disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA - DEC

This is a discussion on disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA - DEC ; On 2005-01-23 04:58, "patrick jankowiak" wrote: > May I ask those interested in this discussion > to make sure to CC or post comments relating > to this thread to the comp.os.vms newsgroup? [fup2 comp.os.vms done] > [...] > > ...

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Thread: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

  1. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    On 2005-01-23 04:58, "patrick jankowiak" wrote:

    > May I ask those interested in this discussion
    > to make sure to CC or post comments relating
    > to this thread to the comp.os.vms newsgroup?


    [fup2 comp.os.vms done]

    > [...]
    >
    > I think comp.os.vms is the most widely
    > available (If I am wrong please correct me,
    > it's been a log time since I have done news).


    "Info-VAX" is still available if you don't have direct access to news
    groups ...

    > [...]


    Michael

    --
    Real names enhance the probability of getting real answers.
    My e-mail account at DECUS Munich is no longer valid.


  2. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article <41F31CAE.6000803@swbell.net>,
    patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >> for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >> few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >> the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >> don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >> My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >> come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >> make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >> guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.


    Corporate sponsors are just as shallow. We need to come up
    with a workable museum first.

    >
    >I wish we could do this. There's a hell of a datacenter here just waiting to be unzipped. It's what we wanted.. (makes me
    >want to listen to "all we ever wanted" by Bauhaus) Man I am trying to keep a good mindset but this step is
    > getting me down. It has to be done though.
    >
    >OPCOM


    A computer museum will need large amounts of space; as well as
    access to largish amounts of energy when someone decides to run
    the machines. Much can be mocked up for the standard visitor, using
    emulators to show software on the correct terminals. But machines
    must be kept intact. We also have the issue of documentation.

    Such space fast becomes the major problem. It cannot be in or very
    near major cities, because land is too expensive there. And the scale
    of this is big enough for a full theme park.

    So why not do this?

    Make a theme park around technology development and preservation.
    Remember that the audience is a premium one for many locations.
    The nerds or wannabees that visit such places have above average
    income, are not very inclined to boozing and gambling, and tend
    to leave the facilities without damage.

    It will have to be located somewhere outside the mainstream, and
    must be the magnet for people itself. Just like Disney World.

    -- mrr



  3. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article <41F31B4C.9030206@swbell.net>,
    patrick jankowiak writes:
    > John Smith wrote:
    >
    >> Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <41f284c5$0$812$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>>Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>>
    >>>>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>In article <41f237b0$0$821$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>>>>Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>MoS | Museum of Science, Boston
    >>>>>>http://www.tcm.org/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Isn't this the place that trashed all their real computer stuff
    >>>>>including stuff that had been donated by people like Dennis
    >>>>>Ritchie? I sure didn't see anything vintage computer related
    >>>>>on thier website.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>bill
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Could be. That is maybe why they are no longer call themselves "The
    >>>>Computer Museum" (TCM). Then it is good that such proposals are
    >>>>discussed in a forum.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks Bill.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The Smithsonian ought to be interested in something like this.
    >>
    >>

    > I just shot them an e-mail.


    I doubt they are interested and I wouldn't trust them with it
    even if they said they were.


    bill

    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    bill@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  4. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    patrick jankowiak writes:

    > %%%%%%%%%%% OPCOM, <21-JAN-2005 22:21:50.00> %%%%%%%%%%%
    > Device DEC$MUSEUM: DFWCUG_HCPS has been dismounted.
    >
    > Normally would not post for sale but this is special.
    >
    > http://www.montagar.com/~patj/hcsale/index.html
    >
    > Serious inquiries only please.
    > Replies to this message will not be received.
    > Contact info is at the URL.


    This should be posted to Alt.folklaw.computers...

    Be nice to recover it to here, but space and shipping cost!!

    --
    Paul Repacholi 1 Crescent Rd.,
    +61 (08) 9257-1001 Kalamunda.
    West Australia 6076
    comp.os.vms,- The Older, Grumpier Slashdot
    Raw, Cooked or Well-done, it's all half baked.
    EPIC, The Architecture of the future, always has been, always will be.

