Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian - Debian

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Thread: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

  1. Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    day and I install all of them!)

    I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    reclaim that space.

    I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    windows box for those purposes.

    What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    installation.

    --
    LTP



  2. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    While hanging out in alt.os.linux.debian, I heard Luc The Perverse say:

    > Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    > day and I install all of them!)
    >
    > I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    > wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    > know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    > - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    > using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    > down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    > reclaim that space.
    >
    > I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    > I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    > had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    > around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    > but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    > windows box for those purposes.
    >
    > What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    > anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    > installation.
    >
    > --
    > LTP
    >
    >


    You could try the Gparted live CD. It has always worked well for me.
    http://gparted.sourceforge.net/index.php
    --
    There are only 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary,
    and those who don't.

  3. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    On Oct 18, 10:11 pm, Luc The Perverse
    wrote:
    > Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    > day and I install all of them!)
    >
    > I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    > wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    > know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    > - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    > using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    > down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    > reclaim that space.
    >
    > I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    > I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    > had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    > around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    > but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    > windows box for those purposes.
    >
    > What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    > anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    > installation.
    >
    > --
    > LTP
    >
    >


    Identify which partition you have it on /dev/hda1 or something like
    that. If you do this wrong you could clean your / partiton (or any
    other) clean.
    Open a terminal window and try type 'sudo fdisk -list /dev/hda' to see
    what partitions there are on first IDE harddrive. You will get
    something like this.

    /dev/hda1 * 1 3824 30716248+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/hda2 3825 3836 96390 83 Linux

    Here /dev/hda1 is the NTFS partition. To make this a ext3 partition
    just try this
    'sudo mkfs /dev/hda1'
    And you will have a good new partition.

    Add this line into /etc/fstab and you can easily mount it as a user.
    '/dev/hda1 /mnt/hda1 ext3 defaults,users
    0 2'

    Then create the mounting point where you will find the files on that
    disk
    'sudo mkdir /mnt/hda1'


  4. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    AJackson wrote:
    > On Oct 18, 10:11 pm, Luc The Perverse
    > wrote:
    >> Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    >> day and I install all of them!)
    >>
    >> I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    >> wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    >> know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    >> - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    >> using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    >> down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    >> reclaim that space.
    >>
    >> I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    >> I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    >> had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    >> around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    >> but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    >> windows box for those purposes.
    >>
    >> What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    >> anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    >> installation.
    >>
    >> --
    >> LTP
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Identify which partition you have it on /dev/hda1 or something like
    > that. If you do this wrong you could clean your / partiton (or any
    > other) clean.
    > Open a terminal window and try type 'sudo fdisk -list /dev/hda' to see
    > what partitions there are on first IDE harddrive. You will get
    > something like this.
    >
    > /dev/hda1 * 1 3824 30716248+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
    > /dev/hda2 3825 3836 96390 83 Linux
    >
    > Here /dev/hda1 is the NTFS partition. To make this a ext3 partition
    > just try this
    > 'sudo mkfs /dev/hda1'
    > And you will have a good new partition.
    >
    > Add this line into /etc/fstab and you can easily mount it as a user.
    > '/dev/hda1 /mnt/hda1 ext3 defaults,users
    > 0 2'
    >
    > Then create the mounting point where you will find the files on that
    > disk
    > 'sudo mkdir /mnt/hda1'
    >



    Cool - thank you

    --
    LTP



  5. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 13:11:07 -0700, Luc The Perverse wrote:

    > Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    > day and I install all of them!)
    >
    > I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    > wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    > know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    > - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    > using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    > down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    > reclaim that space.
    >
    > I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    > I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    > had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    > around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    > but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    > windows box for those purposes.
    >
    > What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    > anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    > installation.


    gparted. There is a gparted Live CD.


  6. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    On Oct 21, 6:46 pm, Luc The Perverse
    wrote:
    > AJackson wrote:
    > > On Oct 18, 10:11 pm, Luc The Perverse
    > > wrote:
    > >> Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    > >> day and I install all of them!)

    >
    > >> I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    > >> wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    > >> know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    > >> - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    > >> using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    > >> down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    > >> reclaim that space.

    >
    > >> I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    > >> I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    > >> had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    > >> around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    > >> but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    > >> windows box for those purposes.

    >
    > >> What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    > >> anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    > >> installation.

