stereo component from laptop? - Debian

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Thread: stereo component from laptop?

  1. stereo component from laptop?

    Hi folks,

    as a result of various events, I have an extra laptop and no cd
    player, so I would like to convert the laptop into a stereo
    component. It's an HP Omnibook 4100, PII MMX 266, with 96 megs RAM, a
    pretty big hard drive (30 megs) and a CD-ROM (no DVD). I'm trying to
    figure out which audio player to use and, more generally, how to
    configure the interface for maximum efficiency and ease of use by my
    (non-technical) family members.

    Here's a few considerations:

    KERNEL:
    I want to support my PCMCIA wireless card, the suspend2 kernel patches
    from suspend2.net, and hopefully ACPI, so I think I will go with a
    recent 2.6 kernel and udev. I know this is a significant strain on
    the limited CPU/RAM resources, but I hope it's not fatal.

    GUI:
    When I had a little more RAM in this machine I used XFCE4, but I'm
    wondering if I should switch to something even more stripped down.
    Because security is of limited importance now (I'd want anyone to be
    able to just start the thing up) I would also be interested in
    dropping WDM and just starting X directly (I used to do that at one
    point; don't really remember how, but am sure I can dredge it back
    up). My only requirements are that it be pretty to look at and
    relatively intuitive for a Windows user (so, window behaviour should
    be pretty similar to 'doze).

    PLAYER:
    The idea would be to play mp3's and cd's off of this thing.

    My family hates using xmms; they find it hard to look at and a little
    disconcerting, I think mostly because ofthe multiple windows. Also
    there's no built-in playlist manager, which confuses them.

    I've lately taken to using Amarok on my desktop, which I find a pretty
    satisfying experience (though occacionally buggy, e.g. crashes when it
    encounters a radio stream it doesn't like). But I hesitate to install
    something that depends so heavily on the kde environment to work.
    Haven't used Rhythmbox for a while, but it used to crash on my all the
    time when I did use it. BMP is easier to look at than xmms is, but it
    still doesn't have a playlist manager (far as I can tell). [by
    playlist manager I mean a usable GUI that lets you choose among
    playlist you've created. Not sure this is the right term...]

    So none of the options with which I'm familiar seem perfect. Does
    anyone have any suggestions? Like, can amarok work without loading
    hundreds of megs of kde/qt stuff into memory? Is there a playlist
    manager plugin for bmp?

    It would be great if all of this worked well enough for a 10-year-old
    to be able to use it.

    SOUND DAEMON:
    I'm used to using esd , seems to work ifne, thought I'd stick with it
    unless there are other suggestions...

    Thanks much fory our help!

    Matt



    --------------------------
    .''`. Matt Price
    : :' : Debian User
    `. `'` & hemi-geek
    `-
    --------------------------


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  2. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    Heh, I'm in the process of a OSS project to build a standalone
    mp3/AAC/mp4/ogg/CD-Audio player, and its coming along nicely (well, it
    plays music - just need to sort out the LCD display + keypad, and I have
    not had much time to work on it lately).

    But that isn't done yet, so I can't recommend you use it just yet ;-)

    Currently (until the project is finished) what I did was to build an
    embedded system using the ESounD Daemon.

    Basically its an old 75Mhz laptop, with 8 mb ram, a pcmcia wifi card
    (atheros chipset) and a 16 bit soundcard. The custom distro initialises
    the sound and wifi card, connects to my wireless network
    and sets up a sound server. I can connect to it from any PC on the
    network and stream it music. This way me (and the rest of my family) can
    use their own computers (and the players they know) and stream music to
    the server, which is permanently connected to the HI-FI.

    Actually I was surprised how easy it was, and am considering making a
    few more of these to connect to other stereos, that way I can pick from
    my laptop where I want the music to emerge.

    Oh, and the distro fits on a 16mb CF card (it can fit in less, i'm
    saying about 4 meg, but I dont have a smaller CF card).

    If you want I can send you the .img file for my sound server (but just
    to tell you, some work will be required for configuration, probably
    changing the ESSID/IP Addr of the network, and possibly a kernel
    recompile for your wifi-card).

    If on the other hand, you want to use a standard distro, have a look at
    the ESD webpage
    (http://www.tux.org/~ricdude/EsounD.html). It hasn't been updated in a
    while, but the program has so far worked flawlessly. Just install that
    on your base distro and configure it - you will need a client-side
    plugin for it though, Most linux audio software supports it (i know
    there is a plugin for xmms) and i believe (but cannot confirm) that
    there exists a winamp plugin for it as well.