  5. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    patrick jankowiak wrote:
    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >> for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >> few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >> the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >> don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >> My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >> come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >> make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >> guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.
    >>
    >> bill
    >>

    >
    > Bill,
    >
    > I wish we could do this. There's a hell of a datacenter here just
    > waiting to be unzipped. It's what we wanted.. (makes me want to
    > listen to "all we ever wanted" by Bauhaus) Man I am trying to keep a
    > good mindset but this step is getting me down. It has to be done
    > though.



    Maybe there's an unused hanger at Davis Monthan AFB (the "Boneyard") in
    Arizona that the collection can be housed in :-) or Area 51 ;-)

    Or maybe Hollywood would want them to use in a sci-fi movie.....sort of like
    the scene in 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind' where Flight 19's planes
    emerge out of the swirling sandstorm.....



  6. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article <41F3196B.4080708@swbell.net>,
    patrick jankowiak writes:
    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >
    >> In article <41f284c5$0$812$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >> Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>
    >>>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>In article <41f237b0$0$821$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>>> Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>MoS | Museum of Science, Boston
    >>>>>http://www.tcm.org/
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Isn't this the place that trashed all their real computer stuff
    >>>>including stuff that had been donated by people like Dennis
    >>>>Ritchie? I sure didn't see anything vintage computer related
    >>>>on thier website.
    >>>>
    >>>>bill
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Could be. That is maybe why they are no longer call themselves "The
    >>>Computer Museum" (TCM). Then it is good that such proposals are
    >>>discussed in a forum.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks Bill.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >> for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >> few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >> the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >> don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >> My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >> come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >> make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >> guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.
    >>
    >> bill
    >>

    >
    > I have some experience with such entities. Unless permanent space
    > is allocated, items are often eventually disposed of
    > unceremoniously and in an ugly manner. I witnessed this at the
    > "texas broadcast museum". The volunteers were suddenly locked
    > out, and the BOD privately sold off many assets to line their
    > own pockets, and the stuff that was too big to sell was trashed
    > (including the Voice of America broadcasting console and an
    > ancient 5000 watt RCA AM transmitter) and the place now converted
    > to guided tours hands-off, beginning and ending in the gift shop
    > which had been the tech lab where exhibits were serviced.. May
    > the BOD rot for that disgrace.
    >
    > I am not saying that's what would happen, but I am concerned for
    > the future of our historical charges and the legacy they bespeak.
    >


    That can happen no matter where the items go, as should be
    evident given the history of the Boston Computer Museum.
    I am configdent that so long as I could continue to garner
    corportate sponsorship in the form of small (small to any
    real corporation) grants to cover operating expenses like
    payroll for the workers/curators [mostly drawn from the
    ranks of students which would a) keep the cost down,
    b) make the operation even more in-line with the mission
    of the University, and c) provide experience and learning
    to the students that I personally think would be invaluable]
    and acquisition of additional exhibits, keeping space would
    not be a problem.

    bill

    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    bill@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  7. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Stupid question perhaps but have you considered HP?

    Jan van Mastbergen

    "patrick jankowiak" wrote in message
    news:UNkId.22036$iC4.14857@newssvr30.news.prodigy. com...
    > %%%%%%%%%%% OPCOM, <21-JAN-2005 22:21:50.00> %%%%%%%%%%%
    > Device DEC$MUSEUM: DFWCUG_HCPS has been dismounted.
    >
    > Normally would not post for sale but this is special.
    >
    > http://www.montagar.com/~patj/hcsale/index.html
    >
    > Serious inquiries only please.
    > Replies to this message will not be received.
    > Contact info is at the URL.
    >
    > BR,
    > OPCOM





  8. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article ,
    "Jan van Mastbergen" writes:
    > Stupid question perhaps but have you considered HP?


    Sure send it to HP. That's probably the quickest way to get it into
    a landfill. They don't see any value in their current no Windows
    technology. How much value do you think they would place on old
    equipment like VAXen, or PDP's?

    bill

    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    bill@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  9. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Morten Reistad wrote:

    > In article <41F31CAE.6000803@swbell.net>,
    > patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >
    >>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.

