Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine - DEC

This is a discussion on Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine - DEC ; Hello, Recently I finally acquired my friend's DECpc aXP/150, There is an intriguing sticker on it that says: "[d|i|g|i|t|a|l] DEMO000013" Can anyone explain what kind of demo(nstration) that could be? Rambo...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

  1. Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    Hello,

    Recently I finally acquired my friend's DECpc aXP/150,
    There is an intriguing sticker on it that says:

    "[d|i|g|i|t|a|l]
    DEMO000013"

    Can anyone explain what kind of demo(nstration) that could
    be?

    Rambo

  2. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    > The label with the product model and serial number, does the serial number
    > begin with KA. If so, it was made in Kanata, if AY it was made in Ayr,
    > Scotland.


    AY350(something)17(something)...

    Now the question, does anyone have cheap VGA for EISA? Mine seems not
    survived the travel from my friend's home to mine- tends to display
    "bushes" (It's an OAK Tec OAKVISION or something like that, but I was
    thinking about something a little bit more sophisticated).

    About OS it's going to run: Although I have original WinNT/Alpha,
    however I was thinking about something like Digital UNIX, can anyone
    tell me where to obtain it (p2p excluded), and some compiler?

    Thanks in advance,

    Rambo

    PS.: http://do.id.uw.edu.pl/rambo/komputery.html - my little silicon
    farm (and yes, it will increase traffic on my site too) ;-)

  3. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    "Richard Tomkins" writes:

    > Must have been a sales demo unit. Non of the prototypes made it out
    > of my office, in North America.


    Don't have a Gamma kicking around? I will stick it next to the prototype
    RF32 I have.


    --
    Paul Repacholi 1 Crescent Rd.,
    +61 (08) 9257-1001 Kalamunda.
    West Australia 6076
    comp.os.vms,- The Older, Grumpier Slashdot
    Raw, Cooked or Well-done, it's all half baked.
    EPIC, The Architecture of the future, always has been, always will be.

  4. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    I believe the "normal" video board for these systems is
    the Compaq QVision 1024/E, AKA PB2GA-A (yes, Digital bought
    boards from Compaq before the merger). It may show up at
    the console as a CPQ3011 or CPQ3111. The board
    supports one resolution and vertical refresh rate of 1024 x 768 @72Hz
    These should still be floating around the used equipment market.

    --
    B. Z. Lederman Personal Opinions Only

    Posting to a News group does NOT give anyone permission
    to send me advertising by E-mail or put me on a mailing
    list of any kind.

    Please remove the "DISABLE-JUNK-EMAIL" if you have a
    legitimate reason to E-mail a response to this post.


  5. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    Richard Tomkins wrote:
    >
    > The EISA bus was senstive in these machines,
    >
    > You need the Compaq Q-Vision as thta is the only Video Board BIOS that was
    > put in the Jensen firmware and you also need and Adaptec 1740 with special
    > EPROM to boot SCSI.
    >
    > The machine ran Windows NT and might have run OpenVMS, but I cannot remeber
    > ever seeing one do that.


    I had a Jensen running VMS on the job back in the 1995-1997 timeframe.

    --
    David J Dachtera
    dba DJE Systems
    http://www.djesys.com/

    Unofficial OpenVMS Hobbyist Support Page:
    http://www.djesys.com/vms/support/

    Unofficial Affordable OpenVMS Home Page:
    http://www.djesys.com/vms/soho/

  6. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    At one time this platform ran Windows NT (tried this), OpenVMS
    (haven't done it for a while, but it should still work, official
    support will be dropped in the future if it hasn't been already),
    and Tru64 Unix (they dropped support quite a few versions ago).

    There are devices, including video and SCSI, that were 'supported'
    by Windows NT that were not supported by OpenVMS or Tru64. This
    includes at least three SCSI boards. I think there are actually
    two Adaptec boards that will work.

    The QVision board is the safest video board to have. There is
    supposed to be one other that worked in NT, but I've never seen one.

    In theory, there is one version of Linux that was supposed to
    work on this platform, and one guy in Germany says he's gotten
    it to work, but many other people, myself included, were never
    able to get it to work, even following his instructions.

