How to figure out what machine it came from? - DEC

This is a discussion on How to figure out what machine it came from? - DEC ; Hello there Is there a DEC/Compaq/HP chart or site out there for figuring out what memory goes in what server? I have numerous types of memory, but cannot find a listing of what machines took what memory. I'm guessing there ...

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  1. How to figure out what machine it came from?

    Hello there

    Is there a DEC/Compaq/HP chart or site out there for figuring out what
    memory goes in what server?
    I have numerous types of memory, but cannot find a listing of what
    machines took what memory.
    I'm guessing there must be a list by pin number, speed, EDO, etc...
    somewhere out there.

    I'd like to post here a list of the memory I have, with VERY
    reasonable pricing, so it can be used by someone and not sitting in an
    anti-static bag doing nothing.

    Thanks for any help you might be able to give.

    I had posted one item on ebay, and quickly realized that there are too
    many businesses selling memory for me to be noticed in that arena.

    OldIron

    Here's was my memory as an example:

    CAMINTON 503664-61
    KINGSTON 128MB MEMORY KIT 50366461
    72 Pin - Fast Page SIMMs
    16M x 36 (64MB), Parity - 60ns
    Camintonn Corporation - 503664-61/INT
    Numbers on SIMM board include:
    204180 A
    or 204180A-30T
    1.7" high with Tin-lead contacts
    Each kit consists of 2 sticks of memory, 64MB each.

  2. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    I did something similar maybe a year ago. All I did was list the DEC part
    numbers and a brief description of what I knew about the memory. I sold off
    some memory to DEC hobbyists for cheap and the rest went to a recycler for about
    $5/lb. Unfortunately, DEC always did an extremely poor job of explaining the
    goes-intas, what the part number goes into... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 10:37:06 -0500, OldIron wrote:

    >Hello there
    >
    >Is there a DEC/Compaq/HP chart or site out there for figuring out what
    >memory goes in what server?
    >I have numerous types of memory, but cannot find a listing of what
    >machines took what memory.
    >I'm guessing there must be a list by pin number, speed, EDO, etc...
    >somewhere out there.
    >
    >I'd like to post here a list of the memory I have, with VERY
    >reasonable pricing, so it can be used by someone and not sitting in an
    >anti-static bag doing nothing.
    >
    >Thanks for any help you might be able to give.
    >
    >I had posted one item on ebay, and quickly realized that there are too
    >many businesses selling memory for me to be noticed in that arena.
    >
    >OldIron
    >
    >Here's was my memory as an example:
    >
    >CAMINTON 503664-61
    >KINGSTON 128MB MEMORY KIT 50366461
    >72 Pin - Fast Page SIMMs
    >16M x 36 (64MB), Parity - 60ns
    >Camintonn Corporation - 503664-61/INT
    >Numbers on SIMM board include:
    > 204180 A
    >or 204180A-30T
    >1.7" high with Tin-lead contacts
    >Each kit consists of 2 sticks of memory, 64MB each.


  3. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    Those 64MB 72-pin fast page mode parity SIMMs are cool stuff. They will also
    work in an older Pentium Pro server AND in one of the DEC Prioris XL series
    boxes... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 10:37:06 -0500, OldIron wrote:

    >Hello there
    >
    >Is there a DEC/Compaq/HP chart or site out there for figuring out what
    >memory goes in what server?
    >I have numerous types of memory, but cannot find a listing of what
    >machines took what memory.
    >I'm guessing there must be a list by pin number, speed, EDO, etc...
    >somewhere out there.
    >
    >I'd like to post here a list of the memory I have, with VERY
    >reasonable pricing, so it can be used by someone and not sitting in an
    >anti-static bag doing nothing.
    >
    >Thanks for any help you might be able to give.
    >
    >I had posted one item on ebay, and quickly realized that there are too
    >many businesses selling memory for me to be noticed in that arena.
    >
    >OldIron
    >
    >Here's was my memory as an example:
    >
    >CAMINTON 503664-61
    >KINGSTON 128MB MEMORY KIT 50366461
    >72 Pin - Fast Page SIMMs
    >16M x 36 (64MB), Parity - 60ns
    >Camintonn Corporation - 503664-61/INT
    >Numbers on SIMM board include:
    > 204180 A
    >or 204180A-30T
    >1.7" high with Tin-lead contacts
    >Each kit consists of 2 sticks of memory, 64MB each.


  4. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    Ben Myers schrieb:
    > I did something similar maybe a year ago. All I did was list the DEC part
    > numbers and a brief description of what I knew about the memory. I sold off
    > some memory to DEC hobbyists for cheap


    I remember that transaction. It helped me to fill two of my
    DECstations with RAM to the brim, a 2100 and a 5000-260.
    That was great, since memory for those boxes is almost impossible to find.
    However, some of the sticks for the latter machine turned out to be bad,
    the machine froze under heavy load. It took me some effort to sort out
    those bad chips, but I had plenty of them, so it didn't hurt.