    >
    >
    > Corporate sponsors are just as shallow. We need to come up
    > with a workable museum first.
    >
    >
    >>I wish we could do this. There's a hell of a datacenter here just waiting to be unzipped. It's what we wanted.. (makes me
    >>want to listen to "all we ever wanted" by Bauhaus) Man I am trying to keep a good mindset but this step is
    >> getting me down. It has to be done though.
    >>
    >>OPCOM

    >
    >
    > A computer museum will need large amounts of space; as well as
    > access to largish amounts of energy when someone decides to run
    > the machines. Much can be mocked up for the standard visitor, using
    > emulators to show software on the correct terminals. But machines
    > must be kept intact. We also have the issue of documentation.
    >
    > Such space fast becomes the major problem. It cannot be in or very
    > near major cities, because land is too expensive there. And the scale
    > of this is big enough for a full theme park.
    >
    > So why not do this?
    >
    > Make a theme park around technology development and preservation.
    > Remember that the audience is a premium one for many locations.
    > The nerds or wannabees that visit such places have above average
    > income, are not very inclined to boozing and gambling, and tend
    > to leave the facilities without damage.
    >
    > It will have to be located somewhere outside the mainstream, and
    > must be the magnet for people itself. Just like Disney World.
    >
    > -- mrr
    >
    >


    Sweet.. Need $ and $.. That would be very nice,
    have everything from pre-vacuum tube stuff on up.
    A home for analog computers too, yeah.. I could see
    it on 100 acres. Mostly indoors of course as geeks
    don't like the hot weather much..

    The place could become a location of pilgrimages where
    acolytes could chant in octal and wizards could perform
    5-way merges on relational databases in an afternoon
    while across the park, boy electricians made huge
    sparks fly by selecting the right capacitors..

    Microphones could be placed on the HDA's of grumbling
    RA81's and during this activity, connected to
    amplified subwoofers under the spinning platter-shaped
    floor in the next room - a "hard disk ride"
    "Ride the RA-81 Platter like a dust speck!!
    Watch out for the heads!!"
    Space mountain's got nothing on this one!

    Rides wouln't be the real attraction though, just a
    minor diversion. The interactive exhibits of all kinds,
    that's the key. The real VAXclusters and the 11/780
    with doors open to show off the cards. A LINUX Beowulf
    cluster, paper tape, DECtape, 9-track tape, 8-track tape.
    And the blinkenlights stuff in a room where the lights
    dim evey several minutes or so. When the lights dim,
    AM radios tuned to the music of each machine come on,
    machines programmed to play music via the RFI. I
    know some remember doing that on pdp8's and other
    stately machines.

    On the other stuff, ever programmed an analog computer?
    Talk about an experience. There's lots of classic
    technology pieces out there, tons of test equipment
    with real CRT's, and machines like plasma generators
    from depostion processes, ever notice how you can measure
    plasma density by measuring the attenuation of a
    microwave beam through the plasma chamber?

    The progress of everything high tech:
    computers
    RF
    audio
    Germanium transistors (if anyone recalls those)
    plain old electricity
    tesla coil (very very large)
    open-frame dynamos
    what else?

    Might cost what $100M to start?

    The only geek with enough $ to start something like that,
    and enough daring to pull it off is Mr. Gates.

    It's wonderful and would probably make tons of
    moolah.. Who's going to call Bill?

    Ok so I was known for wild posts.. but that's the best
    thing I've heard of yet, a geek theme park. I'd pay to go.

    It's not going to happen before June though. That's the
    timeframe we are looking at about now, so I'm back to
    the subject at hand.

    Opcom

  10. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Bill Gunshannon wrote:

    > In article <41F31B4C.9030206@swbell.net>,
    > patrick jankowiak writes:
    >
    >>John Smith wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>In article <41f284c5$0$812$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>>>Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>In article <41f237b0$0$821$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>>>>>Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>MoS | Museum of Science, Boston
    >>>>>>>http://www.tcm.org/
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Isn't this the place that trashed all their real computer stuff
    >>>>>>including stuff that had been donated by people like Dennis
    >>>>>>Ritchie? I sure didn't see anything vintage computer related
    >>>>>>on thier website.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>bill
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Could be. That is maybe why they are no longer call themselves "The
    >>>>>Computer Museum" (TCM). Then it is good that such proposals are
    >>>>>discussed in a forum.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Thanks Bill.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>>for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>>few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>>the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>>don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>>My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>>come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>>make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>>guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>The Smithsonian ought to be interested in something like this.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>I just shot them an e-mail.

