXclusters and the 11/780
    >>> with doors open to show off the cards. A LINUX Beowulf
    >>> cluster, paper tape, DECtape, 9-track tape, 8-track tape.
    >>> And the blinkenlights stuff in a room where the lights
    >>> dim evey several minutes or so. When the lights dim,
    >>> AM radios tuned to the music of each machine come on,
    >>> machines programmed to play music via the RFI. I
    >>> know some remember doing that on pdp8's and other
    >>> stately machines.
    >>>
    >>> On the other stuff, ever programmed an analog computer?


    Why yes, and designed and built one for my SR EE project-10 amps, each
    with 5 summing junctions (sj's), 10-20turn pots, . Even integrated it
    with a PDP11/10 to do hybrid simulations. The 'classic' problem/demo was
    an automobile suspension system. A few years later, simulated transients
    on a 6-stand rolling mill. Now that was fun. Something about the
    beauty of 2nd order diffeq behavior on an analog computer that is hard
    to capture in bits....

    >>> Talk about an experience. There's lots of classic
    >>> technology pieces out there, tons of test equipment
    >>> with real CRT's, and machines like plasma generators
    >>> from depostion processes, ever notice how you can measure
    >>> plasma density by measuring the attenuation of a
    >>> microwave beam through the plasma chamber?
    >>>
    >>> The progress of everything high tech:
    >>> computers
    >>> RF
    >>> audio
    >>> Germanium transistors (if anyone recalls those)
    >>> plain old electricity
    >>> tesla coil (very very large)
    >>> open-frame dynamos
    >>> what else?
    >>>
    >>> Might cost what $100M to start?
    >>>
    >>> The only geek with enough $ to start something like that,
    >>> and enough daring to pull it off is Mr. Gates.
    >>>
    >>> It's wonderful and would probably make tons of
    >>> moolah.. Who's going to call Bill?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> You'd probably have more luck with Allen, Wozniak, and Ellison. Maybe
    >> even
    >> Ross Perot.
    >>
    >>

    > If I remember correctly, Paul Allen used to (still?) run his own private
    > PDP-10, his favorite system. So he appears to have a history of
    > investing in computer (DEC) history preservation.
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    > K.C.


  11. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In alt.sys.pdp11 John Hudak wrote:
    [unreadable stuff]

    Please read http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html

    Christian

  12. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA


    "patrick jankowiak" wrote in message
    news:41F5AEBE.4010802@swbell.net...

    > We know what hollywood would do to them.


    Hey! Hollywood immortalized a PDP-10 opcode in the movie "TRON" (opcode
    666, the Number of the Beast).

    Carl



  13. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    On 2005-02-01, Carl Appellof wrote:
    > "patrick jankowiak" wrote in message
    > news:41F5AEBE.4010802@swbell.net...
    >> We know what hollywood would do to them.

    > Hey! Hollywood immortalized a PDP-10 opcode in the movie "TRON" (opcode
    > 666, the Number of the Beast).


    Oh? Tell me more.

    ....jay Maynard, the Tron Guy

  14. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    John Hudak top-posts:

    [ moved for the sake of people who know how to read Usenet ]

    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:


    >> In article <41f237b0$0$821$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >> Keith Cayemberg writes:


    >>> MoS | Museum of Science, Boston
    >>> http://www.tcm.org/


    >> Isn't this the place that trashed all their real computer stuff including
    >> stuff that had been donated by people like Dennis Ritchie? I sure didn't
    >> see anything vintage computer related on thier website.


    >> bill


    > Hmmm, I didn't think they *trashed* their stuff...My understanding is that it
    > was moved to the west coast and only a subset of the stuff was displayed...


    Much stuff was destroyed--for example, the Stanford PDP-6 which was given to
    them following the 20 Anniversary celebration at the 1984 DECUS Fall Symposia
    seems to have disappeared completely. The Computer History Museum is the
    result of rescuing as much as possible from their junk heap, and moving on from
    there.