    >
    > >> --
    > >> LTP

    >
    > >>

    >
    > > Identify which partition you have it on /dev/hda1 or something like
    > > that. If you do this wrong you could clean your / partiton (or any
    > > other) clean.
    > > Open a terminal window and try type 'sudo fdisk -list /dev/hda' to see
    > > what partitions there are on first IDE harddrive. You will get
    > > something like this.

    >
    > > /dev/hda1 * 1 3824 30716248+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
    > > /dev/hda2 3825 3836 96390 83 Linux

    >
    > > Here /dev/hda1 is the NTFS partition. To make this a ext3 partition
    > > just try this
    > > 'sudo mkfs /dev/hda1'
    > > And you will have a good new partition.


    But first you need to make partition type from "HPFS/NTFS" (code 7)
    into "Linux" (code 83).
    You can do that with cfdisk, fdisk, parted or gparted.

    Sorry that I forgot that part.

    > > Add this line into /etc/fstab and you can easily mount it as a user.
    > > '/dev/hda1 /mnt/hda1 ext3 defaults,users 0 2'

    >
    > > Then create the mounting point where you will find the files on that
    > > disk
    > > 'sudo mkdir /mnt/hda1'


    And then as any user try 'mount /dev/hda1' and 'umount /dev/hda1'

    And always read the manual pages and check what people writes.

    So, did you success in your quest?


  7. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    On Oct 21, 11:57 pm, ray wrote:
    > On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 13:11:07 -0700, Luc The Perverse wrote:
    > > Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    > > day and I install all of them!)

    >
    > > I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    > > wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    > > know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    > > - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    > > using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    > > down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    > > reclaim that space.

    >
    > > I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    > > I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    > > had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    > > around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    > > but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    > > windows box for those purposes.

    >
    > > What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    > > anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    > > installation.

    >
    > gparted. There is a gparted Live CD.


    If the partition that you are going to change is not used, there is no
    need to use a live CD.

    IF you are going to change a partition that is in use and can't boot
    in singel user and unmount that partition, like your root partition
    (/), then you must boot another OS to do that. A live CD is a very
    good method to do this.

    With a lvm, you don't need to do that. You can change partitions under
    the feet of the OS, and make a partiotion larger (or smaller) on a
    running system, with the right choise of file systems (like ext3fs,
    reiserfs, xfs etc).

    Good luck


  8. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    AJackson wrote:
    > On Oct 21, 6:46 pm, Luc The Perverse
    > wrote:
    >> AJackson wrote:
    >>> On Oct 18, 10:11 pm, Luc The Perverse
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    >>>> day and I install all of them!)
    >>>> I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    >>>> wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    >>>> know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    >>>> - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    >>>> using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    >>>> down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    >>>> reclaim that space.
    >>>> I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    >>>> I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    >>>> had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    >>>> around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    >>>> but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    >>>> windows box for those purposes.
    >>>> What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    >>>> anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    >>>> installation.
    >>>> --
    >>>> LTP
    >>>>
    >>> Identify which partition you have it on /dev/hda1 or something like
    >>> that. If you do this wrong you could clean your / partiton (or any
    >>> other) clean.
    >>> Open a terminal window and try type 'sudo fdisk -list /dev/hda' to see
    >>> what partitions there are on first IDE harddrive. You will get
    >>> something like this.
    >>> /dev/hda1 * 1 3824 30716248+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
    >>> /dev/hda2 3825 3836 96390 83 Linux
    >>> Here /dev/hda1 is the NTFS partition. To make this a ext3 partition
    >>> just try this
    >>> 'sudo mkfs /dev/hda1'
    >>> And you will have a good new partition.

    >
    > But first you need to make partition type from "HPFS/NTFS" (code 7)
    > into "Linux" (code 83).
    > You can do that with cfdisk, fdisk, parted or gparted.
    >
    > Sorry that I forgot that part.
    >
    >>> Add this line into /etc/fstab and you can easily mount it as a user.
    >>> '/dev/hda1 /mnt/hda1 ext3 defaults,users 0 2'
    >>> Then create the mounting point where you will find the files on that
    >>> disk
    >>> 'sudo mkdir /mnt/hda1'

    >
    > And then as any user try 'mount /dev/hda1' and 'umount /dev/hda1'
    >
    > And always read the manual pages and check what people writes.
    >
    > So, did you success in your quest?
    >



    yeah I did thanks

    Now I just have an annoying Gnome issue where if I mount the drive it
    appears on my desktop - but that is fairly minor - and I'm sure I can
    fix it when I spend a few minutes on it.


