How does one control fans? - Debian

This is a discussion on How does one control fans? - Debian ; I'm gradually inching my way to total control of my laptop, but now I would like a bit of peace and quiet every now and then. In XPland, the fan is more off than on, in Linux, it's rarely off ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: How does one control fans?

  1. How does one control fans?

    I'm gradually inching my way to total control of my laptop, but now I
    would like a bit of peace and quiet every now and then. In XPland, the
    fan is more off than on, in Linux, it's rarely off at all.

    How do I start to get a grip on a peaceful Tux experience?

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  2. Re: How does one control fans?

    marc said...
    > I'm gradually inching my way to total control of my laptop, but now I
    > would like a bit of peace and quiet every now and then. In XPland, the
    > fan is more off than on, in Linux, it's rarely off at all.
    >
    > How do I start to get a grip on a peaceful Tux experience?


    I should have added that this is for an Acer TM4650 series.

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  3. Re: How does one control fans?

    On Wed, 2005-10-12 at 23:08 +0100, marc wrote:
    > I'm gradually inching my way to total control of my laptop, but now I
    > would like a bit of peace and quiet every now and then. In XPland, the
    > fan is more off than on, in Linux, it's rarely off at all.
    >
    > How do I start to get a grip on a peaceful Tux experience?


    I think it could be too things: Either the system is running too hot, or
    the fans kick in too soon.

    If your system is really running too hot (more so than when running XP),
    look at what process is taking CPU time. Or maybe you aren't using
    throttling, so the CPU is always running at full speed? In that case,
    enable CPU frequency scaling and make sure it runs with the right
    governor (probably 'conservative').

    Otherwise, maybe the thermal trip points are too low. Look
    at /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature to determine the temperature
    according to the system. Then look
    at /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/trip_points to see the trip points. In
    my case, it shows something like

    critical (S5): 100 C
    passive: 92 C: blabla
    active[0]: 66 C: blabla
    active[1]: 63 C: blabla

    This means that at 63 degrees, the fan (FAN1) starts blowing, at 66
    degrees FAN0 also starts, at 92 degrees the system is throttled, and at
    100 degrees it's turned off. Also, my current temperature is 42 degrees,
    and the fans are indeed turned off.

    For more information, look at
    http://acpi.sourceforge.net/documentation/thermal.html

    Koen


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  4. Re: How does one control fans?

    Koen Vermeer said...
    > On Wed, 2005-10-12 at 23:08 +0100, marc wrote:
    > > I'm gradually inching my way to total control of my laptop, but now I
    > > would like a bit of peace and quiet every now and then. In XPland, the
    > > fan is more off than on, in Linux, it's rarely off at all.
    > >
    > > How do I start to get a grip on a peaceful Tux experience?

    >
    > I think it could be too things: Either the system is running too hot, or
    > the fans kick in too soon.


    Yup, I agree that those are the two scenarios.

    > If your system is really running too hot (more so than when running XP),
    > look at what process is taking CPU time.


    It isn't this, because the air being expelled is barely discernibly
    warmer than room temperature - and the room is quite cool.

    > Or maybe you aren't using
    > throttling, so the CPU is always running at full speed? In that case,
    > enable CPU frequency scaling and make sure it runs with the right
    > governor (probably 'conservative').


    Ah, something else to explore. I installed the cpudyn package and that
    stops the fan a little. However, reading man cpudyn, it mentions that
    throttling is integrated into kernel from 2.6 on - I'm using 2.6.13.
    When I removed it, and rebooted, the fan went back to never switching
    off.

    I noticed that a lot of folk use
    # modprobe cpufreq_userspace
    so I loaded that, which at least stops the fan from time to time,
    although I have no idea what it does! (Despite goggling for a while...)
    That said, it seemed to have created the /proc/acpi/processor/ chain.

    Which modules and packages are the "best" too use, or to start with?

    > Otherwise, maybe the thermal trip points are too low. Look
    > at /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature to determine the temperature
    > according to the system.