    Hope this reply was of any use :-)


    Matt Price wrote:

    >Hi folks,
    >
    >as a result of various events, I have an extra laptop and no cd
    >player, so I would like to convert the laptop into a stereo
    >component. It's an HP Omnibook 4100, PII MMX 266, with 96 megs RAM, a
    >pretty big hard drive (30 megs) and a CD-ROM (no DVD). I'm trying to
    >figure out which audio player to use and, more generally, how to
    >configure the interface for maximum efficiency and ease of use by my
    >(non-technical) family members.
    >
    >Here's a few considerations:
    >
    >KERNEL:
    >I want to support my PCMCIA wireless card, the suspend2 kernel patches
    >from suspend2.net, and hopefully ACPI, so I think I will go with a
    >recent 2.6 kernel and udev. I know this is a significant strain on
    >the limited CPU/RAM resources, but I hope it's not fatal.
    >
    >GUI:
    >When I had a little more RAM in this machine I used XFCE4, but I'm
    >wondering if I should switch to something even more stripped down.
    >Because security is of limited importance now (I'd want anyone to be
    >able to just start the thing up) I would also be interested in
    >dropping WDM and just starting X directly (I used to do that at one
    >point; don't really remember how, but am sure I can dredge it back
    >up). My only requirements are that it be pretty to look at and
    >relatively intuitive for a Windows user (so, window behaviour should
    >be pretty similar to 'doze).
    >
    >PLAYER:
    >The idea would be to play mp3's and cd's off of this thing.
    >
    >My family hates using xmms; they find it hard to look at and a little
    >disconcerting, I think mostly because ofthe multiple windows. Also
    >there's no built-in playlist manager, which confuses them.
    >
    >I've lately taken to using Amarok on my desktop, which I find a pretty
    >satisfying experience (though occacionally buggy, e.g. crashes when it
    >encounters a radio stream it doesn't like). But I hesitate to install
    >something that depends so heavily on the kde environment to work.
    >Haven't used Rhythmbox for a while, but it used to crash on my all the
    >time when I did use it. BMP is easier to look at than xmms is, but it
    >still doesn't have a playlist manager (far as I can tell). [by
    >playlist manager I mean a usable GUI that lets you choose among
    >playlist you've created. Not sure this is the right term...]
    >
    >So none of the options with which I'm familiar seem perfect. Does
    >anyone have any suggestions? Like, can amarok work without loading
    >hundreds of megs of kde/qt stuff into memory? Is there a playlist
    >manager plugin for bmp?
    >
    >It would be great if all of this worked well enough for a 10-year-old
    >to be able to use it.
    >
    >SOUND DAEMON:
    >I'm used to using esd , seems to work ifne, thought I'd stick with it
    >unless there are other suggestions...
    >
    >Thanks much fory our help!
    >
    >Matt
    >
    >
    >
    >--------------------------
    > .''`. Matt Price
    >: :' : Debian User
    >`. `'` & hemi-geek
    > `-
    >--------------------------
    >
    >
    >
    >




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  3. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    On Wed, 30 Nov 2005 13:17:56 -0500
    Matt Price wrote:

    > Hi folks,
    >
    > as a result of various events, I have an extra laptop and no cd
    > player, so I would like to convert the laptop into a stereo
    > component. It's an HP Omnibook 4100, PII MMX 266, with 96 megs RAM, a
    > pretty big hard drive (30 megs) and a CD-ROM (no DVD). I'm trying to
    > figure out which audio player to use and, more generally, how to
    > configure the interface for maximum efficiency and ease of use by my
    > (non-technical) family members.
    >
    > Here's a few considerations:
    >
    > KERNEL:
    > I want to support my PCMCIA wireless card, the suspend2 kernel patches
    > from suspend2.net, and hopefully ACPI, so I think I will go with a
    > recent 2.6 kernel and udev. I know this is a significant strain on
    > the limited CPU/RAM resources, but I hope it's not fatal.
    >
    > GUI:
    > When I had a little more RAM in this machine I used XFCE4, but I'm
    > wondering if I should switch to something even more stripped down.
    > Because security is of limited importance now (I'd want anyone to be
    > able to just start the thing up) I would also be interested in
    > dropping WDM and just starting X directly (I used to do that at one
    > point; don't really remember how, but am sure I can dredge it back
    > up). My only requirements are that it be pretty to look at and
    > relatively intuitive for a Windows user (so, window behaviour should
    > be pretty similar to 'doze).
    >
    > PLAYER:
    > The idea would be to play mp3's and cd's off of this thing.
    >
    > My family hates using xmms; they find it hard to look at and a little
    > disconcerting, I think mostly because ofthe multiple windows. Also
    > there's no built-in playlist manager, which confuses them.
    >
    > I've lately taken to using Amarok on my desktop, which I find a pretty
    > satisfying experience (though occacionally buggy, e.g. crashes when it
    > encounters a radio stream it doesn't like). But I hesitate to install
    > something that depends so heavily on the kde environment to work.
    > Haven't used Rhythmbox for a while, but it used to crash on my all the
    > time when I did use it. BMP is easier to look at than xmms is, but it
    > still doesn't have a playlist manager (far as I can tell). [by
    > playlist manager I mean a usable GUI that lets you choose among
    > playlist you've created. Not sure this is the right term...]
    >
    > So none of the options with which I'm familiar seem perfect. Does
    > anyone have any suggestions? Like, can amarok work without loading
    > hundreds of megs of kde/qt stuff into memory? Is there a playlist
    > manager plugin for bmp?
    >
    > It would be great if all of this worked well enough for a 10-year-old
    > to be able to use it.
    >
    > SOUND DAEMON:
    > I'm used to using esd , seems to work ifne, thought I'd stick with it
    > unless there are other suggestions...
    >
    > Thanks much fory our help!
    >
    > Matt


    Hi Matt

    Maybe it is wise to see what a normal desktop install of Debian 3.1 (Sarge) or Ubuntu 5.10 can do for you.
    I think it meets your requirements. On a side note: Totem is my favourite media player, but that is of course just an opinion.

    Linux can be tweaked and fine tuned to your desires, it is just a matter of doing it.

    For example suspend; downloading one of the latest kernel
    (e.g. http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kern...6.13.4.tar.bz2 )
    and the acpi patch
    (e.g. http://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kern....6.13.diff.bz2 )
    did the job on for me; that is suspend to memory and disk using acpi (forget apm in such case)

    Rob de Graaf


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  4. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    On 11/30/05, Ognjen Bezanov wrote:
    > Heh, I'm in the process of a OSS project to build a standalone
    > mp3/AAC/mp4/ogg/CD-Audio player, and its coming along nicely (well, it
    > plays music - just need to sort out the LCD display + keypad, and I have
    > not had much time to work on it lately).
    >
    > But that isn't done yet, so I can't recommend you use it just yet ;-)
    >
    > Currently (until the project is finished) what I did was to build an
    > embedded system using the ESounD Daemon.
    >
    > Basically its an old 75Mhz laptop, with 8 mb ram, a pcmcia wifi card
    > (atheros chipset) and a 16 bit soundcard. The custom distro initialises
    > the sound and wifi card, connects to my wireless network
    > and sets up a sound server. I can connect to it from any PC on the
    > network and stream it music. This way me (and the rest of my family) can
    > use their own computers (and the players they know) and stream music to
    > the server, which is permanently connected to the HI-FI.


    huh, this is very interesting. I would love to get the .img file --
    not exactly sure what a .img file is, but I have used files with this
    extension to start up qemu so I assumethis is some kind of disk
    image... At the least itwould be something to referto as Im building
    this up.

    The laptop I m looking at is considerably more powerful & the system I
    was thinking of is somewhat less ambitious -- the streaming probably
    isnt so important, though it would be lots of fun to implement. But
    Id like very much to seewhat youve done!


    >
    > Oh, and the distro fits on a 16mb CF card (it can fit in less, i'm
    > saying about 4 meg, but I dont have a smaller CF card).
    >
    > If you want I can send you the .img file for my sound server (but just
    > to tell you, some work will be required for configuration, probably
    > changing the ESSID/IP Addr of the network, and possibly a kernel
    > recompile for your wifi-card).


    shouldnt be so hard, from the sound of it.

