Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly) - Debian

This is a discussion on Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly) - Debian ; On October 1, 2005 15:51, David R. Litwin wrote: > In the continuing saga to try to get my WiFi to work, I have notived some > thing interesting: iwconfig says that the mode is managed, as does KWiFi > ...

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Thread: Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

  1. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    On October 1, 2005 15:51, David R. Litwin wrote:
    > In the continuing saga to try to get my WiFi to work, I have notived some
    > thing interesting: iwconfig says that the mode is managed, as does KWiFi
    > Manager. But, iwlist (when I do ath0 scan) says that it is master. Could
    > this be what is causing the internet troubles (id est, that most pages take
    > a very long time to load if they do at all. Incidentally, using GTK
    > Gnutella gives me an instant connection.)?


    iwlist scan reports the networks within range. The "Mode: Master" it reports
    refers to the access point's mode of operation. On the other hand, your
    wireless adapter is correctly configured to run in "managed" to be a client
    to the AP.

    >
    > I tired moving to dhcpcd from dhclient; things seem to be slightly worse,
    > if any thing at all.
    >
    > I'm not sure about the DNS situation. Perhaps I'm not looking in the right
    > place to find it.?
    >
    > Thank you kindly, as always.
    >
    > (My appologies if this comes in multiple times: It's a fault of precisely
    > what we're trying to solve!)
    >
    > --
    > —A watched bread-crumb never boils.
    > —My hover-craft is full of eels.
    > —[...]and that's the he and the she of it.


    You should try to systematically rule out possible causes for failure. Try
    bring your nic up manually, and verify that each step was successful. Don't
    use encryption (WEP or WPA) initially just to rule out another potential
    source of trouble.

    1. Get the nic associate with the access point
    Try configuring the wireless settings manually with iwconfig
    iwconfig eth1 enc off
    iwconfig eth1 essid myessid
    iwconfig eth1 channel mychannel
    Now check the state of the card:
    iwconfig eth1
    You should see IEEE 802.11[abg] on the first line, instead of "unassociated".
    See if you can arping your access point
    arping -i eth1

    2. Configure the network device with ifconfig
    ifconfig eth1 192.168.0.10
    See if you can ping your access point
    ping

    3. Now try configuring by dhcp
    dhclient3 eth1
    This should set your DNS server information as well.
    Try pinging your access point again.
    If that works, try pinging a site by name
    ping www.google.ca

    See how far you can get following these steps.

    Luca

  2. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    On October 2, 2005 00:37, David R. Litwin wrote:
    >
    > 1. Get the nic associate with the access point
    >
    > > Try configuring the wireless settings manually with iwconfig
    > > iwconfig eth1 enc off
    > > iwconfig eth1 essid myessid
    > > iwconfig eth1 channel mychannel
    > > Now check the state of the card:
    > > iwconfig eth1
    > > You should see IEEE 802.11[abg] on the first line, instead of
    > > "unassociated".
    > > See if you can arping your access point
    > > arping -i eth1 >

    >
    > All of this works nicely. However, I need to set an IP before I can arping.
    > Elsewise, it says that ath0 is not activated (or some such thing).
    >
    > 2. Configure the network device with ifconfig
    >
    > > ifconfig eth1 192.168.0.10
    > > See if you can ping your access point
    > > ping

    >
    > All of this works nicely. It seems that ping never stops: Is this so, for
    > that is what was happening to me.


    Yes, ping by default never stops. If you just want it to send a few packets
    you can use the -c option.

    > 3. Now try configuring by dhcp
    >
    > > dhclient3 eth1
    > > This should set your DNS server information as well.
    > > Try pinging your access point again.
    > > If that works, try pinging a site by name
    > > ping www.google.ca

    >
    > Again, all went well with this.
    >
    > See how far you can get following these steps.
    >
    >
    > It seems to me that the problem is not with the connection, but rather with
    > the applications. Could this be? What could this problem be? How do I
    > correct it?