    >
    >
    > I doubt they are interested and I wouldn't trust them with it
    > even if they said they were.
    >
    >
    > bill
    >


    They have not broken down any doors to respond. I am generally
    nervous about museums as I have said. We planned to own the
    eventual property and therefore not be at the whim of
    landlords or evil boards of directors. There were over the
    time period many 'almost condemned' buildings in Dallas.
    Almost condemned simply means "needs this or that or we
    will tear it down" etc.

    There was a nice 10000 sq ft warehouse with leaky roof for
    $60K, with a loading dock and street access to the front
    doors. Problem was the crackheads.. I'd have to be bustin'
    a cap from time to time.. hehe.

    Opcom


  11. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    prep@prep.synonet.com wrote:

    > patrick jankowiak writes:
    >
    >
    >>%%%%%%%%%%% OPCOM, <21-JAN-2005 22:21:50.00> %%%%%%%%%%%
    >>Device DEC$MUSEUM: DFWCUG_HCPS has been dismounted.
    >>
    >>Normally would not post for sale but this is special.
    >>
    >>http://www.montagar.com/~patj/hcsale/index.html
    >>
    >>Serious inquiries only please.
    >>Replies to this message will not be received.
    >>Contact info is at the URL.

    >
    >
    > This should be posted to Alt.folklaw.computers...
    >
    > Be nice to recover it to here, but space and shipping cost!!
    >

    4 or 5 containers? wow, the cost would be quite a bit.
    I can't post there, if someone wants to, please do.

  12. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    John Smith wrote:

    > patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >
    >>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.
    >>>
    >>>bill
    >>>

    >>
    >>Bill,
    >>
    >>I wish we could do this. There's a hell of a datacenter here just
    >> waiting to be unzipped. It's what we wanted.. (makes me want to
    >>listen to "all we ever wanted" by Bauhaus) Man I am trying to keep a
    >>good mindset but this step is getting me down. It has to be done
    >>though.

    >
    >
    >
    > Maybe there's an unused hanger at Davis Monthan AFB (the "Boneyard") in
    > Arizona that the collection can be housed in :-) or Area 51 ;-)
    >
    > Or maybe Hollywood would want them to use in a sci-fi movie.....sort of like
    > the scene in 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind' where Flight 19's planes
    > emerge out of the swirling sandstorm.....
    >
    >

    We know what hollywood would do to them.

  13. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Bill Gunshannon wrote:

    > In article <41F3196B.4080708@swbell.net>,
    > patrick jankowiak writes:
    >
    >>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>In article <41f284c5$0$812$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>> Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>In article <41f237b0$0$821$9b4e6d93@newsread2.arcor-online.net>,
    >>>>> Keith Cayemberg writes:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>MoS | Museum of Science, Boston
    >>>>>>http://www.tcm.org/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Isn't this the place that trashed all their real computer stuff
    >>>>>including stuff that had been donated by people like Dennis
    >>>>>Ritchie? I sure didn't see anything vintage computer related
    >>>>>on thier website.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>bill
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Could be. That is maybe why they are no longer call themselves "The
    >>>>Computer Museum" (TCM). Then it is good that such proposals are
    >>>>discussed in a forum.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks Bill.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.
    >>>
    >>>bill
    >>>

    >>
    >>I have some experience with such entities. Unless permanent space
    >>is allocated, items are often eventually disposed of
    >>unceremoniously and in an ugly manner. I witnessed this at the
    >>"texas broadcast museum". The volunteers were suddenly locked
    >>out, and the BOD privately sold off many assets to line their
    >>own pockets, and the stuff that was too big to sell was trashed
    >>(including the Voice of America broadcasting console and an
    >>ancient 5000 watt RCA AM transmitter) and the place now converted
    >>to guided tours hands-off, beginning and ending in the gift shop
    >>which had been the tech lab where exhibits were serviced.. May
    >>the BOD rot for that disgrace.
    >>
    >>I am not saying that's what would happen, but I am concerned for
    >>the future of our historical charges and the legacy they bespeak.
    >>