    >
    > If on the other hand, you want to use a standard distro, have a look at
    > the ESD webpage
    > (http://www.tux.org/~ricdude/EsounD.html). It hasn't been updated in a
    > while, but the program has so far worked flawlessly. Just install that
    > on your base distro and configure it - you will need a client-side
    > plugin for it though, Most linux audio software supports it (i know
    > there is a plugin for xmms) and i believe (but cannot confirm) that
    > there exists a winamp plugin for it as well.
    >

    I think I wiill veyr likely use esd, thanks!

    > Hope this reply was of any use :-)
    >


    very interesting in any case!

    matt

  5. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    On 11/30/05, Matt Price wrote:
    > Hi folks,
    >
    > as a result of various events, I have an extra laptop and no cd
    > player, so I would like to convert the laptop into a stereo
    > component. It's an HP Omnibook 4100, PII MMX 266, with 96 megs RAM, a
    > pretty big hard drive (30 megs) and a CD-ROM (no DVD). I'm trying to

    ^ er, thats 30 gigs, sorry!

  6. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    Hopefully this is still of interest to the list, if not I'll move off
    line next time...


    On 12/1/05, Ognjen Bezanov wrote:
    > Matt Price wrote:
    > >huh, this is very interesting. I would love to get the .img file --
    > >not exactly sure what a .img file is, but I have used files with this
    > >extension to start up qemu so I assumethis is some kind of disk
    > >image... At the least itwould be something to referto as Im building
    > >this up.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > the .img is essentially a disk image, you can read from a disk to a .img
    > file:
    >
    > dd if=/dev/hdx of=/path/to/file.img
    >
    > or vice-versa:
    >
    > dd if=/path/to/file.img
    >
    > Also in linux you can mount the file and use it as you would a normal disk:
    >
    > mount -t [filesystem] /path/to/file.img /mount/point -o loop


    I'm trying to test this out before installing it. I can get the image
    to boot in qemu thus:

    qemu -boot c -hda sounderver.img -hdb qemu.img

    where qemu.img is a bank image produced as per qemu's instructions.

    however, it doesn't seem to do much and in particular I can't seem to open a vt
    to check out what's going on... Instead I am stuck at an interesting
    command prompt with a few lines of text (Welcometothe ESD server...
    etc).

    This may be intentional? for the stripped-down serverness of it.
    Then tried investigating thusly:

    sudo mount -t ext2 -o loop soundserver.img /mnt/soundserver/

    but it won't mount, giving a "wrong fs" error of the kind I've
    sometimes seen when forgetting to add "-t iso9660" while attempting to
    mount a cd. so not sure whether I'm doing something wrong, or whether
    perhaps you use a special fs (reiser?)

    so anyway, if you get this, let me know if you have any suggestions!

    thanks,

    matt


    > >

    > Oh, and feel free to contact me if you need help!
    >
    >


  7. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    Matt Price wrote:

    >Hopefully this is still of interest to the list, if not I'll move off
    >line next time...
    >
    >
    >

    likewise - I'm not sure, for one thing its not to do with debian (its a
    custom system, built using gentoo if it interests anyone) but its to do
    with laptops. Ill keep it here for now.

    >On 12/1/05, Ognjen Bezanov wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Matt Price wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>huh, this is very interesting. I would love to get the .img file --
    >>>not exactly sure what a .img file is, but I have used files with this
    >>>extension to start up qemu so I assumethis is some kind of disk
    >>>image... At the least itwould be something to referto as Im building
    >>>this up.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>the .img is essentially a disk image, you can read from a disk to a .img
    >>file:
    >>
    >>dd if=/dev/hdx of=/path/to/file.img
    >>
    >>or vice-versa:
    >>
    >>dd if=/path/to/file.img
    >>
    >>Also in linux you can mount the file and use it as you would a normal disk:
    >>
    >>mount -t [filesystem] /path/to/file.img /mount/point -o loop
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I'm trying to test this out before installing it. I can get the image
    >to boot in qemu thus:
    >
    >qemu -boot c -hda sounderver.img -hdb qemu.img
    >
    >where qemu.img is a bank image produced as per qemu's instructions.
    >
    >
    >

    qemu? what exactly is it. Is it an emulator? can I run other linux
    systems in it - does it use the host kernel or its own? in which case I
    should have known that earlier, it would have made my life debugging
    this system sooo much easier.

    >however, it doesn't seem to do much and in particular I can't seem to open a vt
    >to check out what's going on... Instead I am stuck at an interesting
    >command prompt with a few lines of text (Welcometothe ESD server...
    >etc).
    >
    >This may be intentional? for the stripped-down serverness of it.
    >Then tried investigating thusly:
    >
    >
    >

    Yep, it doesn't open a terminal, for me it wasn't required (but perhaps
    it may be better to add one, I havent got round to it yet, but if I do,
    beware it will be quite limited in its use), on the prompt it should
    tell you the ip address and port to connect to. Also during startup you
    should hear a quick melody play (as a sign that the system is properly
    initialised and that it detected the soundcard). Hence make sure your
    computer is plugged in / speakers are turned up .

    If you do not get this, try looking at the messages on your screen
    (r-shift + pgUp/pgDown) to see if its detecting the soundcard. if not,
    then you probably will need to recompile the kernel for your
    soundcard.

    If you did hear it, then it should be all ok, try connecting to the
    system with a client (e.g. xmms esound plugin).

    The problem is that in my quest for the smallest possible system, I
    probably stripped all the kernel stuff out except what was in my laptop
    (an old cirrus logic soundcard, an atheros wifi card, and a NE2000
    ethernet pcmcia card).

    >sudo mount -t ext2 -o loop soundserver.img /mnt/soundserver/
    >
    >but it won't mount, giving a "wrong fs" error of the kind I've
    >sometimes seen when forgetting to add "-t iso9660" while attempting to
    >mount a cd. so not sure whether I'm doing something wrong, or whether
    >perhaps you use a special fs (reiser?)
    >
    >
    >

    the problem with this image file is that it has its mbr and bootloader
    built-in (i.e. this image is meant for burning to a proper disk drive
    first, until someone works out how to skip the bootloader directly).

    This is not a pure fs-image, hence it cannot be mounted like that. I'm
    sure there is a way though (i just dont know how).

    Essentially what you are instructing your computer to do is mount grub
    as /mnt/soundserver, which won't work.

    The image layout looks like this:

    [ mbr [grub stage 1] ][grub stage 2][============ ext2 root fs
    ==============]

    and when you try to mount it, it looks in the mbr/grub area for a
    filesystem, doesnt find one, and returns an error.

    The Filesystem I use is ext2.

    >so anyway, if you get this, let me know if you have any suggestions!
    >
    >
    >

    well, if you (or anyone on this mailing list) knows how to skip the
    boot part of the .img file and mount the 1st partition (the rootfs)
    directly let me know.

    Another way is if you have a drive (e.g. USB memory key/ hard disk)
    lying about. Provided its greater then 16mb you can dd the image file to
    that, and then mount /dev/hdx1 as ext2.

    If there is no way, I can send you the filesystem as an img file
    seperately (which you can mount), but then you will have to install
    grub yourself on the drive for it to boot on its own.

    >thanks,
    >
    >matt
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>Oh, and feel free to contact me if you need help!
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >




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  8. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    Matt Price wrote:

    >On 11/30/05, Ognjen Bezanov wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Heh, I'm in the process of a OSS project to build a standalone
    >>mp3/AAC/mp4/ogg/CD-Audio player, and its coming along nicely (well, it
    >>plays music - just need to sort out the LCD display + keypad, and I have
    >>not had much time to work on it lately).
    >>
    >>But that isn't done yet, so I can't recommend you use it just yet ;-)
    >>
    >>Currently (until the project is finished) what I did was to build an
    >>embedded system using the ESounD Daemon.
    >>
    >>Basically its an old 75Mhz laptop, with 8 mb ram, a pcmcia wifi card
    >>(atheros chipset) and a 16 bit soundcard. The custom distro initialises
    >>the sound and wifi card, connects to my wireless network
    >>and sets up a sound server. I can connect to it from any PC on the
    >>network and stream it music. This way me (and the rest of my family) can
    >>use their own computers (and the players they know) and stream music to
    >>the server, which is permanently connected to the HI-FI.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >huh, this is very interesting. I would love to get the .img file --
    >not exactly sure what a .img file is, but I have used files with this
    >extension to start up qemu so I assumethis is some kind of disk
    >image... At the least itwould be something to referto as Im building
    >this up.
    >
    >
    >

    the .img is essentially a disk image, you can read from a disk to a .img
    file:

    dd if=/dev/hdx of=/path/to/file.img

    or vice-versa:

    dd if=/path/to/file.img

    Also in linux you can mount the file and use it as you would a normal disk:

    mount -t [filesystem] /path/to/file.img /mount/point -o loop

    and you can use just about any filesystem on it (e.g FAT, ext, reiser,
    swap, jfs etc...)

    mkfs.ext2 /path/to/file.img

    and they are also used for filesystem encryption.