    Did you try your applications once you had your connection up? They should
    have worked as well. I suspect the problem is with the configuration you
    have in /etc/network/interfaces. Or maybe the problem was with your WEP
    configuration. Try recreating the configuration you applied in steps 1
    through 3 in /etc/network/interfaces. Something like:

    iface mytest inet dhcp
    wireless-enc off
    wireless-essid myessid
    wireless-channel mychannel

    Then bring ath1 up like this:
    ifdown ath1
    ifup ath1=mytest

    Then test the connection. Try pinging and some other applications. Let me
    know how that works for you.

    >
    > I thank you kindly.


    You're welcome.

    Luca


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  3. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    Sorry, I'm late to the party. Hopefully I won't be too stupid...


    David R. Litwin wrote:

    > ....
    >
    >Did you try your applications once you had your connection up? They should
    >
    >
    >>have worked as well.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >They did not.
    >
    >I suspect the problem is with the configuration you
    >
    >
    >>have in /etc/network/interfaces. Or maybe the problem was with your WEP
    >>configuration. Try recreating the configuration you applied in steps 1
    >>through 3 in /etc/network/interfaces. Something like:
    >>
    >>


    Well, maybe so and maybe not.

    I don't know where he ping'ed (panged?), so I don't know if DNS was
    involved, so
    I'll start assuming as little as possible.

    1 - if 'ping' to a numeric IP address within your local wireless network
    works,
    then you've gotten connected to the local net fine, but you need to make
    sure DNS works:
    2 - if 'ping' to a non-numeric IP address within your local wireless
    network subnet
    works, then you've got DNS working. Now
    3 - if 'ping' to a NON-local IP address (by name OR by number, having
    established
    that DNS works) works, then you're 99% of the way home.
    4 - NOW that we have established that IP networking is working right,
    THEN try
    your applications.

    if 1 fails, then you may have route problems, or you may not actually be
    connected
    to the (wireless) network.

    if 2 fails (but 1 works) then you need a DNS server - check
    /etc/resolv.conf (or wherever
    it is these days).

    if 3 fails (but 1 and 2 works) then you almost certainly have a routing
    issue - you need
    a default route to the gateway. USUALLY you get this (and DNS server,
    by the way)
    from your DHCP server.

    The claim is that 1 (and maybe 2 and MAYBE even 3) works, but 4 doesn't.
    If 1,2,3 work and 4 doesn't then we need to know more about the topology
    and applications. Maybe :-)

    Now, as I say, I'm late to the party, so I could be less than helpful.
    However,
    for OTHER people working on networking (not even just wireless!), the above
    might prove helpful so I thought I'd throw it out. All the above
    happens once
    you get the wireless card to notice packets flying around (that's the
    first 90%,
    the above is the other 90% ;-)

    rc


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  4. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    Rusty Carruth wrote:

    > Sorry, I'm late to the party. Hopefully I won't be too stupid...



    Yeah, and I'm tired and its late, so I forgot step 0! Sorry, here it is,
    along with the rest so its a complete story:

    > ...



    -1 - if 'netstat' shows a (wireless) device with a valid IP address, you
    theoretically have
    neworking up.
    0 - ping that Ip address, if it answers then indeed the hardware drivers
    are acting
    like they think your networking is working.

    > 1 - if 'ping' to a numeric IP address within your local wireless
    > network works,
    > then you've gotten connected to the local net fine, but you need to
    > make
    > sure DNS works:
    > 2 - if 'ping' to a non-numeric IP address within your local wireless
    > network subnet
    > works, then you've got DNS working. Now
    > 3 - if 'ping' to a NON-local IP address (by name OR by number, having
    > established
    > that DNS works) works, then you're 99% of the way home.
    > 4 - NOW that we have established that IP networking is working right,
    > THEN try
    > your applications.
    >

    if '-1' fails, your networking isn't, you need to make the hardware work
    AND get
    all that nifty wireless infrastructure stuff going. (essid, all that)

    if 0 fails, you are in a similar boat, just farther down the stream :-)

