Re: Debian modules - Debian

This is a discussion on Re: Debian modules - Debian ; Jim Popovitch: > I've installed Debian Sarge on a few *servers*, and I see that the > default kernel loads many more modules than I need (snd_*, floppy, > vesafb, etc.) Is there a way to prevent Sarge from loading ...

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Thread: Re: Debian modules

  1. Re: Debian modules

    Jim Popovitch:
    > I've installed Debian Sarge on a few *servers*, and I see that the
    > default kernel loads many more modules than I need (snd_*, floppy,
    > vesafb, etc.) Is there a way to prevent Sarge from loading a bunch of
    > crap automatically?


    IIRC, assuming 2.4 kernels you just turn off the modules you don't want
    by aliasing them to off in modules.conf. 2.4 wasn't so bad about
    loading modules at boot, it waited until you tried to use a device.

    2.6 and udev in Etch was harder for me. I wanted to disable some
    modules from loading and it took me a while (and fruitless googling) to
    figure out that discover was loading them and how to tell it not to. I
    mention it here in hopes it's easier to find for the next guy.

    I hope that answers your question well enough.

    Dave


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  2. Re: RESOLVED: Debian modules

    Hi all,

    I just wanted to follow-up and say that I resolved my modules issue
    based on info from this URL:
    http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/409

    Essentially, the proper way in Debian to prevent modules from being
    loaded is to create a custom file in /etc/modprobe.d/ that gets loaded
    before the aliases file in that directory. Use a file named aa* or one
    that begins with any number. This way Debian will honor the first entry
    for said module (enable or disable).

    hth,

    -Jim P.

    David L. Anselmi wrote:
    > Jim Popovitch:
    >> I've installed Debian Sarge on a few *servers*, and I see that the
    >> default kernel loads many more modules than I need (snd_*, floppy,
    >> vesafb, etc.) Is there a way to prevent Sarge from loading a bunch of
    >> crap automatically?

    >
    > IIRC, assuming 2.4 kernels you just turn off the modules you don't want
    > by aliasing them to off in modules.conf. 2.4 wasn't so bad about
    > loading modules at boot, it waited until you tried to use a device.
    >
    > 2.6 and udev in Etch was harder for me. I wanted to disable some
    > modules from loading and it took me a while (and fruitless googling) to
    > figure out that discover was loading them and how to tell it not to. I
    > mention it here in hopes it's easier to find for the next guy.
    >
    > I hope that answers your question well enough.
    >
    > Dave
    >
    >



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  3. Re: Debian modules

    On 29/06/06, David L. Anselmi wrote:
    > Jim Popovitch:
    > > I've installed Debian Sarge on a few *servers*, and I see that the
    > > default kernel loads many more modules than I need (snd_*, floppy,
    > > vesafb, etc.) Is there a way to prevent Sarge from loading a bunch of
    > > crap automatically?

    >
    > IIRC, assuming 2.4 kernels you just turn off the modules you don't want
    > by aliasing them to off in modules.conf. 2.4 wasn't so bad about
    > loading modules at boot, it waited until you tried to use a device.
    >
    > 2.6 and udev in Etch was harder for me. I wanted to disable some
    > modules from loading and it took me a while (and fruitless googling) to
    > figure out that discover was loading them and how to tell it not to. I
    > mention it here in hopes it's easier to find for the next guy.
    >
    > I hope that answers your question well enough.
    >
    > Dave
    >
    >
    > --
    > To UNSUBSCRIBE, email to debian-isp-REQUEST@lists.debian.org
    > with a subject of "unsubscribe". Trouble? Contact listmaster@lists.debian.org
    >
    >


    I am also having these exact same frustrations at the moment. Why does
    the stupid thing have to load so many modules and why is it not easier
    and more transparent to just have it load only the modules you want?
    It should be a case of commenting out the lines in /etc/modules.conf
    but I already have practically nothing in there and I still get 20+
    modules loaded at boot with the stock 2.4 kernel.I find that Debian is
    great when you stick to what it gives you but as soon as you try to do
    any real customisation, it becomes much less transparent and much more
    time consuming. Take the kernel and the initramfs etc if you actually
    want to have something compiled in instead of in a module so it loads
    properly at boot time...

    I think I'm going to abandon debian's kernel altogether and go back to
    custom kernels etc. One thing I notice though is that you can get a
    lot of errors at boot about not being able to load various modules.

    I'm absolutely loath to go to ubuntu but debian is really showing it's
    age and is seriously lagging behind by today's standards. I just can't
    bear the thought going over to ubuntu since it's founder pretty much
    bought his way into the distro tables...

    I wish debian would pull it's socks up and join the modern world....

    Perhaps I've just been spoilt by the leaner and cleaner gentoo...

    -h


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  4. Re: Debian modules

    Hari Sekhon wrote:
    > I am also having these exact same frustrations at the moment. Why does
    > the stupid thing have to load so many modules and why is it not easier
    > and more transparent to just have it load only the modules you want?


    It's because /etc/mkinitrd/mkinitrd.conf SAYs so. :-) That config file
    contains "MODULES=most" which tells mkinird to include most modules when
    it builds an initrd image after installing a new kernel. This is stupid
    in my opinion because you wind up with a sloppy system. If you change
    that setting to "MODULES=dep" and rebuild initrd with mkinitrd
    (including a reboot, arrgh) then you will have less modules.

    I do agree with you, learning this and putting up with it is very
    frustrating from a *SERVER* admin standpoint. Given Ubuntu's rise in
    fame, Debian should just throw in the "desktop" towel and focus on a
    stable server platform.

    -Jim P.


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  5. Re: Debian modules

    Hari Sekhon wrote:

    > I think I'm going to abandon debian's kernel altogether and go back to
    > custom kernels


    I installed the debian 2.6.8 kernel to get the 2.6 dependencies, and
    then used make-kpkg (from kernel-package) to build a custom 2.6.16
    kernel. Having a .deb kernel package is much better than trying to
    install a raw custom kernel.


    > debian is really showing it's age


    Age == wisdom.


    > and is seriously lagging behind by today's standards.


    Using make-kpkg required some learning, but once I understood how to use
    it effectively, I appreciated the wisdom of debian. You can do most
    anything you want with debian, if you are willing to invest the time in
    learning how to do it.


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  6. Re: Debian modules

    Hari Sekhon wrote:

    >
    > I think I'm going to abandon debian's kernel altogether and go back to
    > custom kernels etc. One thing I notice though is that you can get a
    > lot of errors at boot about not being able to load various modules.
    >
    > I'm absolutely loath to go to ubuntu but debian is really showing it's
    > age and is seriously lagging behind by today's standards. I just can't
    > bear the thought going over to ubuntu since it's founder pretty much
    > bought his way into the distro tables...
    >
    > I wish debian would pull it's socks up and join the modern world....
    >
    > Perhaps I've just been spoilt by the leaner and cleaner gentoo...
    >



    http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/re...-kernel-debian

    I can't understand why anyone still uses 2.4 today.

    As for debian lagging behind - ?! Use SID if you want up to date - sarge
    if you want stable....

    And if you need a new version of some packages, look at backports...

    http://www.backports.org/

    Regards

    Andrew


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