    I don't have /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/ :-(

    > Then look
    > at /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/trip_points to see the trip points. In
    > my case, it shows something like
    >
    > critical (S5): 100 C
    > passive: 92 C: blabla
    > active[0]: 66 C: blabla
    > active[1]: 63 C: blabla
    >
    > This means that at 63 degrees, the fan (FAN1) starts blowing, at 66
    > degrees FAN0 also starts, at 92 degrees the system is throttled, and at
    > 100 degrees it's turned off. Also, my current temperature is 42 degrees,
    > and the fans are indeed turned off.
    >
    > For more information, look at
    > http://acpi.sourceforge.net/documentation/thermal.html


    Should I install acpi? I see a debian acpi package, but it appears to be
    different to the stuff on that web-site.

    I'm also on a hunt for the speedstep_centrino module, which bombs when I
    try to load it. I'm guessing that this requires a kernel rebuild... but
    who knows!

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  5. Re: How does one control fans?

    Le Thu, Oct 13, 2005 at 11:29:05AM +0100, marc écrivait/wrote:

    > Ah, something else to explore. I installed the cpudyn package and that
    > stops the fan a little. However, reading man cpudyn, it mentions that
    > throttling is integrated into kernel from 2.6 on - I'm using 2.6.13.
    > When I removed it, and rebooted, the fan went back to never switching
    > off. [...]


    > I noticed that a lot of folk use
    > # modprobe cpufreq_userspace
    > so I loaded that, which at least stops the fan from time to time,
    > although I have no idea what it does! (Despite goggling for a while...)
    > That said, it seemed to have created the /proc/acpi/processor/ chain.


    > Which modules and packages are the "best" too use, or to start with?

    [....]

    > Should I install acpi? I see a debian acpi package, but it appears to be
    > different to the stuff on that web-site.


    I would suggest using the cpufreq_userspace, thermal, acpi_cpufreq and
    other modules and also use acpid and cpudyn (or cpufreqd or
    powernowd). I'm not understanding every detail, but it seems that you
    need all of them. The kernel modules are used by the user-land
    cpufreqd and acpid.

    The acpi and yacpi commands report to the user the state of the system
    (including thermal and power states).

    You might be interested in having a look at
    http://starynkevitch.net/Basile/msi_s270_linux.html which details the
    configuration of my laptop. But I don't claim to understand all the
    issues involved.... (laptop hardware is becoming quite complex, with
    lots of legacy physical devices)

    Regards
    --
    Basile STARYNKEVITCH http://starynkevitch.net/Basile/
    email: basile(at)starynkevitch(dot)net
    8, rue de la Faïencerie, 92340 Bourg La Reine, France


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  6. Re: How does one control fans?

    On Thu, 2005-10-13 at 13:13 +0200, Koen Vermeer wrote:
    > The acpi package contains the acpi daemon, which you may use to do
    > something when an acpi event (closing the lid, pressing the power
    > button, etc.) occurs.


    I'm sorry: The acpi package just shows some information it gets from the
    acpi. I was talking about the acpid package.

    Koen


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  7. Re: How does one control fans?

    On Thursday 13 October 2005 12:29, marc wrote:
    > Should I install acpi? I see a debian acpi package, but it appears to
    > be different to the stuff on that web-site.


    Yes, the acpi and acpid packages are pretty much standard for more modern
    hardware. Installing them may even fix your problem.

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.4.1 (GNU/Linux)

    iD8DBQBDTkGNgm/Kwh6ICoQRAor+AKDWew/sYVtVAt3erZIa1AQRIlw62gCeN6L5
    Tze8m7YD0Bp8wa0uK9jPJvY=
    =JRWS
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


  8. Re: How does one control fans?

    On Thu, 2005-10-13 at 11:29 +0100, marc wrote:
    > Ah, something else to explore. I installed the cpudyn package and that

    [...]
    > Which modules and packages are the "best" too use, or to start with?