    > if 1 fails, then you may have route problems, or you may not actually
    > be connected
    > to the (wireless) network.
    >
    > if 2 fails (but 1 works) then you need a DNS server - check
    > /etc/resolv.conf (or wherever
    > it is these days).
    >
    > if 3 fails (but 1 and 2 works) then you almost certainly have a
    > routing issue - you need
    > a default route to the gateway. USUALLY you get this (and DNS server,
    > by the way)
    > from your DHCP server.



    rc


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  5. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    David, you have yet to properly describe your problem.

    > Now, cat /etc/resolv.conf gives this at College:
    >
    > search dawsoncollege.qc.ca
    > nameserver 198.168.48.4
    >
    > And this when at Home:
    >
    > search no-domain-set.bellcanada
    > nameserver 192.168.2.1
    >

    OK, the search statements mean nothing. It's bogus, but all that does is
    append a domain name if you try to use an unqualified host name. IF you
    have more than one machine on your home network, you might actually want
    that to say something else, otherwise it doesn't matter.

    What is 192.168.2.1? This is what people have been talking about, re: you
    running your own DNS. According to your system, this is the only DNS
    server it talks to. It's not one of Bell's servers, which are most likely:

    dns1.sympatico.ca. 1800 IN A 204.101.251.1
    dns2.sympatico.ca. 1800 IN A 204.101.251.2
    ns5.bellnexxia.net. 3600 IN A 209.226.175.236
    ns6.bellnexxia.net. 3600 IN A 209.226.175.237

    192.168.2.1 _looks_ like a cable or wireless router. If it was your DSL
    modem, you would be working, so it isn't. :-)

    David R. Litwin wrote:

    > Here is what can be changed; what I think may be the problem.
    >
    >
    > *Home Networking modem IP Network*IP Address:IP Netmaskefault Gateway:
    > or Use WANHost Name: DHCP Server:EnableDisableStart IP Range: End IP
    > Range: Default Gateway: or SelfDNS: or Use WANDomain Name:Lease Time
    > (mins): Requires a specified DNS or Infinite time
    > I hope every one can see that. If not, I'll type it out.


    I did get that in HTML form, but once is enough :-)

    What on earth is it? Did you forget to mention the little detail that this
    is how you're configuring your wireless router, or do you not even _have_ a
    wireless router?

    I don't see anything in this long thread that even suggests you've tried to
    make this connection through the ethernet connection on your wireless
    router, which should be the first thing you try.

    Before we try anything else tell us:

    A) Make & Model of your DSL modem
    B) Make & Model of your Wireless router
    C) How does B connect to A (if they're not a single unit)
    D) What happens when you plug into your DSL modem
    E) What happens when you plug into your wireless router (if A & B aren't a
    single unit)

    --
    derek


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  6. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    On Thu, 2005-10-06 at 10:04 -0400, David R. Litwin wrote:
    > I certainly hope that this can clear up some of the confusion. It is
    > rather diff cult to describe all of this with out being able to show
    > you precisely what the whole shebang looks like. My apologies if it is
    > still incomprehensible: I encourage questions which can clarify!


    I have only read the discussion and didn't participate in it, yet. It is
    rather difficult to get an idea of your setup. However, there is one
    thing that I'd like to mention. In one of your mails, you talked about
    pppoeconf, which is what you 'normally use to connect to the internet'.
    What do you need that for? You say that you use DSL, 'which seems to do
    every thing automatically'. If that is so, then you should only need to
    set up a network connection to the DSL modem.

    >From what I read, you have a combined DSL modem/router/wireless AP.

    Normally, the modem takes care of the connection with your ISP. So, if
    the modem is configured correctly, all you need to do is get your own
    network working.

    Koen


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  7. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    David R. Litwin wrote:

    > I have but the "central computer" (the one to which the router is
    > connected) and the laptop.