    --
    Rich Alderson | /"\ ASCII ribbon |
    news@alderson.users.panix.com | \ / campaign against |
    "You get what anybody gets. You get a lifetime." | x HTML mail and |
    --Death, of the Endless | / \ postings |

  15. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Rich Alderson wrote:
    >John Hudak top-posts:
    >
    >[ moved for the sake of people who know how to read Usenet ]
    >
    >> Bill Gunshannon wrote:

    >
    >>> In article <41f237b0$0$821$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>> Keith Cayemberg writes:

    >
    >>>> MoS | Museum of Science, Boston
    >>>> http://www.tcm.org/

    >
    >>> Isn't this the place that trashed all their real computer stuff including
    >>> stuff that had been donated by people like Dennis Ritchie? I sure didn't
    >>> see anything vintage computer related on thier website.

    >
    >>> bill

    >
    >> Hmmm, I didn't think they *trashed* their stuff...My understanding is that it
    >> was moved to the west coast and only a subset of the stuff was displayed...

    >
    >Much stuff was destroyed--for example, the Stanford PDP-6 which was given to
    >them following the 20 Anniversary celebration at the 1984 DECUS Fall Symposia
    >seems to have disappeared completely. The Computer History Museum is the
    >result of rescuing as much as possible from their junk heap, and moving on from
    >there.


    When I went to the Boston Computer Museum, a couple years before they closed,
    there was really no DEC stuff on display. There was a LINC-8 there, and
    I think there was a front panel torn off of a Decsystem-10, but there was
    really nothing else.

    In fact, there really weren't -any- interesting old machines there. There
    was an empty Univac I case that clearly had nothing inside, and some fake
    blinky lights on the console. There was a 360/50 with a couple DASD units,
    but the channel controller that went between them was missing and there
    was no reader/punch so it wouldn't have been useful anyway.

    For the most part, none of their displays were complete functioning systems.
    They had a whole rack of 1970s microcomputers all in a case, with no
    information about what made them different from any of the others.

    They did have one of the IMP machines for the early Arpanet, but it was
    behind glass and turned to its side so the front wasn't visible, and there
    was no information at all about what it actually was. This was probably the
    most historically significant piece of gear they had, and it was not even
    on official display as far as I could tell.

    It was really quite shameful. I don't know if they had any additional hardware
    in storage or what, but really I had more interesting historical hardware in
    my machine room at the time I visited in the mid-nineties.
    --scott

    --
    "C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

  16. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    On 1 Feb 2005 14:03:12 -0500, kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote:

    >There was a 360/50 with a couple DASD units,
    >but the channel controller that went between them was missing and there
    >was no reader/punch so it wouldn't have been useful anyway.


    I'm curious - does anyone know what became of that particular item?
    I've been looking for a 360 for some time, and I have, or have a line
    on, the missing items that would make it functional.

    I also have the 360/50 engineering docs :-)

    Mike
    --
    http://www.corestore.org
    "All I know is that I'm being sued for unfair business practices by Microsoft. Hello pot? It's kettle on line two" -
    Michael Robertson

  17. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in
    news:ctojpg$a2b$1@panix2.panix.com:
    > When I went to the Boston Computer Museum, a couple years before they
    > closed, there was really no DEC stuff on display. There was a LINC-8
    > there, and I think there was a front panel torn off of a Decsystem-10,
    > but there was really nothing else.
    >
    > In fact, there really weren't -any- interesting old machines there.
    > There was an empty Univac I case that clearly had nothing inside, and
    > some fake blinky lights on the console. There was a 360/50 with a
    > couple DASD units, but the channel controller that went between them
    > was missing and there was no reader/punch so it wouldn't have been
    > useful anyway.
    >
    > For the most part, none of their displays were complete functioning
    > systems. They had a whole rack of 1970s microcomputers all in a case,
    > with no information about what made them different from any of the
    > others.


    I remember going in the mid to late 80s and thinking the place was pretty
    cool. I remember Illiac, and pieces of vacumm tube computers (think it may
    have been an IBM 70x but not sure), the Stretch computer, a large drum
    memory, with a floppy tacked on the side of it, and a sign saying the
    floppy had more storage capacity than the drum.

    Also they had a DECtalk speech synthesizer with a vt100 hooked up to it,
    and you could type in a sentence and it would try to speak it. Of course,
    I tried to get it to say naughty things to embarass the friends I was with.

    > They did have one of the IMP machines for the early Arpanet, but it
    > was behind glass and turned to its side so the front wasn't visible,
    > and there was no information at all about what it actually was. This
    > was probably the most historically significant piece of gear they had,
    > and it was not even on official display as far as I could tell.