    >
    >
    > That can happen no matter where the items go, as should be
    > evident given the history of the Boston Computer Museum.
    > I am configdent that so long as I could continue to garner
    > corportate sponsorship in the form of small (small to any
    > real corporation) grants to cover operating expenses like
    > payroll for the workers/curators [mostly drawn from the
    > ranks of students which would a) keep the cost down,
    > b) make the operation even more in-line with the mission
    > of the University, and c) provide experience and learning
    > to the students that I personally think would be invaluable]
    > and acquisition of additional exhibits, keeping space would
    > not be a problem.
    >
    > bill
    >

    Well, please contact me if you think you can do this. I am open
    to discussion, just send an e-mail to me at the web page with
    contact info, and I can call you, we can always talk about it.

    Opcom

  14. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    Jan van Mastbergen wrote:

    > Stupid question perhaps but have you considered HP?
    >
    > Jan van Mastbergen
    >
    > "patrick jankowiak" wrote in message
    > news:UNkId.22036$iC4.14857@newssvr30.news.prodigy. com...
    >
    >>%%%%%%%%%%% OPCOM, <21-JAN-2005 22:21:50.00> %%%%%%%%%%%
    >>Device DEC$MUSEUM: DFWCUG_HCPS has been dismounted.
    >>
    >>Normally would not post for sale but this is special.
    >>
    >>http://www.montagar.com/~patj/hcsale/index.html
    >>
    >>Serious inquiries only please.
    >>Replies to this message will not be received.
    >>Contact info is at the URL.
    >>
    >>BR,
    >>OPCOM

    >
    >
    >
    >

    I have asked indirectly. So far there does not seem to
    be an interest in DEC equipment. A proper h/p museum
    would certainly include alot of the finest test equipment
    ever made (including a few atomic clocks), and several
    h/p minicomputer systems. I had asked John Wisniewski
    at one time as well, may he rest in peace.

    Opcom

  15. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    patrick jankowiak wrote:
    > Morten Reistad wrote:
    >
    >> In article <41F31CAE.6000803@swbell.net>,
    >> patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>> for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>> few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>> the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>> don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>> My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>> come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>> make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>> guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.

    >>
    >>
    >> Corporate sponsors are just as shallow. We need to come up
    >> with a workable museum first.
    >>
    >>
    >>> I wish we could do this. There's a hell of a datacenter here just
    >>> waiting to be unzipped. It's what we wanted.. (makes me want to
    >>> listen to "all we ever wanted" by Bauhaus) Man I am trying to keep
    >>> a good mindset but this step is getting me down. It has to be done
    >>> though.
    >>>
    >>> OPCOM