    OK, and your directly connected computer is working? Is it running Linux or
    Windows? If it's working, we know that DHCP is working properly on the DSL
    router, and it's correct that it should appear as the DNS IP.

    > 192.168.2.1 is the "Router IP Address". This is from
    > the advanced page from http://mynetwork, some thing the Bell installation
    > C. D. created.


    OK, so that's the _internal_ address of the router.

    > an Ethernet Cable directly to the Router / Modem. This worked with
    > normalcy (id est, every thing was coming in at the normal speed).
    >
    > Before we try anything else tell us:
    >>
    >> A) Make & Model of your DSL modem

    >
    > Siemens SpeedStream 6525 Router / Modem. This is not some thing one can
    > buy; it came as a gift from Sympatico.


    You're not kidding. Siemens seems to have closed it's whole home networking
    line. Are you sure of that model number? Are you sure it's wireless?
    (Sorry, but one has to ask!)

    Plug the system you're having trouble with into the router with an ethernet
    cable, make sure you have a connection. Then do:

    route
    cat /etc/resolv.conf
    cat /var/lib/dhcp*/*.leases

    (for dhclient3 it's actually /var/lib/dhcp3/dhclient.leases, but it depends
    which client you're using - that should get most of them).

    Then try to connect wirelessly and do the same. Compare the results. They
    should be exactly the same except for the metric & iface columns in the
    "route" output, the actual IP issued in the lease, and the interface the
    lease is for.

    If you don't get an IP at all wirelessly, then try: "dhclient ath0" (or
    whatever the wireless iface is) and report back.
    --
    derek


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  8. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    David R. Litwin wrote:

    > Plug the system you're having trouble with into the router with an
    > ethernet
    >> cable, make sure you have a connection. Then do:
    >>
    >> route

    >
    >
    > Kernel IP routing table
    > Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface
    > 64.230.197.65 *
    > 255.255.255.255UH 0 0 0 ppp0
    > default 64.230.197.65 0.0.0.0 UG 0
    > 0 0 ppp0


    ppp0? Must be pppoe. That's a bit of a clue. Too bad I don't know
    anything about pppoe. Surely you configured it yourself, though, at some
    point.

    > cat /etc/resolv.conf
    >
    >
    > nameserver 206.47.244.12
    > nameserver 207.47.244.12
    > search no-domain-set.bellcanada


    So your wired connection is _not_ using the wireless router's DNS.
    >
    > cat /var/lib/dhcp*/*.leases

    ....

    None of those look good - nothing like the wired session. In fact, not even
    a lease for the wired session.

    > Compare the results. They
    >> should be exactly the same except for the metric & iface columns in the
    >> "route" output, the actual IP issued in the lease, and the interface the
    >> lease is for.
    >>
    >> If you don't get an IP at all wirelessly, then try: "dhclient ath0" (or
    >> whatever the wireless iface is) and report back.

    >
    >
    > I started to use dhclient ath0. It seems to work, I don't know what else I
    > can do, so I do that.


    Seems to work? You mean you get an internet connection?
    --
    derek


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  9. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    David R. Litwin wrote:

    > Ahh! Stupid Internet deleted my E-Mail! Now, I have to do it again.
    > Please, I really need this fixed: It's friving me mad.
    >
    >
    >> ppp0? Must be pppoe. That's a bit of a clue. Too bad I don't know
    >> anything about pppoe. Surely you configured it yourself, though, at some
    >> point.

    >
    > Yes, I do use pppoeconf to connect to the internet when using a wire. I
    > assume you are talking about the wired connection now, yes?


    Yes, but I don't see how you need pppoe on the wired connection and not the
    wireless.
    >
    >> nameserver 206.47.244.12
    >> > nameserver 207.47.244.12
    >> > search no-domain-set.bellcanada

    >>
    >> So your wired connection is _not_ using the wireless router's DNS.

    >
    > I shasll be honest: I would not know.