    >The laptop I m looking at is considerably more powerful & the system I
    >was thinking of is somewhat less ambitious -- the streaming probably
    >isnt so important, though it would be lots of fun to implement. But
    >Id like very much to seewhat youve done!
    >
    >
    >
    >

    ok, you can find it here: http://88.144.22.90/~ognen/soundserver.img
    (note link is not permanent, size 16MB).

    Burn it to your disk using the dd command (dd if=./soundserver.img
    of=/path/to/disk)

    Then you should be able to mount the rootfs and edit the config file
    (which is /etc/init.d/S01).

    this is a shell script, and you can probably see some standard commands
    on it.

    Note that while this system works - it needs a little cleaning in order
    to be more efficient (and needs a better init script). Also note that
    the image is currently configured to use a wired interface, you need to
    uncomment the line required to set the wireless card.


    >
    >
    >>Oh, and the distro fits on a 16mb CF card (it can fit in less, i'm
    >>saying about 4 meg, but I dont have a smaller CF card).
    >>
    >>If you want I can send you the .img file for my sound server (but just
    >>to tell you, some work will be required for configuration, probably
    >>changing the ESSID/IP Addr of the network, and possibly a kernel
    >>recompile for your wifi-card).
    >>
    >>

    >
    >shouldnt be so hard, from the sound of it.
    >
    >
    >
    >>If on the other hand, you want to use a standard distro, have a look at
    >>the ESD webpage
    >>(http://www.tux.org/~ricdude/EsounD.html). It hasn't been updated in a
    >>while, but the program has so far worked flawlessly. Just install that
    >>on your base distro and configure it - you will need a client-side
    >>plugin for it though, Most linux audio software supports it (i know
    >>there is a plugin for xmms) and i believe (but cannot confirm) that
    >>there exists a winamp plugin for it as well.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >I think I wiill veyr likely use esd, thanks!
    >
    >
    >
    >>Hope this reply was of any use :-)
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >very interesting in any case!
    >
    >matt
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Oh, and feel free to contact me if you need help!


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  9. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    On Thu, Dec 01, 2005 at 04:30:45PM -0500, Matt Price wrote:

    [...]

    > Then tried investigating thusly:
    >
    > sudo mount -t ext2 -o loop soundserver.img /mnt/soundserver/
    >
    > but it won't mount, giving a "wrong fs" error of the kind I've
    > sometimes seen when forgetting to add "-t iso9660" while attempting to
    > mount a cd. so not sure whether I'm doing something wrong, or whether
    > perhaps you use a special fs (reiser?)


    You shouldn't need to specify the filesystem type; I'll bet what you
    have is actually not a partition image, but a disk image. This is
    different: the disk image has a partition table in front of it, not
    a filesystem. You need to instruct mount to seek to the appropriate
    partition within the disk image using the "offset" option. First, do
    this:

    /sbin/fdisk -l soundserver.img

    and see if you get a partition table. If you do, then the above
    diagnosis is correct. In that case, here's a dirty little perl snippet
    I have used to mount the first partition in a disk image. You will have
    to modify it if you want to specify a different partition.

    #!/usr/bin/perl -w
    @ARGV == 2 || die "$0: bad usage\n";
    $f = shift;
    $d = shift;
    -f $f && -r $f || die "$0: $f: $!\n";
    -d $d || die "$0: $d: $!\n";

    $ptable = qx(sfdisk -d "$f") || die "$0: sfdisk failed\n";
    $ptable =~ m/^\s*${f}1\s+:\s+start=\s*(\d+)/m || die "$0: bad sfdisk output?";
    # ^
    # The partition to mount is hard-coded to "1" here.
    $offset = $1 * 512;

    exec "mount -o loop,offset=$offset $f $d";


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  10. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    d@jerkface.net wrote:

    >On Thu, Dec 01, 2005 at 04:30:45PM -0500, Matt Price wrote:
    >
    >[...]
    >
    >
    >
    >>Then tried investigating thusly:
    >>
    >>sudo mount -t ext2 -o loop soundserver.img /mnt/soundserver/
    >>
    >>but it won't mount, giving a "wrong fs" error of the kind I've
    >>sometimes seen when forgetting to add "-t iso9660" while attempting to
    >>mount a cd. so not sure whether I'm doing something wrong, or whether
    >>perhaps you use a special fs (reiser?)
    >>
    >>