    >>
    >>
    >> A computer museum will need large amounts of space; as well as
    >> access to largish amounts of energy when someone decides to run
    >> the machines. Much can be mocked up for the standard visitor, using
    >> emulators to show software on the correct terminals. But machines
    >> must be kept intact. We also have the issue of documentation.
    >>
    >> Such space fast becomes the major problem. It cannot be in or very
    >> near major cities, because land is too expensive there. And the scale
    >> of this is big enough for a full theme park.
    >>
    >> So why not do this?
    >>
    >> Make a theme park around technology development and preservation.
    >> Remember that the audience is a premium one for many locations.
    >> The nerds or wannabees that visit such places have above average
    >> income, are not very inclined to boozing and gambling, and tend
    >> to leave the facilities without damage.
    >>
    >> It will have to be located somewhere outside the mainstream, and
    >> must be the magnet for people itself. Just like Disney World.
    >>
    >> -- mrr
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Sweet.. Need $ and $.. That would be very nice,
    > have everything from pre-vacuum tube stuff on up.
    > A home for analog computers too, yeah.. I could see
    > it on 100 acres. Mostly indoors of course as geeks
    > don't like the hot weather much..
    >
    > The place could become a location of pilgrimages where
    > acolytes could chant in octal and wizards could perform
    > 5-way merges on relational databases in an afternoon
    > while across the park, boy electricians made huge
    > sparks fly by selecting the right capacitors..
    >
    > Microphones could be placed on the HDA's of grumbling
    > RA81's and during this activity, connected to
    > amplified subwoofers under the spinning platter-shaped
    > floor in the next room - a "hard disk ride"
    > "Ride the RA-81 Platter like a dust speck!!
    > Watch out for the heads!!"
    > Space mountain's got nothing on this one!
    >
    > Rides wouln't be the real attraction though, just a
    > minor diversion. The interactive exhibits of all kinds,
    > that's the key. The real VAXclusters and the 11/780
    > with doors open to show off the cards. A LINUX Beowulf
    > cluster, paper tape, DECtape, 9-track tape, 8-track tape.
    > And the blinkenlights stuff in a room where the lights
    > dim evey several minutes or so. When the lights dim,
    > AM radios tuned to the music of each machine come on,
    > machines programmed to play music via the RFI. I
    > know some remember doing that on pdp8's and other
    > stately machines.
    >
    > On the other stuff, ever programmed an analog computer?
    > Talk about an experience. There's lots of classic
    > technology pieces out there, tons of test equipment
    > with real CRT's, and machines like plasma generators
    > from depostion processes, ever notice how you can measure
    > plasma density by measuring the attenuation of a
    > microwave beam through the plasma chamber?
    >
    > The progress of everything high tech:
    > computers
    > RF
    > audio
    > Germanium transistors (if anyone recalls those)
    > plain old electricity
    > tesla coil (very very large)
    > open-frame dynamos
    > what else?
    >
    > Might cost what $100M to start?
    >
    > The only geek with enough $ to start something like that,
    > and enough daring to pull it off is Mr. Gates.
    >
    > It's wonderful and would probably make tons of
    > moolah.. Who's going to call Bill?



    You'd probably have more luck with Allen, Wozniak, and Ellison. Maybe even
    Ross Perot.



  16. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article <41F5AE6D.20208@swbell.net>,
    patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >prep@prep.synonet.com wrote:



    >> This should be posted to Alt.folklaw.computers...
    >>




    >I can't post there, if someone wants to, please do.


    You can post there if you spell it correctly. :-)
    alt.folklore.computers

    /BAH

    Subtract a hundred and four for e-mail.

  17. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    patrick jankowiak wrote:

    > Jan van Mastbergen wrote:
    >
    >> Stupid question perhaps but have you considered HP?


    Ok, how about Ken Olson?