  5. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    On 17 Apr, 17:37, OldIron wrote:
    > Hello there
    >
    > Is there a DEC/Compaq/HP chart or site out there for figuring out what
    > memory goes in what server?
    > I have numerous types of memory, but cannot find a listing of what
    > machines took what memory.
    > I'm guessing there must be a list by pin number, speed, EDO, etc...
    > somewhere out there.
    >
    > I'd like to post here a list of the memory I have, with VERY
    > reasonable pricing, so it can be used by someone and not sitting in an
    > anti-static bag doing nothing.
    >
    > Thanks for any help you might be able to give.
    >
    > I had posted one item on ebay, and quickly realized that there are too
    > many businesses selling memory for me to be noticed in that arena.
    >
    > OldIron
    >
    > Here's was my memory as an example:
    >
    > CAMINTON 503664-61
    > KINGSTON 128MB MEMORY KIT 50366461
    > 72 Pin - Fast Page SIMMs
    > 16M x 36 (64MB), Parity - 60ns
    > Camintonn Corporation - 503664-61/INT
    > Numbers on SIMM board include:
    > 204180 A
    > or 204180A-30T
    > 1.7" high with Tin-lead contacts
    > Each kit consists of 2 sticks of memory, 64MB each.


    I started to produce a DEC SIMMs Field Guide many years ago. This is
    as far as it got: http://www.chrisjdoran.plus.com/simms.html No
    photos, lots of question marks, and no modern stuff, but just in case
    it helps. Additional information welcome to this e-mail address. (Yes,
    I realise there's a "please tell me" but no way to do so on the
    embryonic page.)

    Chris

  6. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2008, Michael Kraemer wrote:

    > I remember that transaction. It helped me to fill two of my
    > DECstations with RAM to the brim, a 2100 and a 5000-260.
    > That was great, since memory for those boxes is almost impossible to find.
    > However, some of the sticks for the latter machine turned out to be bad,
    > the machine froze under heavy load. It took me some effort to sort out
    > those bad chips, but I had plenty of them, so it didn't hurt.


    From my experience with the /260 and alikes: if you put memory modules
    into slots that have never been used, there is almost for sure a layer of
    dirt accumulated on the contacts. I had similar problems with newly-put
    memory appearing bad. I made all the modules I got work eventually, but
    for this to achieve I had to clean contacts in some of the slots up to
    like ten times -- which obviously shows my cleaning skills were not as
    good as I would have thought, but I suppose I might not be the only one.

    I ran the REX memory tests:

    >>t 3/mem *


    as soon I got an ECC error reported by the OS and these tests were good
    enough to isolate problematic modules and hence slots to clean.

    Maciej

  7. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    On Apr 17, 5:30 pm, Ben Myers
    wrote:
    > Those 64MB 72-pin fast page mode parity SIMMs are cool stuff. They will also
    > work in an older Pentium Pro server AND in one of the DEC Prioris XL series
    > boxes... Ben Myers


    Those 64MB SIMMs may also work in the Alphastation 200/400 series;
    they sound an awful lot like what I have in mine (3 banks full,
    384MB). They worked in a number of other EV4-vintage Alpha systems,
    but you had to be careful about the contact types; unfortunately DEC
    didn't just stick with tin; the PC64 Cabriolet motherboard I had for a
    while wanted gold contact SIMMs but with the rest of the specs the
    same.

    The AS600 I have in storage uses 16MB 4x36 fast page mode, 60ns, tin
    contact SIMMs in larger banks (8 I think?). I never had enough
    exactly matching 64MB SIMMs to see if they would work, but I did bring
    the AS600 up to 256MB using the 16MB units.

  8. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    Maciej W. Rozycki schrieb:
    > On Fri, 18 Apr 2008, Michael Kraemer wrote:
    >


    >
    > From my experience with the /260 and alikes: if you put memory modules
    > into slots that have never been used, there is almost for sure a layer of
    > dirt accumulated on the contacts. I had similar problems with newly-put
    > memory appearing bad. I made all the modules I got work eventually, but
    > for this to achieve I had to clean contacts in some of the slots up to
    > like ten times -- which obviously shows my cleaning skills were not as
    > good as I would have thought, but I suppose I might not be the only one.
    >
    > I ran the REX memory tests:
    >
    >
    >>>t 3/mem *

    >
    >
    > as soon I got an ECC error reported by the OS and these tests were good
    > enough to isolate problematic modules and hence slots to clean.
    >


    OK, I'll give it a try whenever I get a second /260 :-)
    However, the problems I encountered were somewhat strange.
    Console recognized the RAM w/o problems, but this doesn't mean much.
    Ultrix accepted it as well, at least at boot time,
    but as I added more and more memory consuming tasks.
    the system suddenly froze, i.e. no real crash, just freezing.
    Exchanging the last added RAM part and rebooting the machine
    turned out to be a work-around.


  9. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    On Sat, 19 Apr 2008, Michael Kraemer wrote:

    > However, the problems I encountered were somewhat strange.
    > Console recognized the RAM w/o problems, but this doesn't mean much.
    > Ultrix accepted it as well, at least at boot time,


    Neither perform extensive memory tests, even the console unless
    specifically requested as noted.