    Thanks everyone

    --
    LTP



  9. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    On Oct 25, 3:51 am, Luc The Perverse
    wrote:
    > AJackson wrote:
    > > On Oct 21, 6:46 pm, Luc The Perverse
    > > wrote:
    > >> AJackson wrote:
    > >>> On Oct 18, 10:11 pm, Luc The Perverse
    > >>> wrote:
    > >>>> Hello! I have the latest unstable version of Debian (updates come every
    > >>>> day and I install all of them!)
    > >>>> I have a stray NTFS partition on my drive and I would like to securely
    > >>>> wipe it and then reclaim the space as a new Ext3 partition. I don't
    > >>>> know the size of it - but is comparatively small like 60 GB or something
    > >>>> - just the files I couldn't fit on my spare 120 GB drive that I was
    > >>>> using for backup purposes. I'm starting to feel the crunch though - I'm
    > >>>> down to 107 GB free on my main partition so I would definitely like to
    > >>>> reclaim that space.
    > >>>> I had forgotten about it - as I used it as a temporary storing ground so
    > >>>> I wouldn't lose any files as I wiped all my other system partitions. I
    > >>>> had since gotten the data off and no longer need it. I was keeping it
    > >>>> around in case I needed Windows for a programming or gaming project -
    > >>>> but the chance of that has dropped to 0 now that I have a shiny new
    > >>>> windows box for those purposes.
    > >>>> What tool would you suggest? I have never worked with partitions or
    > >>>> anything of the like in Linux except in the highly guided debian
    > >>>> installation.
    > >>>> --
    > >>>> LTP
    > >>>>
    > >>> Identify which partition you have it on /dev/hda1 or something like
    > >>> that. If you do this wrong you could clean your / partiton (or any
    > >>> other) clean.
    > >>> Open a terminal window and try type 'sudo fdisk -list /dev/hda' to see
    > >>> what partitions there are on first IDE harddrive. You will get
    > >>> something like this.
    > >>> /dev/hda1 * 1 3824 30716248+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
    > >>> /dev/hda2 3825 3836 96390 83 Linux
    > >>> Here /dev/hda1 is the NTFS partition. To make this a ext3 partition
    > >>> just try this
    > >>> 'sudo mkfs /dev/hda1'
    > >>> And you will have a good new partition.

    >
    > > But first you need to make partition type from "HPFS/NTFS" (code 7)
    > > into "Linux" (code 83).
    > > You can do that with cfdisk, fdisk, parted or gparted.

    >
    > > Sorry that I forgot that part.

    >
    > >>> Add this line into /etc/fstab and you can easily mount it as a user.
    > >>> '/dev/hda1 /mnt/hda1 ext3 defaults,users 0 2'
    > >>> Then create the mounting point where you will find the files on that
    > >>> disk
    > >>> 'sudo mkdir /mnt/hda1'

    >
    > > And then as any user try 'mount /dev/hda1' and 'umount /dev/hda1'

    >
    > > And always read the manual pages and check what people writes.

    >
    > > So, did you success in your quest?

    >
    > yeah I did thanks


    (You should tell us then how you did ;-))

    > Now I just have an annoying Gnome issue where if I mount the drive it
    > appears on my desktop - but that is fairly minor - and I'm sure I can
    > fix it when I spend a few minutes on it.


    Remove user from the line in /etc/fstab. Then that partition will
    mount automaticly when you boot. And Gnome shouldn't put the disk on
    your desktop. Only disks that you are allowed to mount as an ordinary
    user (marked with 'user' or 'users' in option collumn in /etc/fstab).
    Have a look at 'man fstab'.

    Good luck


  10. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    AJackson wrote:
    >> Now I just have an annoying Gnome issue where if I mount the drive it
    >> appears on my desktop - but that is fairly minor - and I'm sure I can
    >> fix it when I spend a few minutes on it.

    >
    > Remove user from the line in /etc/fstab. Then that partition will
    > mount automaticly when you boot. And Gnome shouldn't put the disk on
    > your desktop. Only disks that you are allowed to mount as an ordinary
    > user (marked with 'user' or 'users' in option collumn in /etc/fstab).
    > Have a look at 'man fstab'.
    >

    I have three partitions mounted at boot time, all three show up on the
    desktop. (gnome 2.18.3, debian testing)

    --
    Keith Blow

  11. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    Keith Blow wrote:
    > AJackson wrote:
    >>> Now I just have an annoying Gnome issue where if I mount the drive it
    >>> appears on my desktop - but that is fairly minor - and I'm sure I can
    >>> fix it when I spend a few minutes on it.