    The frustrating thing for many people is that there are a lot of
    these systems floating around, and they are a real pain to work
    with. I don't think they were ever really a good design. Of
    all the OSes I've tried on it, OpenVMS is the easiest to install
    and actually get working usefully. Windows NT, if you can find
    a distribution kit, will run, but there isn't much software for
    it. The Intel emulator will let you run NT programs compiled for
    Intel platforms, but they will be slow compared to what you can
    get on a ten year newer and faster PC today.

    --
    B. Z. Lederman Personal Opinions Only

    Posting to a News group does NOT give anyone permission
    to send me advertising by E-mail or put me on a mailing
    list of any kind.

    Please remove the "DISABLE-JUNK-EMAIL" if you have a
    legitimate reason to E-mail a response to this post.


  7. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    Richard Tomkins wrote:
    > The EISA bus was senstive in these machines,
    >
    > You need the Compaq Q-Vision as thta is the only Video Board BIOS that was
    > put in the Jensen firmware and you also need and Adaptec 1740 with special
    > EPROM to boot SCSI.
    >
    > The machine ran Windows NT and might have run OpenVMS, but I cannot remeber
    > ever seeing one do that.


    At one time, this was sold as the "Universal Platform" because it can
    run NT, VMS, and UNIX.

    For VMS, you need Adaptec 1742 or 1740 SCSI controllers with the G.2
    ROMs. The 1742 must be the first SCSI controller and has the floppy
    connected. Subsequent SCSI controllers must be 1740s or 1742s with the
    floppy disabled. (All with the G.2 ROMs.) If you have both internal
    and external SCSI devices, it is recommended that the internal and
    external chains be on separate 174x controllers.

    The VMS supported video card is an EISA Compaq Q-Vision 1024x768 card.
    I am told that the 1280x1024 version of this card will also work, but
    only in 1024x768 mode. (You might be able to use two of these cards for
    a multihead system, but I haven't tried that yet.)

    I still use one here for testing software on Alpha VMS 6.1.



    > "Bart Z. Lederman" wrote in
    > message news:ILvbd.803$bW6.48@news.cpqcorp.net...
    >
    >>I believe the "normal" video board for these systems is
    >>the Compaq QVision 1024/E, AKA PB2GA-A (yes, Digital bought
    >>boards from Compaq before the merger). It may show up at
    >>the console as a CPQ3011 or CPQ3111. The board
    >>supports one resolution and vertical refresh rate of 1024 x 768 @72Hz
    >>These should still be floating around the used equipment market.



    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Chris Scheers, Applied Synergy, Inc.

    Voice: 817-237-3360 Internet: chris@applied-synergy.com
    Fax: 817-237-3074

  8. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    lederman@star.enet.dec.DISABLE-JUNK-EMAIL.com (Bart Z. Lederman) wrote in message news:...
    > At one time this platform ran Windows NT (tried this), OpenVMS
    > (haven't done it for a while, but it should still work, official
    > support will be dropped in the future if it hasn't been already),
    > and Tru64 Unix (they dropped support quite a few versions ago).


    I have WinNT Server, which was brought to me with this machine,
    but I'd like something less... Microsoft...

    Is there a way to legally obtain (Open)VMS, or OSF/1, or Tru64?
    Or less legal- like buying one from one of you (I'm in Poland).

    > includes at least three SCSI boards. I think there are actually
    > two Adaptec boards that will work.


    Apparently it's a genuine unchanged DECpc, with original 2.88 floppy
    and caddy-CD-ROM, so I'd think guts in it are supported. Adaptec
    AHA-1740
    board (floppy connected), however, my friend put a 3c905-EISA in it.
    I still have AMD and Hitachi boards it came with.

    > The QVision board is the safest video board to have. There is
    > supposed to be one other that worked in NT, but I've never seen one.


    WTB: QVision board in Europe ;-)

    That OAKVISION could be a derivative of QVision (or it's actually
    retail version of it), because it works pretty fine, sometimes it
    can display bushes, but it's most likely a result of damage of some
    kind.

    > The frustrating thing for many people is that there are a lot of
    > these systems floating around, and they are a real pain to work
    > with. I don't think they were ever really a good design.


    I managed to run (had few problems in deed) Debian on it, however-
    as you probably noticed on my collection: I preffer having
    "original" parts- including OS, and linux of any kind isn't anything.

    Wish you could see it now, cleaning and polishing took at least 7
    years of it! It's THE beauty

    Rambo

  9. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    In article , m_roguski@yahoo.com (Marcin 'Rambo' Roguski) writes:
    >>

    >I have WinNT Server, which was brought to me with this machine,
    >but I'd like something less... Microsoft...
    >
    >Is there a way to legally obtain (Open)VMS, or OSF/1, or Tru64?
    >Or less legal- like buying one from one of you (I'm in Poland).


    If this is for your own personal use, there are Hobbyists programs
    for OpenVMS and Tru64 where you can get a license for free.

    Try http://www.openvmshobbyist.com/ for information on the OpenVMS
    program. You may have to go to the HP Tru64 web page for a pointer
    to their program, and be advised that only an old version will run
    on this platform. I don't think OSF/1 was ever released on this
    platform. There might be a FreeBSD or NetBSD release that will run.
    I personally wouldn't even try Linux on it again unless I really
    had to.

    If you have OpenVMS compatible boards, I'd go with that. You'll
    probably get the best functionality this way, certainly the easiest
    installation and use of what is available. (Other than Windows,
    and if it were my system I wouldn't want that running on it either.)

    If you were a commercial operation, you could go to the HP Home page
    for the appropriate operating system: you can still buy licenses and
    distribution kits, at least for OpenVMS.

    >board (floppy connected), however, my friend put a 3c905-EISA in it.
    >I still have AMD and Hitachi boards it came with.


    You can leave these in, but OpenVMS and Tru64 will ignore anything
    for which it doesn't have a driver. They won't stop the software
    from operating, they just won't be used.

    If you want networking, you will want a DE422 EISA board (aka DEPCA),
    though there might possibly be some ISA boards that will work.

    --
    B. Z. Lederman Personal Opinions Only

    Posting to a News group does NOT give anyone permission
    to send me advertising by E-mail or put me on a mailing
    list of any kind.

    Please remove the "DISABLE-JUNK-EMAIL" if you have a
    legitimate reason to E-mail a response to this post.


  10. Re: Intriguing sticker on my Jensen machine

    David J Dachtera
    enlightened us with:

    > Richard Tomkins wrote:
    >>
    >> The EISA bus was senstive in these machines,
    >>
    >> You need the Compaq Q-Vision as thta is the only
    >> Video Board BIOS that was put in the Jensen firmware


    This machine was available under two names/basic
    configurations, one for VMS/Unix/NT and one that was NT
    only. The NT version can run VMS if you put in all of
    the VMS supported parts (video, SCSI, ethernet, etc)
    [The SOC for the AXP 150 says it supported VMS but I
    don't believe you will find it on the list of supported
    VMS systems %-)]

    The DEC 2000-300 SOC circa 1995 says supported video
    was:

    PB2GA-AA Qvision SVGA+ EISA 8-bit video adapter
    (1024 x 768 resolution)

    The "DECpc AXP 150 Deskside PC" SOC says supported
    video (for NT) was:

    PB2GA-AA Qvision SVGA+ EISA 8-bit video adapter
    (1024 x 768 resolution)

    PB2GA-CA Number Nine GXE high-performance ISA 8-bit
    video adapter (1024 x 768, 1280 x 1024
    resolution)

    PB2GA-EA Matrox MGAI ISA 24-plane video adapter
    (1280 x 1024 resolution)

    (I've got one of these in a box somewhere...)

    >> The machine ran Windows NT and might have run
    >> OpenVMS, butI cannot remeber ever seeing one do
    >> that.


    > I had a Jensen running VMS on the job back in the
    > 1995-1997 timeframe.


    I was running VMS on mine until I replaced it with an
    Alphaserver 400 last Spring ( 2003). I believe the last
    supported version of VMS that will run on it is 7.3
    (as long as it has the correct video, SCSI, etc.)

    back in 1994 there was a Digital Technical Journal
    article that described this machine, comparing it to
    PC's and other things of the same vintage.

    -Andy-

    --
    You can get anything you want, at Alice's Restaurant
    -- Excepting Alice

+ Reply to Thread