    Sadly, at the time, I would not even have known what the IMPs looked like.
    I had some uucp access, but no Internet access at the time.

    > It was really quite shameful. I don't know if they had any additional
    > hardware in storage or what, but really I had more interesting
    > historical hardware in my machine room at the time I visited in the
    > mid-nineties. --scott


    In its last days it tried to cater to the generation who grew up with PCs
    as opposed to the generation who may have encountered a mainframe or a
    mini. Also they tried to appeal to youth more than adults.

    As for cool museums, IBM used to have one for employees inside its plant at
    Kingston, NY. I remember it had a full 360 console (not a panel, a
    console, with blinkenlights and toggles for all the bits), and it had lots
    of parts from SAGE, the early warning defense computer. They had a SAGE
    console (complete with "light pen"), and some core memory arrays, and some
    vaccum tube racks. Kingston was the assembly plant for the SAGE computers.
    The main assembly hall could hold three SAGE computers in various states of
    assembly, and was being used to hold dozens of 3090 mainframes when I saw
    it. Also they had an IBM Rifle! IBM Kingston was assigned rifle making
    duties during World War II, and thus the IBM Rifle.

    I wondered what happened to all the stuff in that museum. IBM Kingston is
    now closed. I had heard big parts of it were going to be used for the
    State of NY information services, but there was a lot of politics behind
    the move and I'm not sure what ended up happening to the site in general or
    the museum in particular.

    --lw--

  18. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Jay Maynard wrote:
    > On 2005-02-01, Carl Appellof wrote:
    >>>We know what hollywood would do to them.

    >>
    >>Hey! Hollywood immortalized a PDP-10 opcode in the movie "TRON" (opcode
    >>666, the Number of the Beast).

    >
    > Oh? Tell me more.


    Opcodes on the PDP-10 are three octal digits, from 000 to 777.
    One of which is the code to "Test Right-hand half of the accumulator,
    set the tested bits to One, and skip the next instruction if any
    of the tested bits is Nonzero" = TRON AC,BITS

    http://www.inwap.com/pdp10/opcodes.html
    -Joe

  19. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Jay Maynard wrote:
    > On 2005-02-01, Carl Appellof wrote:
    >>>We know what hollywood would do to them.

    >>
    >>Hey! Hollywood immortalized a PDP-10 opcode in the movie "TRON" (opcode
    >>666, the Number of the Beast).

    >
    > Oh? Tell me more.


    And the computer graphics in the TRON movie were calculated on a PDP-10.

    > Newsgroups: alt.folklore.computers
    > Subject: Re: Foonly F-1
    > References:
    > From: jwusenet5@smoe.org (Jeff Wasilko)
    > Message-ID: <1qcm1b-nf4.ln@proxy.smoe.org>
    > Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2003 18:35:49 GMT
    >
    > In article ,
    > GanjaTron wrote:
    >>Greetings, programs!
    >>
    >>Just wondering: whatever happened to the (one and only) Foonly F-1
    >>used by III (Triple I) to produce the CGI in TRON?

    >
    > I worked at triple-I (after the Movie division went elsehwere),
    > and I've got a scan of a couple of documents related to the Foonly and
    > the Tron project:
    >
    > http://www.smoe.org/jeffw/triple-i_history.pdf
    >
    > Some other web sites that might be of interest:
    >
    > http://vhost2.zfx.com/~dave/f1.html
    > http://vhost2.zfx.com/~dave/ddyer.html
    > http://www.accad.ohio-state.edu/~way.../tree/iii.html
    >
    > -jeff


  20. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article ,
    Joe Smith wrote:
    >
    >And the computer graphics in the TRON movie were calculated on a PDP-10.
    >


    Not all of TRON was done by Triple-I. There were two other
    companies; MAGI (I think I spelled that correctly) is the only one
    whose name I recall at the moment. I don't know whether these other
    companies also used PDP-10s.

    --
    David Evans dfevans@bbcr.uwaterloo.ca
    Research Associate, Ph.D. Candidate http://bbcr.uwaterloo.ca/~dfevans/
    University of Waterloo "Default is the value selected by the composer
    Ontario, Canada overridden by your command." - Roland TR-707 Manual

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