Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions - Debian

This is a discussion on Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions - Debian ; I demand that Ronnie may or may not have written... [snip] > During the first install, I had the machine disconnected from an external > IP stream, and the install script complained that it couldn't check the > security updates, ...

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Thread: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

  1. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    I demand that Ronnie may or may not have written...

    [snip]
    > During the first install, I had the machine disconnected from an external
    > IP stream, and the install script complained that it couldn't check the
    > security updates, and had commented out some entries in the apt - sources -
    > list. I haven't addressed that yet,


    Uncomment the entries for security.debian.org, make sure that they match your
    other ftp.*.debian.org entries (wrt main, contrib, non-free), then one of
    "apt-get update && apt-get upgrade", "aptitude update && aptitude upgrade" or
    your preferred GUI method.

    (I prefer aptitude for its UI, though console-based, and its tracking of
    automatically-installed packages. Though, to be fair, apt-get in
    testing/unstable has the latter now, though not (yet?) the ability to mark
    packages as automatically or manually installed.)

    > nor have I tackled bring my other discs online with /etc/fstab.


    If they're IDE and using the old IDE drivers, this should be trivial BUT if
    you're using distribution-compiled kernels, you probably should be using
    labels or UUIDs rather than device names (mainly in case of unexpected device
    naming changes).

    [snip]
    > When I do take up the security updates, do you know whether that security
    > service embraces more than just the linux core (whatever that might mean),
    > maybe updating Gnome, KDE, Iceweasel, and Open Office as well?


    Security fixes for everything that's in the release (and contrib and
    non-free).

    [snip]
    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    | Let's keep the pound sterling

    I'd like to, but I'm uncomfortable when I'm alone or with others.

  2. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 01:44:56 +0100, Darren Salt wrote:

    > I demand that Ronnie may or may not have written...




    Is this opening statement on all your posts supposed to be "witty", or
    what? What purpose does it serve? It doesn't even make sense, really, in
    English. You "demand" that someone said something? Doesn't make sense.
    Why do you do it?


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".


  3. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    [edit]

    Harold, don't miss the point that there is some fault in your wiring to
    get the symptoms you describe. Mentioned by two of us here.

    Rodney


  4. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions


    [edit]
    > When I do take up the security updates, do you know whether that
    > security service embraces more than just the linux core (whatever that
    > might mean), maybe updating Gnome, KDE, Iceweasel, and Open Office as
    > well?
    >
    >

    Yup, any necessary security upgrades will be done for any package in the
    repositories and they are always done quickly after a vulnerability is
    discovered. (note the term, upgrade. - in Debian people will mean
    something else by update, it refers to downloading the latest package
    lists for your package manager to use)


    Ronnie, as you can see, when traffic becomes large enough, the threads
    take on a life of their own and sometimes even lose sight of the topic.
    Wars over which foo is *best* happen, and can become even less than
    helpful for a newbie. Some posters don't even read all of a topic or even
    a thread before posting and only reply to the last post in a thread, even
    if that confuses the person who asked for help. Don't let that discourage
    you. Take a hint to wait a while before following any advice, mine
    included, I make as many mistakes as any normal person. We've got nothing
    to prove here, except to try and help you. I've seen people follow
    extremely bad advice blindly and end up with a mess that had nothing to do
    with the problem about which they came for help. Take the advice, do your
    own research until you understand what the code that is presented to you
    will do and then try it. As long as your Windows partition isn't mounted
    and you don't re-partition or format anything on hda, your
    mission-critical production environment will be preserved while you are in
    Debian, unless/until someone figures out how to make the machine melt down
    from the command line or with a GUI. Even then, you'd just buy a new
    machine and restore from your backup.



    > I mentioned this was a production system - hda is, anyway (another
    > reason why I've not enabled it yet - and actually it's a nice feature to
    > be able to leave it offline). Some of the data on it is subject to NDA,
    > so I'm fairly paranoid about security anyway. (That was a background
    > motive for looking more deeply at linux.) The machine is behind another
    > already protected network, but I think I will still face risks of
    > hostile web pages, and rogue attachments - which is why I was wondering
    > about the upgrade process for the applications.
    >


    Yup, I groked that from context. After you learn enough and are
    comfortable with Debian you will probably want to look into encryption for
    your system, that way if the laptop that you will ultimately use it on
    falls into the wrong hands it won't be easy to compromise the data. The
    upgrades in the repository are signed by Debian developers and thus as
    safe as possible.

    >>Hummm. Perhaps I should also mention this. If that is in fact the
    >>fastest download you can sustain maybe you have an extremely noisy line
    >>or some other problem. Even out in the country on a long run from a
    >>central office with multiple A/D conversions you should be able to get
    >>at least twice that throughput.

    >
    > You'd have thought, wouldn't you. Well, it's an archipelago, and it
    > isn't metal. It's radio. It's analogue radio, and it's susceptible to
    > military and civil marine radars, and some adjacent channel
    > broadcasting, from a transmitter right on the Yagi line of sight, though
    > very distant. And there's multipath problems at 6.25 hour intervals
    > because certain tide heights re-inforce the reflections. And it isn't so
    > much an A/D conversion problem, but a series of 2w/4w conversions which
    > play havoc with echo, and with phase for the trellis coding (do they
    > still call it that?) of the higher baud values.
    >


    Interesting, I live on an island too. And, I do understand the packet
    radio limitations. My first Internet connect here was an analogue cell
    phone attached to a modem which would give about 1200-2400 with lots of
    noise and drop-outs. In those days I just did email and surfing with no
    pictures, however that was previous to the days when every site was filled
    with flash.

