Re: gnome CPU scaling monitor - Debian

This is a discussion on Re: gnome CPU scaling monitor - Debian ; You need to set cpufreq-selector as suid root. To do that run (as root): chown root:root /usr/bin/cpufreq-selector chmod +s /usr/bin/cpufreq-selector. Then retart gnome-cpufreq-applet. Note, though, that this can be a security risk because anyone who runs it runs it as ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Re: gnome CPU scaling monitor

  1. Re: gnome CPU scaling monitor

    You need to set cpufreq-selector as suid root. To do that run (as
    root):
    chown root:root /usr/bin/cpufreq-selector
    chmod +s /usr/bin/cpufreq-selector.

    Then retart gnome-cpufreq-applet.
    Note, though, that this can be a security risk because anyone who runs
    it runs it as root and can change your cpu frequency easily, and any
    bugs will do more damage (I run it with the suid bit set and have no
    problems, just warning you though.)

    MJD

    On 8/22/05, Alejandro Bonilla Beeche
    wrote:
    Hi,

    I have Debian Sid with gnome 2.10 and basically cannot
    change the speed
    of the CPU as a user, the CPU Freq monitor always allows to
    change the
    CPU speed, but as root.

    Anyone has given a user the permissions to change this
    from the user
    and not with root?

    .Alejandro


    --
    To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-laptop-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact
    listmaster@lists.debian.org



    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.2.5 (GNU/Linux)

    iD8DBQBDExeKSQKUZCJCKloRAvovAJ0Q5fwKeU1hsl0eFP3r3x NOeru7WACg8SkG
    3h7aX9SBnfLxlz+Xjj7b7j8=
    =RHVb
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


  2. Re: gnome CPU scaling monitor

    Matthew wrote:

    > You need to set cpufreq-selector as suid root. To do that run (as
    > root):
    > chown root:root /usr/bin/cpufreq-selector
    > chmod +s /usr/bin/cpufreq-selector.


    Or if the applet lets you customize the command, change it
    to go through sudo(8). Also give yourself the necessary
    permissions by editing /etc/sudoers.

    There is a sudo guide at
    http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/sudo-guide.xml


    --
    pa at panix dot com

+ Reply to Thread