    No, I'm telling you. :-)
    >>
    >> > cat /var/lib/dhcp*/*.leases

    >> ...
    >>
    >> None of those look good - nothing like the wired session. In fact, not
    >> even
    >> a lease for the wired session.

    >
    > Again, if you believe that there are significant differences, how do I fix
    > them?


    The thing is, I don't believe you need to...

    >> > I started to use dhclient ath0. It seems to work, I don't know what
    >> > else I
    >> > can do, so I do that.

    >>
    >> Seems to work? You mean you get an internet connection?

    >
    > Certainly I have an internet connection, which "works".


    Then what's your problem? All along you've been telling us you couldn't
    access the Internet. If you can, it's a simple matter of automating the
    method you're using. In this case, probably just uncommenting the wlan0
    lines in /etc/network/interfaces and changing wlan0 to ath0.
    >
    > Here is my theory. I think that the problem is in the search
    > no-domain-set.bellcanada being on top when connecting with the wireless.


    No, it has nothing to do with anything. All the search domain does (I
    already explained this) is add ".no-domain-set.bellcanada" to the end of
    any DNS query your system makes to an unqualified domain (e.g., "foo" as
    opposed to "foo.bar"). Which means that, in all the cases you showed, it
    does nothing useful (queries to unqualified domains would time out in half
    the time, though, if you didn't have it at all).
    --
    derek


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  10. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    David R. Litwin wrote:

    >> Certainly I have an internet connection, which "works".
    >>
    >> Then what's your problem? All along you've been telling us you couldn't
    >> access the Internet. If you can, it's a simple matter of automating the
    >> method you're using. In this case, probably just uncommenting the wlan0
    >> lines in /etc/network/interfaces and changing wlan0 to ath0.

    >
    >
    > If you have been interpreting what I say to mean I have no connection at
    > all, I appologise. I know that I have stated quite clearly that the
    > problem is a page will load (if at all)


    "if at all" is an indication of not working. Your very first post said the
    same. The question is whether it works (ie, _reliably_) when you use
    "dhclient ath0", which you've twice implied it does. Stop going off on
    tangents and just answer the questions!

    >> Here is my theory. I think that the problem is in the search
    >> > no-domain-set.bellcanada being on top when connecting with the
    >> > wireless.

    >>
    >> No, it has nothing to do with anything. All the search domain does (I
    >> already explained this) is add ".no-domain-set.bellcanada" to the end of
    >> any DNS query your system makes to an unqualified domain (e.g., "foo" as
    >> opposed to "foo.bar"). Which means that, in all the cases you showed, it
    >> does nothing useful (queries to unqualified domains would time out in
    >> half the time, though, if you didn't have it at all).

    >
    > Hence my theory. Since, when looking at the resolv.conf file it has the
    > search bit first, I believe that it is adding this
    > no-domain-set.bellcanadato the end of all queries and only if that
    > doesn't work will it remove it.


    I give up. DNS doesn't work that way. SO REMOVE IT. I promise you it will
    make NO difference, but it's obviously the only thing you'll trust. It
    will get changed back next time you configure an interface, but it'll stay
    however you set it long enough to prove it makes no difference.

    > The nameserver should be listed first in a working connection (well, with


    Just RTFM!
    --
    derek


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  11. Re: WiFi Problems (It doesn't work properly)

    David R. Litwin:
    >
    > ake-kpkg --append-to-version "-1-686-smp" --revision
    > 2.6.12-1-686-smp--config old configure
    > I note that you are using the --revision flag with the value
    > 2.6.12-1-686-smp.
    > However, the ./debian/changelog file exists, and has a different value
    > 2.6.12-1-686.
    > I am confused by this discrepancy, and am halting.
    >
    > It would seem to me that the smp is the problem.


    No. You just have to do a 'make-kpkg clean' before giving a new string
    to '--append-to-version'. This won't erase your kernel config, BTW.

    J.
    --
    I throw away plastics and think about the discoveries of future
    archeologists.
    [Agree] [Disagree]


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