Flac to wav - Debian

This is a discussion on Flac to wav - Debian ; Debian Etch Gnome Hi all, I found K3b a burning program which is working Ok after installing a decent cdrecord file. Under K3b there is an option to transform a Flac file into a wav file, that seems to work ...

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Thread: Flac to wav

  1. Flac to wav

    Debian Etch Gnome

    Hi all,

    I found K3b a burning program which is working
    Ok after installing a decent cdrecord file.
    Under K3b there is an option to transform a
    Flac file into a wav file, that seems to work
    fine too, getting a nice triumph sound at the end.
    OK now I like to know where this new created
    ..wav file is gone to.
    I never was very successful using commands like
    "find" or "locate", the gnome search tool doesn't
    me much either.
    How do I find this wav file on my computer?
    Are there any other tools for fast copying
    or ripping a track of an audio CD, lossless that is.

    What I do want is burning a CD with both MP3 converted
    to wav and Flac converted to wav for double blind tests.

    BTW under my former OS BeOS I could simply browse
    an audio CD and copy any track to my computer
    in a flash, is this somehow possible under
    Linux too?

    Edmund







  2. Re: Flac to wav

    Horton heard a Who named Edmund saying:
    > Debian Etch Gnome
    >
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I found K3b a burning program which is working
    > Ok after installing a decent cdrecord file.
    > Under K3b there is an option to transform a
    > Flac file into a wav file, that seems to work
    > fine too, getting a nice triumph sound at the end.
    > OK now I like to know where this new created
    > .wav file is gone to.
    > I never was very successful using commands like
    > "find" or "locate", the gnome search tool doesn't
    > me much either.
    > How do I find this wav file on my computer?


    Do in a terminal find -name '*.wav' -print

    > Are there any other tools for fast copying
    > or ripping a track of an audio CD, lossless that is.



    ogg is as good or better than wav and has a *much* smaller file size than wav. I
    like soundconverter. My MP3 player requires MP3 so I convert ogg to
    MP3 with soundconverter.

    --
    sk8r-365
    The only way to make Windows "secure":
    1) go to http://goodbye-microsoft.com
    2) replace existing operating system.

  3. Re: Flac to wav

    sk8r-365 wrote:

    > Horton heard a Who named Edmund saying:
    >> Debian Etch Gnome
    >>
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> I found K3b a burning program which is working
    >> Ok after installing a decent cdrecord file.
    >> Under K3b there is an option to transform a
    >> Flac file into a wav file, that seems to work
    >> fine too, getting a nice triumph sound at the end.
    >> OK now I like to know where this new created
    >> .wav file is gone to.
    >> I never was very successful using commands like
    >> "find" or "locate", the gnome search tool doesn't
    >> me much either.
    >> How do I find this wav file on my computer?

    >
    > Do in a terminal find -name '*.wav' -print


    Great I found it.
    Don't know what happened but locate does
    the job too!? Maybe I need a new pair of
    glasses.
    >
    >> Are there any other tools for fast copying
    >> or ripping a track of an audio CD, lossless that is.

    >
    >
    > ogg is as good or better than wav and has a *much* smaller file size than
    > wav. I like soundconverter. My MP3 player requires MP3 so I convert ogg to
    > MP3 with soundconverter.


    I just read about ogg, ogg is a lossy reduction
    system ( I do call reduction, reduction and compression,
    compression ).
    I spent a fortune on my audio system to be able to
    hear as much as possible. Really don't want to throw
    away music right from the source.

    BTW it is never intended to use an lossy reduction
    system like MP3 in succession In mean you should
    not reduce an MP3 file (or ogg ) again with MP3.
    You get a much better result reduce it only once
    in the format you play it.
    Try it! Take a CD reduce it to ogg then reduce
    this ogg file again to MP3 listen.
    Now take a CD a reduce it to MP3 compare those
    and tell us about it.

    Edmund




  4. Re: Flac to wav

    Edmund wrote:

    > Great I found it.
    > Don't know what happened but locate does
    > the job too!? Maybe I need a new pair of
    > glasses.


    Or just read the documentation of the programs
    you use.

    From the locate(1) manpage:

    NAME
    locate - list files in databases that match a pattern

    SYNOPSIS
    locate [-d path |--database=path] [-e | -E | --[non-]existing]
    [-i | --ignore-case] [-0 | --null] [-c | --count]
    [-w | --wholename] |-b | --basename] [-l N | --limit=N]
    [-S | --statistics] [-r | --regex ] [-P | -H | --nofollow]
    [-L | --follow] [--version] [-A | --all] [-p | --print] [--help]
    pattern...

    DESCRIPTION
    This manual page documents the GNU version of locate. For each
    given pattern, locate searches one or more databases of file
    names and displays the file names that contain the pattern.


    To speed up the searches "locate" doesn't read the disk contents
    but pre-composed databases containing the names of all files and
    directories. Changes on the file system will not be seen by "locate"
    until the next update of the databases. See also the updatedb(1)
    manpage.
    On debian etch "updatedb" will be started once a day from:
    /etc/cron.daily/find.

    Regards,

    Kees.

    --
    Kees Theunissen.

  5. Re: Flac to wav

    Kees Theunissen wrote:

    > Edmund wrote:
    >
    >> Great I found it.
    >> Don't know what happened but locate does
    >> the job too!? Maybe I need a new pair of
    >> glasses.

    >
    > Or just read the documentation of the programs
    > you use.
    >


    > Kees.


    I get it, thanks :-)

    Edmund
    >



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