  18. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    John Smith wrote:
    > patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >
    >>Morten Reistad wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>In article <41F31CAE.6000803@swbell.net>,
    >>>patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I have wanted to start a computer museum here at the University
    >>>>>for a long time. I figured if I could get commitments from a
    >>>>>few corporations for operating funds I could probably convince
    >>>>>the University to give me the necessary space. But I really
    >>>>>don't know how to go about finding corporate sponsers. :-(
    >>>>>My idea is to have a real hands on facility where people can
    >>>>>come in and actually play with the equipment. I would also
    >>>>>make as much of it as I could available on the INTERNET with
    >>>>>guest accounts. But, I'm probably just dreaming again.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Corporate sponsors are just as shallow. We need to come up
    >>>with a workable museum first.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I wish we could do this. There's a hell of a datacenter here just
    >>>>waiting to be unzipped. It's what we wanted.. (makes me want to
    >>>> listen to "all we ever wanted" by Bauhaus) Man I am trying to keep
    >>>>a good mindset but this step is getting me down. It has to be done
    >>>>though.
    >>>>
    >>>>OPCOM
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>A computer museum will need large amounts of space; as well as
    >>>access to largish amounts of energy when someone decides to run
    >>>the machines. Much can be mocked up for the standard visitor, using
    >>>emulators to show software on the correct terminals. But machines
    >>>must be kept intact. We also have the issue of documentation.
    >>>
    >>>Such space fast becomes the major problem. It cannot be in or very
    >>>near major cities, because land is too expensive there. And the scale
    >>>of this is big enough for a full theme park.
    >>>
    >>>So why not do this?
    >>>
    >>>Make a theme park around technology development and preservation.
    >>>Remember that the audience is a premium one for many locations.
    >>>The nerds or wannabees that visit such places have above average
    >>>income, are not very inclined to boozing and gambling, and tend
    >>>to leave the facilities without damage.
    >>>
    >>>It will have to be located somewhere outside the mainstream, and
    >>>must be the magnet for people itself. Just like Disney World.
    >>>
    >>>-- mrr
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Sweet.. Need $ and $.. That would be very nice,
    >>have everything from pre-vacuum tube stuff on up.
    >>A home for analog computers too, yeah.. I could see
    >>it on 100 acres. Mostly indoors of course as geeks
    >>don't like the hot weather much..
    >>
    >>The place could become a location of pilgrimages where
    >>acolytes could chant in octal and wizards could perform
    >>5-way merges on relational databases in an afternoon
    >>while across the park, boy electricians made huge
    >>sparks fly by selecting the right capacitors..
    >>
    >>Microphones could be placed on the HDA's of grumbling
    >>RA81's and during this activity, connected to
    >>amplified subwoofers under the spinning platter-shaped
    >>floor in the next room - a "hard disk ride"
    >>"Ride the RA-81 Platter like a dust speck!!
    >>Watch out for the heads!!"
    >>Space mountain's got nothing on this one!
    >>
    >>Rides wouln't be the real attraction though, just a
    >>minor diversion. The interactive exhibits of all kinds,
    >>that's the key. The real VAXclusters and the 11/780
    >>with doors open to show off the cards. A LINUX Beowulf
    >>cluster, paper tape, DECtape, 9-track tape, 8-track tape.
    >>And the blinkenlights stuff in a room where the lights
    >>dim evey several minutes or so. When the lights dim,
    >>AM radios tuned to the music of each machine come on,
    >>machines programmed to play music via the RFI. I
    >>know some remember doing that on pdp8's and other
    >>stately machines.
    >>
    >>On the other stuff, ever programmed an analog computer?
    >>Talk about an experience. There's lots of classic
    >>technology pieces out there, tons of test equipment
    >>with real CRT's, and machines like plasma generators
    >>from depostion processes, ever notice how you can measure
    >>plasma density by measuring the attenuation of a
    >>microwave beam through the plasma chamber?
    >>
    >>The progress of everything high tech:
    >>computers
    >>RF
    >>audio
    >>Germanium transistors (if anyone recalls those)
    >>plain old electricity
    >>tesla coil (very very large)
    >>open-frame dynamos
    >>what else?
    >>
    >>Might cost what $100M to start?
    >>
    >>The only geek with enough $ to start something like that,
    >>and enough daring to pull it off is Mr. Gates.
    >>
    >>It's wonderful and would probably make tons of
    >>moolah.. Who's going to call Bill?

    >
    >
    >
    > You'd probably have more luck with Allen, Wozniak, and Ellison. Maybe even
    > Ross Perot.
    >
    >

    If I remember correctly, Paul Allen used to (still?) run his own private
    PDP-10, his favorite system. So he appears to have a history of
    investing in computer (DEC) history preservation.

    Cheers!

    K.C.

  19. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In all this discussion, has anybody considered giving this to the
    Computer History Museum (www.computerhistory.org) in Mountain View,
    California?

    I visited there in July 2004 while attending training for the systems
    that are planned to replace our Tru64 systems (which were expected
    some years ago to replace our OpenVMS systems ;-P).

    I was very impressed with the collection and the efforts to restore
    stuff.

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  20. Re: disposition of largest private DEC collection in USA

    In article <41F6271E.2010706@tsoft-inc.com>, Dave Froble writes:
    > patrick jankowiak wrote:
    >> Jan van Mastbergen wrote:
    >>> Stupid question perhaps but have you considered HP?

    > Ok, how about Ken Olson?


    Isn't he in a museum somewhere :-)

    Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"
    >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<<

    Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf
    www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org

    "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, except
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