    The userspace governor is just a kind of man-in-the-middle, allowing
    userspace programs, such as cupfreqd, to set the cpu frequency. In the
    early days, I had that one on my laptop. But then new kernel governors
    appeared, such as 'conservative'. Basically, this governor reduces the
    frequency when the system is not doing much, and increases it when it
    gets busy. You can tune some parameters, such as the thresholds.

    I don't know what's included in your kernel. But what you'll need to do
    is enable CPU frequency scaling, select a default governor (I chose
    'performance'), and select the governors you want to use (so I added
    'conservative'). Either include them in the kernel or compile them as
    modules and load them. You can then look
    at /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_available_governors for
    a list of governors that are available, and choose one by writing its
    name to /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor. I might
    have missed a step, so if it doesn't work, simply Google around.

    > > Otherwise, maybe the thermal trip points are too low. Look
    > > at /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature to determine the temperature
    > > according to the system.

    > I don't have /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/ :-(


    Do you have CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL set? Your /var/log/messages should show
    something like 'ACPI: Thermal Zone [THRM] (xx C)'.

    > Should I install acpi? I see a debian acpi package, but it appears to be
    > different to the stuff on that web-site.


    The acpi package contains the acpi daemon, which you may use to do
    something when an acpi event (closing the lid, pressing the power
    button, etc.) occurs.

    > I'm also on a hunt for the speedstep_centrino module, which bombs when I
    > try to load it. I'm guessing that this requires a kernel rebuild... but
    > who knows!


    What do you mean by 'it bombs'? I guess you need one of those drivers,
    because otherwise cpufreq probably has no way to change the frequency of
    the processor.

    Koen


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  9. Re: How does one control fans?

    > Ah, something else to explore. I installed the cpudyn package and that
    > stops the fan a little. However, reading man cpudyn, it mentions that
    > throttling is integrated into kernel from 2.6 on - I'm using 2.6.13.
    > When I removed it, and rebooted, the fan went back to never switching
    > off.
    >
    > I noticed that a lot of folk use
    > # modprobe cpufreq_userspace
    > so I loaded that, which at least stops the fan from time to time,
    > although I have no idea what it does! (Despite goggling for a while...)
    > That said, it seemed to have created the /proc/acpi/processor/ chain.
    >
    > Which modules and packages are the "best" too use, or to start with?


    I would rather use the direct kernel functions to control the frequency (as
    opposed to using the cpufreq_userspace and a userspace program). That means
    you should for example
    # modprobe cpufreq_ondemand

    and tell the kernel to use the ondemand governor for frequency scaling:
    # echo "ondemand" > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor
    (you will have to do that every time you boot, so add a script to your
    runlevel)

    The only disadvantage of the direct kernel method is, that you won't be able
    to scale the frequency according to battery/AC-adapter status, which some of
    the userspace programs will.

    Hope that helps a bit, feel free to ask further questions.


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  10. Re: How does one control fans?

    Frans Pop said...
    > On Thursday 13 October 2005 12:29, marc wrote:
    > > Should I install acpi? I see a debian acpi package, but it appears to
    > > be different to the stuff on that web-site.

    >
    > Yes, the acpi and acpid packages are pretty much standard for more modern
    > hardware. Installing them may even fix your problem.


    Ah ha! Now I have a load more entries in /proc/acpi

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  11. Re: How does one control fans?

    Koen Vermeer said...
    > On Thu, 2005-10-13 at 11:29 +0100, marc wrote:
    > > Ah, something else to explore. I installed the cpudyn package and that

    > [...]
    > > Which modules and packages are the "best" too use, or to start with?