    >> Remove user from the line in /etc/fstab. Then that partition will
    >> mount automaticly when you boot. And Gnome shouldn't put the disk on
    >> your desktop. Only disks that you are allowed to mount as an ordinary
    >> user (marked with 'user' or 'users' in option collumn in /etc/fstab).
    >> Have a look at 'man fstab'.
    >>

    > I have three partitions mounted at boot time, all three show up on the
    > desktop. (gnome 2.18.3, debian testing)


    Well my other partitions do not appear on the desktop - the ones I
    installed - and if they did I would find a way to remove them because I
    like "NOTHING" on my desktop unless I am actively working on it.

    --
    LTP




  12. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    Luc The Perverse wrote:
    > Keith Blow wrote:
    >> AJackson wrote:
    >>>> Now I just have an annoying Gnome issue where if I mount the drive it
    >>>> appears on my desktop - but that is fairly minor - and I'm sure I can
    >>>> fix it when I spend a few minutes on it.
    >>> Remove user from the line in /etc/fstab. Then that partition will
    >>> mount automaticly when you boot. And Gnome shouldn't put the disk on
    >>> your desktop. Only disks that you are allowed to mount as an ordinary
    >>> user (marked with 'user' or 'users' in option collumn in /etc/fstab).
    >>> Have a look at 'man fstab'.
    >>>

    >> I have three partitions mounted at boot time, all three show up on the
    >> desktop. (gnome 2.18.3, debian testing)

    >
    > Well my other partitions do not appear on the desktop - the ones I
    > installed - and if they did I would find a way to remove them because I
    > like "NOTHING" on my desktop unless I am actively working on it.
    >
    > --
    > LTP
    >
    >
    >

    Agreed, in fact I'm more extreme, I don't use the desktop at all.
    Documents I'm working on can easily be found in the "recent documents"
    section of all the apps I'm using.
    The point I was making was that I have a setup which the previous poster
    said would ensure the drives don't appear on the Desktop, but they do.
    If you find out how to avoid this, please post the solution.

    --
    Keith Blow

  13. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    Keith Blow wrote:
    > Luc The Perverse wrote:
    >> Keith Blow wrote:


    >>> I have three partitions mounted at boot time, all three show up on the
    >>> desktop. (gnome 2.18.3, debian testing)

    >> Well my other partitions do not appear on the desktop - the ones I
    >> installed - and if they did I would find a way to remove them because I
    >> like "NOTHING" on my desktop unless I am actively working on it.
    >>
    >> --
    >> LTP
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Agreed, in fact I'm more extreme, I don't use the desktop at all.
    > Documents I'm working on can easily be found in the "recent documents"
    > section of all the apps I'm using.
    > The point I was making was that I have a setup which the previous poster
    > said would ensure the drives don't appear on the Desktop, but they do.
    > If you find out how to avoid this, please post the solution.
    >


    I would start in such a case to experiment with different mount points.
    Where did you mount those drives? I'm just guessing but I can imagine
    that /mnt/* and /media/* are handled special by gnome/kde/whatever.

    The mount points in /media are intended for removable media and /mnt
    is intended as a temporary mount point.
    (AJackson advised Luc to mount the newly formatted old windows partition
    on /mnt/hda1)

    Regards,

    Kees.

    --
    Kees Theunissen.

  14. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    Kees Theunissen wrote:
    > Keith Blow wrote:
    >> Luc The Perverse wrote:
    >>> Keith Blow wrote:

    >
    >>>> I have three partitions mounted at boot time, all three show up on the
    >>>> desktop. (gnome 2.18.3, debian testing)
    >>> Well my other partitions do not appear on the desktop - the ones I
    >>> installed - and if they did I would find a way to remove them because I
    >>> like "NOTHING" on my desktop unless I am actively working on it.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> LTP
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Agreed, in fact I'm more extreme, I don't use the desktop at all.
    >> Documents I'm working on can easily be found in the "recent documents"
    >> section of all the apps I'm using.
    >> The point I was making was that I have a setup which the previous poster
    >> said would ensure the drives don't appear on the Desktop, but they do.
    >> If you find out how to avoid this, please post the solution.
    >>

    >
    > I would start in such a case to experiment with different mount points.
    > Where did you mount those drives? I'm just guessing but I can imagine
    > that /mnt/* and /media/* are handled special by gnome/kde/whatever.
    >
    > The mount points in /media are intended for removable media and /mnt
    > is intended as a temporary mount point.
    > (AJackson advised Luc to mount the newly formatted old windows partition
    > on /mnt/hda1)
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Kees.
    >


    Ah is that my problem?