    >
    >You shouldn't need to specify the filesystem type; I'll bet what you
    >have is actually not a partition image, but a disk image. This is
    >different: the disk image has a partition table in front of it, not
    >a filesystem. You need to instruct mount to seek to the appropriate
    >partition within the disk image using the "offset" option. First, do
    >this:
    >
    >/sbin/fdisk -l soundserver.img
    >
    >and see if you get a partition table. If you do, then the above
    >diagnosis is correct. In that case, here's a dirty little perl snippet
    >I have used to mount the first partition in a disk image. You will have
    >to modify it if you want to specify a different partition.
    >
    >#!/usr/bin/perl -w
    >@ARGV == 2 || die "$0: bad usage\n";
    >$f = shift;
    >$d = shift;
    >-f $f && -r $f || die "$0: $f: $!\n";
    >-d $d || die "$0: $d: $!\n";
    >
    >$ptable = qx(sfdisk -d "$f") || die "$0: sfdisk failed\n";
    >$ptable =~ m/^\s*${f}1\s+:\s+start=\s*(\d+)/m || die "$0: bad sfdisk output?";
    ># ^
    ># The partition to mount is hard-coded to "1" here.
    >$offset = $1 * 512;
    >
    >exec "mount -o loop,offset=$offset $f $d";
    >
    >
    >
    >

    ooh thankyou! I knew there must have been a way of doing it! you have
    saved me a lot of hassle (e.g. having to manage multiple images for
    people). I was worrying about that. I found this so useful I think ill
    print it and stick it on my wall...

    (for those that are interested) And the image file I provided has its
    root fs on the first partition, so no modification of this script whould
    be needed in order to mount it.


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  11. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    On 12/1/05, Ognjen Bezanov wrote:
    > d@jerkface.net wrote:
    >

    [...]
    > >and see if you get a partition table. If you do, then the above
    > >diagnosis is correct. In that case, here's a dirty little perl snippet
    > >I have used to mount the first partition in a disk image. You will have
    > >to modify it if you want to specify a different partition.
    > >
    > >

    > ooh thankyou! I knew there must have been a way of doing it! you have
    > saved me a lot of hassle (e.g. having to manage multiple images for
    > people). I was worrying about that. I found this so useful I think ill
    > print it and stick it on my wall...
    >
    > (for those that are interested) And the image file I provided has its
    > root fs on the first partition, so no modification of this script whould
    > be needed in order to mount it.
    >
    >

    wow, that was way cool. thanks, d. Ognjen, this is a sweet little
    setup. I will probably give something less compact a whirl first, as
    I have way more machine at my disposal than this requires -- but it's
    incredible how tiny you've made this, I'm very impressed and I have a
    strong urge to drop what I'm doing & start fooling around with the
    TRULY ancient laptops I have lying around (one 286...).

    meanwhile, re qemu:

    yes, this is an emulator; it's fairly unbelievably cool. To try it
    out, you can just apt-get install qemu; but it works much better with
    the third-party kernel module enabled; to use this you have to
    uninstall the debian qemu package, then download the source for qemu
    and kqemu (the kernel bits), and make your own package. I forget
    exactly how I did that, but I think I followed instructions off of the
    qemu website and then installed the resultant package using
    checkinstall (so that it is still registered in the packaging system).
    I recommend it VERY strongly. If nothing else it's good forthat last
    little bit of windows garbage that you are stuck with because of work
    or something.

    Matt

  12. Re: stereo component from laptop?

    On Wed, Nov 30, 2005 at 01:17:56PM -0500, Matt Price wrote:
    >Hi folks,
    >
    >as a result of various events, I have an extra laptop and no cd
    >player, so I would like to convert the laptop into a stereo
    >component. It's an HP Omnibook 4100, PII MMX 266, with 96 megs RAM, a
    >pretty big hard drive (30 megs) and a CD-ROM (no DVD). I'm trying to
    >figure out which audio player to use and, more generally, how to
    >configure the interface for maximum efficiency and ease of use by my
    >(non-technical) family members.
    >


    You might want to also check out the agnula project:

    http://www.demudi.org/

    They have a debian based distro focused on multimedia applications.

    Might give you some ideas. Also, I highly recomend Amarok for
    organizing/playing your music collection.


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