    >
    > The userspace governor is just a kind of man-in-the-middle, allowing
    > userspace programs, such as cupfreqd, to set the cpu frequency. In the
    > early days, I had that one on my laptop. But then new kernel governors
    > appeared, such as 'conservative'. Basically, this governor reduces the
    > frequency when the system is not doing much, and increases it when it
    > gets busy. You can tune some parameters, such as the thresholds.
    >
    > I don't know what's included in your kernel. But what you'll need to do
    > is enable CPU frequency scaling, select a default governor (I chose
    > 'performance'), and select the governors you want to use (so I added
    > 'conservative'). Either include them in the kernel or compile them as
    > modules and load them. You can then look
    > at /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_available_governors for
    > a list of governors that are available, and choose one by writing its
    > name to /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor. I might
    > have missed a step, so if it doesn't work, simply Google around.


    I've installed packages: acpi and acpid
    and the fan now stops occasionally. Magically, something called,
    KLaptop, has appeared in the KDE system tray, presenting lots of options
    to manage ACPI features.

    These packages also installed the modules: thermal, fan, button,
    processor, ac and battery.

    I loaded cpufreq_userspace or acpi_cpufreq, but these seem to only
    provide "power profiles" - which I can select in KLaptop - or
    "governors", but I can't find out what they do precisely.

    I have a handle on 'governors', including those in the kernel, now.
    However, after I modprobe the kernel governors, nothing appears in
    /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/ until I modprobe acpi_cpufreq.

    Is this correct? Is there another way to activate
    /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq without loading this module and its
    'performance' governor?

    > > > Otherwise, maybe the thermal trip points are too low. Look
    > > > at /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/THRM/temperature to determine the temperature
    > > > according to the system.

    > > I don't have /proc/acpi/thermal_zone/ :-(

    >
    > Do you have CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL set? Your /var/log/messages should show
    > something like 'ACPI: Thermal Zone [THRM] (xx C)'.


    Yes, CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL is set to m. There are no references to thermal
    in the ACPI messages :-( The thermal module is loaded.

    # acpi -V says,
    No support for device type: thermal
    AC adaper: on-line

    So, I guess that thermal detection is not possible, unless there is
    something else that needs to be done. Clearly, there is thermal
    detection in operation, and it seems odd that it is not, apparently,
    under the control of ACPI.

    > > I'm also on a hunt for the speedstep_centrino module, which bombs when I
    > > try to load it. I'm guessing that this requires a kernel rebuild... but
    > > who knows!

    >
    > What do you mean by 'it bombs'? I guess you need one of those drivers,
    > because otherwise cpufreq probably has no way to change the frequency of
    > the processor.


    mote:~# modprobe speedstep-centrino
    FATAL: Error inserting speedstep_centrino
    (/lib/modules/2.6.13.3marc.13.1.1/kernel/arch/i386/kernel/cpu/cpufreq/sp
    eedstep-centrino.ko): No such device

    mote:~# locate speedstep-centrino.ko
    /lib/modules/2.6.13.3marc.13.1.1/kernel/arch/i386/kernel/cpu/cpufreq/spe
    edstep-centrino.ko
    /usr/src/linux-2.6.13.3/arch/i386/kernel/cpu/cpufreq/.speedstep-
    centrino.ko.cmd
    /usr/src/linux-2.6.13.3/arch/i386/kernel/cpu/cpufreq/speedstep-
    centrino.ko
    mote:/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0#

    CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO=m
    CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO_ACPI=y
    CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO_TABLE=y
    CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_ICH=m
    CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_SMI=m

    CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_LIB=m
    CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_RELAXED_CAP_CHECK=y

    Note that I didn't compile my kernel specifically for Pentium M, since I
    simply did a make oldconfig.

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  12. Re: How does one control fans?

    Frank said...
    > > I noticed that a lot of folk use
    > > # modprobe cpufreq_userspace
    > > so I loaded that, which at least stops the fan from time to time,
    > > although I have no idea what it does! (Despite goggling for a while...)
    > > That said, it seemed to have created the /proc/acpi/processor/ chain.
    > >
    > > Which modules and packages are the "best" too use, or to start with?