    I am still quite green to this whole mounnting and partitions idea -
    myself a recovering "Windows guy."

    --
    LTP



  15. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    Kees Theunissen wrote:
    > Keith Blow wrote:
    >> Luc The Perverse wrote:
    >>> Keith Blow wrote:

    >
    >>>> I have three partitions mounted at boot time, all three show up on the
    >>>> desktop. (gnome 2.18.3, debian testing)
    >>> Well my other partitions do not appear on the desktop - the ones I
    >>> installed - and if they did I would find a way to remove them because I
    >>> like "NOTHING" on my desktop unless I am actively working on it.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> LTP
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Agreed, in fact I'm more extreme, I don't use the desktop at all.
    >> Documents I'm working on can easily be found in the "recent documents"
    >> section of all the apps I'm using.
    >> The point I was making was that I have a setup which the previous poster
    >> said would ensure the drives don't appear on the Desktop, but they do.
    >> If you find out how to avoid this, please post the solution.
    >>

    >
    > I would start in such a case to experiment with different mount points.
    > Where did you mount those drives? I'm just guessing but I can imagine
    > that /mnt/* and /media/* are handled special by gnome/kde/whatever.
    >
    > The mount points in /media are intended for removable media and /mnt
    > is intended as a temporary mount point.
    > (AJackson advised Luc to mount the newly formatted old windows partition
    > on /mnt/hda1)
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Kees.
    >

    Nice idea but that's not the problem. Two are mounted under /mnt
    (windows vfat partitions) and one is an extra storage area mounted as
    /store (ext3).

    You are right about /media, if you don't have your cdrom in /etc/fstab
    it will show up on the desktop when you put a disk in. I think udev
    (hal?) handles that.

    --
    Keith Blow

  16. Re: Wipe and Reclaim NTFS Partition from Debian

    Keith Blow wrote:
    > Kees Theunissen wrote:
    >> Keith Blow wrote:
    >>> Luc The Perverse wrote:
    >>>> Keith Blow wrote:

    >>
    >>>>> I have three partitions mounted at boot time, all three show up on the
    >>>>> desktop. (gnome 2.18.3, debian testing)
    >>>> Well my other partitions do not appear on the desktop - the ones I
    >>>> installed - and if they did I would find a way to remove them because I
    >>>> like "NOTHING" on my desktop unless I am actively working on it.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> LTP
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Agreed, in fact I'm more extreme, I don't use the desktop at all.
    >>> Documents I'm working on can easily be found in the "recent documents"
    >>> section of all the apps I'm using.
    >>> The point I was making was that I have a setup which the previous poster
    >>> said would ensure the drives don't appear on the Desktop, but they do.
    >>> If you find out how to avoid this, please post the solution.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I would start in such a case to experiment with different mount points.
    >> Where did you mount those drives? I'm just guessing but I can imagine
    >> that /mnt/* and /media/* are handled special by gnome/kde/whatever.
    >>
    >> The mount points in /media are intended for removable media and /mnt
    >> is intended as a temporary mount point.
    >> (AJackson advised Luc to mount the newly formatted old windows partition
    >> on /mnt/hda1)
    >>
    >> Regards,
    >>
    >> Kees.
    >>

    > Nice idea but that's not the problem. Two are mounted under /mnt
    > (windows vfat partitions) and one is an extra storage area mounted as
    > /store (ext3).
    >
    > You are right about /media, if you don't have your cdrom in /etc/fstab
    > it will show up on the desktop when you put a disk in. I think udev
    > (hal?) handles that.
    >

    You can stop ALL the mounted icons appearing on the desktop (I have
    gnome 2.18.3):
    system tools->configuration editor->apps->nautilus->desktop
    uncheck "volumes visible"
    Now none of the volume icons will appear, not even the auto mounted
    ones. You will still get a browser window if you have that enabled in:
    System->Preferences->Removable drives and Media

    --
    Keith Blow

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