    [edit]

    > Thank you, Rodney, for some very helpful posts throughout the

    thread - I
    > was a bit shocked when it didn't just 'work' quite as I expected, and
    > your response to that was very helpful. I'm much obliged.
    >


    Debian, at this point in history with Etch release installer, mostly does
    "just work", however, not exactly like the various live CD's that are in
    circulation and you are not the first to run into that wall. Security
    first, then let the sys admin open up what they chose, Many distros with
    live CD's feel a need to concentrate on ease of use for users.

    You are very welcome, it's refreshing to try and help someone who is also
    trying hard to help himself. All any of us have to do is point you in
    the right direction.

    Rodney

  5. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    I demand that Prostetnic Vogon Dan C of the Galactic Hyperspace Planning
    Council may or may not have written...

    > On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 01:44:56 +0100, Darren Salt wrote:
    >> I demand that Ronnie may or may not have written...


    >


    > Is this opening statement on all your posts supposed to be "witty", or
    > what? What purpose does it serve? It doesn't even make sense, really, in
    > English. You "demand" that someone said something? Doesn't make sense.
    > Why do you do it?


    42! ... no, didn't work...

    --
    | Ford Prefect | linux or ds at | Orbiting | Have towel,
    | Guide Reporter | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Jaglan Beta | will travel
    | + If this isn't enough of a clue, don't ask Marvin.

    "I demand that demarcation may or may not be the problem!"

  6. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    [edit]

    Ronnie,
    Something I forgot to mention, it might be a good idea to start a new
    topic with your next specific question, many helpful people won't drill
    down into long threads looking for a new question, they don't have the
    time and/or the inclination, yet may have a wealth of knowledge and
    experience. Long threads, have a tendency to go off topic a bit or just
    become social phenomena.

    Rodney


  7. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 14:23:41 +0100, Darren Salt wrote:

    > 42! ... no, didn't work...


    "Goodbye, and thanks for all the fish." :-)



  8. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    In Rodney:

    [Snip...]

    > Harold, don't miss the point that there is some fault in your wiring


    Understood, but it's not my wiring--it's an apartment I've lived in years
    now without any other problems (electrical overload/shorts/fires, etc.).

    So the motivation for a landlord to fix it (for values near it==noise) is
    minimal.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    Kids jumping ship? Looking to hire an old-school type? Email me.

  9. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    I demand that Rodney may or may not have written...

    > On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 14:23:41 +0100, Darren Salt wrote:
    >> 42! ... no, didn't work...


    > "Goodbye, and thanks for all the fish." :-)


    s/Goodbye/So long/ ;-)

    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    | + Generate power using sun, wind, water, nuclear. FORGET COAL AND OIL.

    It's not so much how we stand as the direction in which we're moving.

  10. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 14:21:44 +0000, Harold Stevens wrote:

    > In Rodney:
    >
    > [Snip...]
    >
    >> Harold, don't miss the point that there is some fault in your wiring

    >
    > Understood, but it's not my wiring--it's an apartment I've lived in
    > years now without any other problems (electrical overload/shorts/fires,
    > etc.).
    >
    > So the motivation for a landlord to fix it (for values near it==noise)
    > is minimal.


    Okay, but you might be able to filter out those spikes with a good quality
    battery back up unit or line conditioner of some kind. However it might be
    some kind of ground fault which the landloard should want to fix, possible
    wiring code violations.

    No matter, if you've lived with it that long, it obviously is not a
    problem for you and you were able to add to our discussion by assuring
    Ronnie that, even with a poor dialup connection, it's possible to keep up
    with security upgrades. That's the so called bottom line.

    Nice chating with you.
    Rodney

  11. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    In Rodney:

    [Snip....]

    > filter out those spikes with a good quality battery back up unit or line
    > conditioner of some kind.


    It's an internal USR 5610B (now available as the USR 5610C upgrade) sitting
    in a Compaq Deskpro powered by a Belkin 900VA (F6C900-UNV) UPS. This Belkin
    seems well filtered, and proven very reliable during power outages, as well
    as adequately moderating typical consumer powerline noise (AFAICT).

    IMO, I've pretty much done what's reasonable in terms of power quality with
    the PC/modem. Obviously, the stove's beyond my level of expertise.

    > some kind of ground fault which the landloard should want to fix, possible
    > wiring code violations


    The Belkin UPS claims to monitor for ground faults from gitgo, and it (plus
    other power sources) don't seem to find obvious ground faults (AFAICT). The
    stove may have a ground fault problem, but as you mention it seems not some
    hazard creating genuine emergencies, over several years now (AFAIK).

    > even with a poor dialup connection, it's possible to keep up with security
    > upgrades. That's the so called bottom line


    Exactly--I know it's not the case in this thread, but sometimes I hear some
    folks try to avoid responsible net security with the dialup excuse. That is
    just completely irresponsible--again, I know that's not the issue here.

    > Nice chating with you.


    Thanks for taking the time to comment and offer suggestions for everyone.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    Kids jumping ship? Looking to hire an old-school type? Email me.

  12. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    Harold Stevens writes:
    > The stove may have a ground fault problem, but as you mention it seems
    > not some hazard creating genuine emergencies, over several years now
    > (AFAIK).


    It could be the stove itself but the problem is more likely in the building
    wiring.
    --
    John Hasler

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