    >
    > I would rather use the direct kernel functions to control the frequency (as
    > opposed to using the cpufreq_userspace and a userspace program). That means
    > you should for example
    > # modprobe cpufreq_ondemand


    Yes, now I understand the mechanism, that's my plan.

    > and tell the kernel to use the ondemand governor for frequency scaling:
    > # echo "ondemand" > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor


    My problem is that /cpufreq/scaling_governor doesn't appear until after
    I do:
    # modprobe acpi_cpufreq
    Is that correct?

    > (you will have to do that every time you boot, so add a script to your
    > runlevel)


    What? And miss out on all that typing?

    > The only disadvantage of the direct kernel method is, that you won't be able
    > to scale the frequency according to battery/AC-adapter status, which some of
    > the userspace programs will.


    That's okay. The recommendation in the kernel config notes is to use
    'conservative' as the battery-alternative to 'ondemand', so I'll use a
    script to make the change, as necessary.

    > Hope that helps a bit, feel free to ask further questions.


    It helps a lot. Thanks to all for all the assistance and suggestions.

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  13. Re: How does one control fans?

    > > and tell the kernel to use the ondemand governor for frequency scaling:
    > > # echo "ondemand" > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor

    >
    > My problem is that /cpufreq/scaling_governor doesn't appear until after
    > I do:
    > # modprobe acpi_cpufreq
    > Is that correct?


    I am not sure about that one. I don't have this module loaded (even gives a
    "busy" error when modprobing it) and still have the /cpufreq/scaling_governor
    available. But I am on the AMD64 kernel, which might be different from x86.

    > > (you will have to do that every time you boot, so add a script to your
    > > runlevel)

    >
    > What? And miss out on all that typing?


    If you don't compile your own kernel, you are stuck with the options the
    Debian default kernel uses. This means, it will use the "performance" governor
    as default governor. So I wrote a small script, which I put into /etc/init.d
    and link into runlevel 2, to select the "ondemand" governor, e.g.:
    ______________________________________________
    #! /bin/sh

    PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin
    NAME=cpufreq_ondemand
    DESC=cpufreq_ondemand

    case "$1" in
    start)
    echo -n "Starting $DESC: "
    echo "ondemand" > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor
    echo "$NAME started."
    ;;
    stop)
    echo -n "Stopping $DESC: "
    echo "performance" > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor
    echo "$NAME stopped."
    ;;
    *)
    N=/etc/init.d/$NAME
    echo "Usage: $N {start|stop}" >&2
    exit 1
    ;;
    esac

    exit 0
    ______________________________________________


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  14. Re: How does one control fans?

    On Thu, 2005-10-13 at 18:52 +0100, marc wrote:
    > I've installed packages: acpi and acpid
    > and the fan now stops occasionally. Magically, something called,
    > KLaptop, has appeared in the KDE system tray, presenting lots of options
    > to manage ACPI features.


    I don't use KDE, so I don't know KLaptop. I hear some good stories about
    it, but as I don't use it, I have other ways of achieving probably the
    same goals. So, it might be that you are doing things just differently,
    not necessarily wrong.

    > These packages also installed the modules: thermal, fan, button,
    > processor, ac and battery.


    OK, so maybe there is some ACPI related problem, because I'd say it
    would need to give you something along the lines of what I wrote before.
    Maybe take it to the ACPI people if it really doesn't work. Or try a new
    BIOS. Or wait for a new kernel, with updated ACPI. Or try to debug your
    DSDT. Or... :-)

    > I loaded cpufreq_userspace or acpi_cpufreq, but these seem to only
    > provide "power profiles" - which I can select in KLaptop - or
    > "governors", but I can't find out what they do precisely.


    See above; I don't know about KLaptop...

    > I have a handle on 'governors', including those in the kernel, now.
    > However, after I modprobe the kernel governors, nothing appears in
    > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/ until I modprobe acpi_cpufreq.
    > Is this correct? Is there another way to activate
    > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq without loading this module and its
    > 'performance' governor?