    > but as I added more and more memory consuming tasks.
    > the system suddenly froze, i.e. no real crash, just freezing.


    Well, if some critical memory area is seriously corrupted, which will
    happen if an address or data line is stuck or drives a random signal
    because of a bad contact, then you may see nothing. Multi-bit (>=3)
    errors are not guaranteed to be signalled at all. Even with a non-serious
    corruption you may not be able to recover if the ECC error handler itself
    is corrupted.

    > Exchanging the last added RAM part and rebooting the machine
    > turned out to be a work-around.


    You could have wiped dirt away as a side effect of swapping the modules
    or the contacts in the good module might have been a little bit tighter.
    Of course the other one might have been genuinely bad -- it happens from
    time to time too.

    Maciej

  10. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    Maciej W. Rozycki schrieb:
    > On Sat, 19 Apr 2008, Michael Kraemer wrote:
    >
    >
    >>However, the problems I encountered were somewhat strange.
    >>Console recognized the RAM w/o problems, but this doesn't mean much.
    >>Ultrix accepted it as well, at least at boot time,

    >
    >
    > Neither perform extensive memory tests, even the console unless
    > specifically requested as noted.


    Well, on both, VAX- and DECstations,
    I experienced more than once the confusing behaviour
    that the console and Ultrix have quite different opinions as to
    how acceptable a piece of memory is.
    It doesn't mean that a particular RAM is really bad.
    E.g. if you put mixed 8/32MB parts into a DECstation,
    the console happily indicates all of them,
    whereas Ultrix will recognize only some of them.

    > You could have wiped dirt away as a side effect of swapping the modules
    > or the contacts in the good module might have been a little bit tighter.
    > Of course the other one might have been genuinely bad -- it happens from
    > time to time too.


    The box as well as the memory appeared to be quite clean,
    and I had the impression that it really were some bad RAM pieces.
    I'll give it another try with my next /260 :-)


  11. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2008, Michael Kraemer wrote:

    > E.g. if you put mixed 8/32MB parts into a DECstation,
    > the console happily indicates all of them,
    > whereas Ultrix will recognize only some of them.


    The memory controller on all the DECstation 5000/2x0 systems supports
    mixed memory configurations and the REX console will happily support them
    as long as there is a module in the slot #0 and it is of the bigger kind.
    In such a case in all the slots containing 8MB modules the memory provided
    will be replicated four times accross the slot's address space as all the
    memory controller can do is to globally select between slot-selects on
    32MB and 8MB boundaries and if an 8MB module is decoded with the 32MB
    stride the module simply does not decode the upper two bits of the offset
    within its slot.

    Similarly NVRAM modules are supported by circuitry of all slots in the
    /200 and the slot #15 only in the /240 and /260 with the console acting
    accordingly.

    Now it is up to the operating system whether a given memory configuration
    is supported or not. Ultrix I am told can only support contiguous memory
    configurations, but otherwise does not really care what the configuration
    looks like. Therefore it can support up to one 8MB module immediately
    following a contiguous set of 32MB ones. Linux on the other hand supports
    arbitrary configurations as I am told NetBSD does. I have no idea about
    OSF/1, nor anything else that could have possibly been ported to these
    systems.

    Maciej

  12. Re: How to figure out what machine it came from?

    Thanks for all the input.
    I think I'll photo them, find all the data I can, and post a website
    to sell them as they are wanted.
    Perhaps some can use them, I sure don't want to toss them all.
    Lots of EDO stuff too...
    OldIron

    On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 18:30:27 -0400, Ben Myers
    wrote:

    >Those 64MB 72-pin fast page mode parity SIMMs are cool stuff. They will also
    >work in an older Pentium Pro server AND in one of the DEC Prioris XL series
    >boxes... Ben Myers
    >
    >On Thu, 17 Apr 2008 10:37:06 -0500, OldIron wrote:
    >
    >>Hello there
    >>
    >>Is there a DEC/Compaq/HP chart or site out there for figuring out what
    >>memory goes in what server?
    >>I have numerous types of memory, but cannot find a listing of what
    >>machines took what memory.
    >>I'm guessing there must be a list by pin number, speed, EDO, etc...
    >>somewhere out there.
    >>
    >>I'd like to post here a list of the memory I have, with VERY
    >>reasonable pricing, so it can be used by someone and not sitting in an
    >>anti-static bag doing nothing.
    >>
    >>Thanks for any help you might be able to give.
    >>
    >>I had posted one item on ebay, and quickly realized that there are too
    >>many businesses selling memory for me to be noticed in that arena.
    >>
    >>OldIron
    >>
    >>Here's was my memory as an example:
    >>
    >>CAMINTON 503664-61
    >>KINGSTON 128MB MEMORY KIT 50366461
    >>72 Pin - Fast Page SIMMs
    >>16M x 36 (64MB), Parity - 60ns
    >>Camintonn Corporation - 503664-61/INT
    >>Numbers on SIMM board include:
    >> 204180 A
    >>or 204180A-30T
    >>1.7" high with Tin-lead contacts
    >>Each kit consists of 2 sticks of memory, 64MB each.


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