    You need a cpufreq governor, and a cpufreq processor driver.
    acpi_cpufreq is a cpufreq processor driver, but not the optimal one.
    Once you've got this loaded, or any other processor driver, then you
    should be able to load any governor you want.

    > Yes, CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL is set to m. There are no references to thermal
    > in the ACPI messages :-( The thermal module is loaded.
    > # acpi -V says,
    > No support for device type: thermal
    > AC adaper: on-line
    > So, I guess that thermal detection is not possible, unless there is
    > something else that needs to be done. Clearly, there is thermal
    > detection in operation, and it seems odd that it is not, apparently,
    > under the control of ACPI.


    I think it is most likely under ACPI control, but there just a
    miscommunication between the OS ACPI stuff and the BIOS ACPI stuff. I
    don't know how to debug that.

    > CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO=m
    > CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO_ACPI=y
    > CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO_TABLE=y


    The last one isn't required, but I'd say it doesn't hurt either. I'm
    sorry, I think it should work, so I don't know where to look to debug
    it. You could stick to the ACPI cpufreq driver for now, just to get the
    cpufreq governor stuff going. Then, you can try to get the speedstep
    thing to work.

    Koen


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  15. Re: How does one control fans?

    Frank said...
    > > > and tell the kernel to use the ondemand governor for frequency scaling:
    > > > # echo "ondemand" > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor

    > >
    > > My problem is that /cpufreq/scaling_governor doesn't appear until after
    > > I do:
    > > # modprobe acpi_cpufreq
    > > Is that correct?

    >
    > I am not sure about that one. I don't have this module loaded (even gives a
    > "busy" error when modprobing it) and still have the /cpufreq/scaling_governor
    > available. But I am on the AMD64 kernel, which might be different from x86.


    Okay, I will have to dig deeper.

    > > > (you will have to do that every time you boot, so add a script to your
    > > > runlevel)

    > >
    > > What? And miss out on all that typing?

    >
    > If you don't compile your own kernel, you are stuck with the options the
    > Debian default kernel uses. This means, it will use the "performance" governor
    > as default governor. So I wrote a small script, which I put into /etc/init.d
    > and link into runlevel 2, to select the "ondemand" governor, e.g.:


    Thanks for sharing this. I'll definitely be using it. At the moment, I
    could simply add
    # modprobe acpi_cpufrq
    at the start of the script for it to work, but I'd like to understand
    what acpi_cpufreq is doing - Koen says it's a " cpufreq processor
    driver", so that's where I'll start.

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  16. Re: How does one control fans?

    Koen Vermeer said...
    > On Thu, 2005-10-13 at 18:52 +0100, marc wrote:
    >
    > > I have a handle on 'governors', including those in the kernel, now.
    > > However, after I modprobe the kernel governors, nothing appears in
    > > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/ until I modprobe acpi_cpufreq.
    > > Is this correct? Is there another way to activate
    > > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq without loading this module and its
    > > 'performance' governor?

    >
    > You need a cpufreq governor, and a cpufreq processor driver.
    > acpi_cpufreq is a cpufreq processor driver, but not the optimal one.
    > Once you've got this loaded, or any other processor driver, then you
    > should be able to load any governor you want.


    You mention that acpi_cpufreq is not optimal, what are the alternatives?

    > > Yes, CONFIG_ACPI_THERMAL is set to m. There are no references to thermal
    > > in the ACPI messages :-( The thermal module is loaded.
    > > # acpi -V says,
    > > No support for device type: thermal
    > > AC adaper: on-line
    > > So, I guess that thermal detection is not possible, unless there is
    > > something else that needs to be done. Clearly, there is thermal
    > > detection in operation, and it seems odd that it is not, apparently,
    > > under the control of ACPI.

    >
    > I think it is most likely under ACPI control, but there just a
    > miscommunication between the OS ACPI stuff and the BIOS ACPI stuff. I
    > don't know how to debug that.


    Possibly to do with the above issue. We'll see.

    > > CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO=m
    > > CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO_ACPI=y
    > > CONFIG_X86_SPEEDSTEP_CENTRINO_TABLE=y

    >
    > The last one isn't required, but I'd say it doesn't hurt either. I'm
    > sorry, I think it should work, so I don't know where to look to debug
    > it. You could stick to the ACPI cpufreq driver for now, just to get the
    > cpufreq governor stuff going. Then, you can try to get the speedstep
    > thing to work.


    Indeed. Googling as I type.

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  17. Re: How does one control fans?

    I guess he means the driver saying which kind of cpu-frequency-scaling to use.
    E. g. I have an AMD Turion processor, so I use powernow_k8. I don't know
    which processor you have and which module corresponds to it.

    > Thanks for sharing this. I'll definitely be using it. At the moment, I
    > could simply add
    > # modprobe acpi_cpufrq
    > at the start of the script for it to work, but I'd like to understand
    > what acpi_cpufreq is doing - Koen says it's a " cpufreq processor
    > driver", so that's where I'll start.



    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  18. Re: How does one control fans?

    Frank said...
    >
    > > Thanks for sharing this. I'll definitely be using it. At the moment, I
    > > could simply add
    > > # modprobe acpi_cpufrq
    > > at the start of the script for it to work, but I'd like to understand
    > > what acpi_cpufreq is doing - Koen says it's a " cpufreq processor
    > > driver", so that's where I'll start.

    >
    > I guess he means the driver saying which kind of cpu-frequency-scaling to use.
    > E. g. I have an AMD Turion processor, so I use powernow_k8. I don't know
    > which processor you have and which module corresponds to it.


    I've now discovered
    /lib/modules//kernel/arch/i386/kernel/cpu/cpufreq
    so I know the options.

    I've tried most in the list - not the ones that are obviously
    inappropriate, at least, obviously inappropriate by their name - and I'm
    trying to discover how to uncover which is the best and why.

    If this is written down anywhere, then I'd love to know.

    FWIW

    mote:~/Desktop# cat /proc/cpuinfo
    processor : 0
    vendor_id : GenuineIntel
    cpu family : 6
    model : 13
    model name : Intel(R) Pentium(R) M processor 1.60GHz
    stepping : 8
    cpu MHz : 798.101
    cache size : 2048 KB
    fdiv_bug : no
    hlt_bug : no
    f00f_bug : no
    coma_bug : no
    fpu : yes
    fpu_exception : yes
    cpuid level : 2
    wp : yes
    flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge
    mca cmovpat clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss tm pbe nx est tm2
    bogomips : 1598.38

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  19. Re: How does one control fans?

    On Fri, 2005-10-14 at 22:17 +0200, Frank wrote:
    > I guess he means the driver saying which kind of cpu-frequency-scaling to use.
    > E. g. I have an AMD Turion processor, so I use powernow_k8. I don't know
    > which processor you have and which module corresponds to it.


    Yes, something like that. The processor driver is the one that knows how
    to do the frequency scaling. The governor tells the processor driver
    what is should do, but it has no knowledge about how to do this.

    Koen


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

  20. Re: How does one control fans?

    Koen Vermeer said...
    > On Fri, 2005-10-14 at 22:17 +0200, Frank wrote:
    > > I guess he means the driver saying which kind of cpu-frequency-scaling to use.
    > > E. g. I have an AMD Turion processor, so I use powernow_k8. I don't know
    > > which processor you have and which module corresponds to it.

    >
    > Yes, something like that. The processor driver is the one that knows how
    > to do the frequency scaling. The governor tells the processor driver
    > what is should do, but it has no knowledge about how to do this.


    I'm going to try them all, one at a time, during boot - surely there
    must be an easier way! I'm also going to try compiling the kernel with
    CONFIG_MPENTIUMM, instead of CONFIG_M686.

    Then it'll be time to sort the modem and the Nvidia card. What larks!

    --
    Best,
    Marc


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast