Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions - Debian

This is a discussion on Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions - Debian ; In responce to Mumia W. 's post. I thought everyone should know: > On 07/18/2007 04:23 PM, Ronnie wrote: >> On 18 Jul 2007 22:45:51 +0200, msm wrote: >> >>> But reinstalling just for an extra desktop environment is also ...

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Thread: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

  1. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    In responce to Mumia W. 's post. I thought everyone should know:

    > On 07/18/2007 04:23 PM, Ronnie wrote:
    >> On 18 Jul 2007 22:45:51 +0200, msm wrote:
    >>
    >>> But reinstalling just for an extra desktop environment is also
    >>> overkill.

    >> Oh. Can I run KDE 'and' Gnome, then? And somehow select them or
    >> switch between them. Gosh, I hadn't realised that.
    >>
    >> I'm on dial up. I'll have to find out, if I've understood this idea
    >> correctly, whether I can get the KDE stuff of the KDE install CD, or
    >> whether the only way is over a 19200 phone line. More reading!
    >>
    >> Thanks for the hint.
    >>

    >
    > You can install KDE through aptitude or synaptic or apt-get.
    >
    > There's no need to use the CD's any more. If you set up your
    > /etc/apt/sources.list properly, you can let aptitude install KDE by
    > downloading it from a Debian software repository.
    >
    > Refer to this page:
    > http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/reference/
    >
    > Much information you'll need while using Debian is there.
    >
    > Also install some documentation packages: doc-debian and
    > debian-reference-en:
    >
    > aptitude install doc-debian debian-reference-en
    >
    > The files should show up in /usr/share/doc/debian and
    > /usr/share/doc/Debian/reference/.
    >
    > You've probably already seen the Debian Installation Guide which is on
    > the CD-ROM.
    >
    > After you have an installation of Debian going, it's very unlikely
    > you'll ever need the Debian installation disks ever again. This is not
    > Windows. You don't have to put the CD in the drive whenever you change
    > printer drivers, and there is no product activation :-)


    he said he's on dial up did he not? isnt the KDE package ruther large? why
    not edit the sources.list to read from a cd then pop the cd in while the
    system is up and running and still use apt-get to get the desired packages
    from the cd. assuming he has the kde install cd in hand i would think that
    would be faster than trying to download the package via dial up
    connection, unless of course i am wrong about the size of the package for
    the KDE desktop environment.

    --
    Chris

  2. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions


    >>I'm not sure what you mean by "it asks you to log in", are you using GDM
    >>as a desktop manager or logging in from a terminal prompt? Did you end up
    >>in Gnome?

    >
    > Yes, Gnome comes up with a login window - it's the first interaction
    > opportunity I get with the machine once I select Debian 4 from my Grub
    > list
    >


    That sounds like the GDM (gnome desktop manager) from it you choose the
    desktop environment or window manager you want for the session and login.
    (Note: that is not the only way it could be done) In your case, it
    probably only has the choice of Gnome since you haven't installed anything
    else yet.

    >
    >>How (method) did you try to mount those other partitions?

    >
    > Gnome has a 'places' menu which you can open - it lists all the discs and
    > partitions, and if you rightclick on them it lets you choose mount. Or
    > you can doubleclick. I get a failure message with an option for more
    > detail which offers:
    >
    > libhal-storage.c 1401 : info: called libhal_free_dbus_error but dbuserror
    > was not set.
    > process 2716: applications must not close shared connections - see
    > dbus_connection_close() docs. this is a bug in the application. error:
    > device /dev/hdb2 is not removable error: could not execute pmount
    >


    And, if you think about it, it's telling you the truth. Hdb2 is not
    removeable media, is it?

    If you were to make a mount point in /mnt (for example /hdb2) and, as
    root, enter "mount /dev/hdb2 /mnt/hdb2" in a terminal, then you would
    be able to see the contents of hdb2 at /mnt/hdb2.


    >
    >> What does your /etc/fstab file look like?

    >
    > (it exceeds wrap, I think):
    > #
    > proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    > /dev/hdb4 / ext2 defaults,errors=remount-ro 0 1
    > /dev/hdb3 none swap sw 0 0 /dev/hdc
    > /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0 /dev/fd0
    > /media/floppy0 auto rw,user,noauto 0 0
    >


    Yup, looks like a default install to hdb4 with swap on hdb3.

    This would be a good time to open a terminal and type "man fstab"
    without the quotes. After that you will want to "man mount". Then you can
    RTFM to your heart's content.:-)


    > (on a subsequent reboot fsck fixed some errors on hdb4 caused when I
    > could not find a way to logout and shutdown - after hitting the problem,
    > though.


    In a default install Debian can only be shutdown by root (the system
    admin). If you think about it, it makes sense. The system admin does not
    want the server shut down by a regular user.

    There usually isn't any compelling reason to shut a Debian system down. In
    fact many people like to point out their "uptime", how long they've gone
    without a reboot.

    If you open a terminal and type:

    $su
    $Password:
    #shutdown -h now

    Then your system will do an orderly shutdown and halt.


    > Same mount failures continue to occur.)


    Just to be correct, they weren't failures, it behaved as was to be
    expected, you just aren't accustomed to it.


    Mumia W gave you some references, here are a couple more and there
    are lots more out there on the net.
    http://www.aboutdebian.com/
    http://newbiedoc.berlios.de/wiki/Main_Page

    Rodney

  3. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions



    [Kees T]>>How about just adding the partitions you want to access?
    [Ronnie]> That straightforward?
    >


    Yes, it is that straightforward, once you know how. I remember it was
    very confusing for me when I started, you know the correct approach and
    I expect you will read up on it. It definitely ain't like winders. ;-)

    I'm guessing that you're expecting Debian to behave like one of those Live
    CD you've used until now. You never mentioned which ones. Some of them do
    things like add all your other partitions to fstab and make them available
    for the user automagically. Debian doesn't do that, the system admin (in
    this case you) has to setup the Debian system the way the system admin
    wants it to be and may not want users to be able to access all the
    partitions on a system.


    [Kees T]>>On the other hand -as a beginner- you might want to learn by
    playing and
    >>experimenting with your system, screwing things up and reinstalling a
    >>few times anyway. :-)

    [Ronnie]> Now that's true, but this is a production machine which is why
    I'm on
    > hdb. So I need to keep my enthusiasm on a leash.
    >


    My advice is what others have already stated, don't re-install your
    working system, just add KDE to the install.

  4. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    It occurred to me that I'd better explain and mention that the $ and # are
    parts of the prompt not part of the command. The $ is user prompt, after
    you have entered su and entered the correct password, the prompt will
    change to #, indicating that you are now working as root (super user). Be
    sure to close the terminal window when done, you don't want a root
    terminal open except when you need to do some admin task, you especially
    don't want it open if someone compromises your username, because then they
    could do anything root can do.

    > If you open a

    terminal and type:
    >
    > $su
    > $Password:
    > #shutdown -h now
    >
    > Then your system will do an orderly shutdown and halt.


    Someone will probably jump in here with sudo stuff, I suggest you leave
    that until you become comfortable with how things work and then we can
    discuss the security implications and why some live distros choose to
    include the user in sudo. I'd guess you already have enough on your plate
    at the moment.

  5. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    I demand that Rodney may or may not have written...

    [snip]
    > If you open a terminal and type:


    > $su
    > $Password:
    > #shutdown -h now


    I'd use
    $ su - -c 'shutdown -h now'

    or arrange for the power button to do that (via ACPI), ideally starting with
    an orderly logout from any active desktop environment.

    [snip]
    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    | + Buy local produce. Try to walk or cycle. TRANSPORT CAUSES GLOBAL WARMING.

    ASCII stupid question... get a stupid ANSI!

  6. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 14:47:16 +0100, Darren Salt wrote:

    > I demand that Rodney may or may not have written...
    >
    > [snip]
    >> If you open a terminal and type:

    >
    >> $su
    >> $Password:
    >> #shutdown -h now

    >
    > I'd use
    > $ su - -c 'shutdown -h now'
    >
    > or arrange for the power button to do that (via ACPI), ideally starting
    > with an orderly logout from any active desktop environment.
    >
    > [snip]



    Yes, of course Darren. It would also be possible to allow a user or users
    to shutdown. However, Ronnie is very new to this and has lots of stuff to
    learn at the present time. It would be easiest for him if you give a
    detailed step-by-step (ideally with explanation of the steps) of how to
    accomplish this on a default install. Please don't just tell him to RTFM.
    He's working hard to learn but only has experience with live CD's that
    have been set up by others. I hesitate to add to his stress by throwing a
    bunch of choices or personal preferences at him all at one time. YMMV.

    Rodney


  7. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On 2007-07-18, Mumia W. rambled on thusly:

    > On 07/18/2007 04:23 PM, Ronnie wrote:


    >> I'm on dial up. I'll have to find out, if I've understood this idea
    >> correctly, whether I can get the KDE stuff of the KDE install CD, or
    >> whether the only way is over a 19200 phone line. More reading!


    > You can install KDE through aptitude or synaptic or apt-get.


    > There's no need to use the CD's any more. If you set up your
    > /etc/apt/sources.list properly, you can let aptitude install KDE by
    > downloading it from a Debian software repository.


    So you ignored the bit about Ronnie not wanting to download everything over
    his 19.2k phone line, eh?

    --
    Michael Fierro (aka Biffster) biffster@NOSPAM-REALLYgmail.com
    http://apt-get.us Y!: miguelito_fierro AIM: mfierro1
    -==-
    "Because if you knew, you'd be teaching me. And for a student
    to teach a teacher is presumptuous and rude."
    - Professor Turpentine, "Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory"

  8. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On 2007-07-18, Ronnie rambled on thusly:

    > Oh. Can I run KDE 'and' Gnome, then? And somehow select them or
    > switch between them. Gosh, I hadn't realised that.


    Yeah. KDE and Gnome are not seperate operating systems, they are only
    different desktop environments. You can install all three major desktop
    environments (KDE, Gnome and XFCE) on the same computer, and then pick
    which session you want to run when you log in. The "Session" menu on the
    login screen will list all desktop environments and window managers, and
    you can choose which to run.

    I have the big three, plus Windowmaker and fluxbox installed on my main
    Ubuntu workstation. XFCE is my default, and it is what I use 90% of the
    time. 9% of the time, I use Windowmaker. And every now and then, I get
    goofy and run either KDE or fluxbox. I'm not a Gnome kinda guy, but I am
    not offended enough by it to uninstall it.

    --
    Michael Fierro (aka Biffster) biffster@NOSPAM-REALLYgmail.com
    http://apt-get.us Y!: miguelito_fierro AIM: mfierro1
    -==-
    I selected E5 ... but I didn't hear "Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs"!

  9. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 09:48:35 -0500, Biffster wrote:

    > On 2007-07-18, Ronnie rambled on thusly:
    >
    >> Oh. Can I run KDE 'and' Gnome, then? And somehow select them or switch
    >> between them. Gosh, I hadn't realised that.

    >
    > Yeah. KDE and Gnome are not seperate operating systems, they are only
    > different desktop environments. You can install all three major desktop
    > environments (KDE, Gnome and XFCE) on the same computer, and then pick
    > which session you want to run when you log in. The "Session" menu on the
    > login screen will list all desktop environments and window managers, and
    > you can choose which to run.
    >
    > I have the big three, plus Windowmaker and fluxbox installed on my main
    > Ubuntu workstation. XFCE is my default, and it is what I use 90% of the
    > time. 9% of the time, I use Windowmaker. And every now and then, I get
    > goofy and run either KDE or fluxbox. I'm not a Gnome kinda guy, but I am
    > not offended enough by it to uninstall it.



    Oh! You missed IceWM, my personal favorite. ;-)



  10. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On 2007-07-19, Rodney rambled on thusly:

    > Oh! You missed IceWM, my personal favorite. ;-)


    I tried IceWM once, decided that I liked fluxbox more, then never went
    back. I am SO a first impression kinda guy.

    --
    Michael Fierro (aka Biffster) biffster@NOSPAM-REALLYgmail.com
    http://apt-get.us Y!: miguelito_fierro AIM: mfierro1

  11. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On 07/19/2007 09:45 AM, Biffster wrote:
    > On 2007-07-18, Mumia W. rambled on thusly:
    >
    >> On 07/18/2007 04:23 PM, Ronnie wrote:

    >
    >>> I'm on dial up. I'll have to find out, if I've understood this idea
    >>> correctly, whether I can get the KDE stuff of the KDE install CD, or
    >>> whether the only way is over a 19200 phone line. More reading!

    >
    >> You can install KDE through aptitude or synaptic or apt-get.

    >
    >> There's no need to use the CD's any more. If you set up your
    >> /etc/apt/sources.list properly, you can let aptitude install KDE by
    >> downloading it from a Debian software repository.

    >
    > So you ignored the bit about Ronnie not wanting to download everything over
    > his 19.2k phone line, eh?
    >


    No, not quite. Downloading a 630MB CD-ROM is one thing. Downloading 60MB
    in KDE packages is another. And most people configure their sources.list
    to reference both their CD-ROMs and the Debian repositories.

    I should have made it more explicit that that was an option, but I did
    point him to the documentation.



  12. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 12:25:46 -0500, Biffster wrote:

    > On 2007-07-19, Rodney rambled on thusly:
    >
    >> Oh! You missed IceWM, my personal favorite. ;-)

    >
    > I tried IceWM once, decided that I liked fluxbox more, then never went
    > back. I am SO a first impression kinda guy.


    Well, I do have fluxbox on one installation and it is small memory
    use, fast and has the elegance of simplicity. Especially good for older,
    slower systems without a lot of RAM. The slit is pretty handy but I never
    got into the tabs the way some people seem to love them. IceWM is a bit
    more trouble to configure, maybe that's what appeals to me.




  13. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 21:23:46 +0000, Ronnie wrote:


    > I'm on dial up. I'll have to find out, if I've understood this idea
    > correctly, whether I can get the KDE stuff of the KDE install CD, or
    > whether the only way is over a 19200 phone line. More reading!
    >
    >


    Hummm. Perhaps I should also mention this. If that is in fact the fastest
    download you can sustain maybe you have an extremely noisy line or some
    other problem. Even out in the country on a long run from a central office
    with multiple A/D conversions you should be able to get at least twice
    that throughput. You will need to be able to download security upgrades
    and such. The world doesn't need any more unpatched systems attached to
    the Internet.

    Rodney

  14. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    In Rodney:

    [Snip...]

    > you should be able to get at least twice that throughput


    I'm on dialup too, in a suburb in a major metro area (DFW TX US), and it
    varies significantly. Even crazy stuff like my electric stove cycling on
    and off can induce lockup spikes on my modem (a sharp "zap" sound if I'm
    on the phone talking) which requires redialing.

    Even beyond that, I regularly see transfer rates going from as little as
    a few hundred bytes/sec to maybe 3 or 4 thousand bytes/sec (binary files
    like distro updates and such). All within one dialup session, from a few
    minutes to an hour or more.

    Ergo, I refuse (or outright can't do) Flash and indeed most other online
    "multimedia" (IMO) junk.

    Still, I find dialup perfectly adequate for my needs. JMO; MMV...

    > You will need to be able to download security upgrades and such


    Thank $DEITY Linux doesn't have to do too much kernel updating. For SuSE
    with YaST Online Updates, those can be as much as 20+ MB. Under the best
    of circumstances, that's several minutes downloading, at least.

    Most other SuSE updates are much less, and take only a few minutes.

    IMO, dialup bandwidth isn't a problem in terms of security updates.

    > world doesn't need any more unpatched systems attached to the Internet


    I agree completely. I have a very dim view of those who go online with a
    known exploitable install (Linux, *BSD, M$, whatever). Especially anyone
    who picks up EOL Linux distros at a garage sale, and doesn't at the very
    least disable any services they don't absolutely need to offer.

    And I certainly don't think "slow" dialups are any excuse for not taking
    *all* ongoing net security/sanitation seriously.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    Kids jumping ship? Looking to hire an old-school type? Email me.

  15. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 12:10:29 +0000, Harold Stevens wrote:

    [edit]

    > I'm on dialup too, in a suburb in a major metro area (DFW TX US), and it
    > varies significantly. Even crazy stuff like my electric stove cycling on
    > and off can induce lockup spikes on my modem (a sharp "zap" sound if I'm
    > on the phone talking) which requires redialing.
    >


    Yes, of course dialup line conditions do jump around. And, good modems
    adjusting (falling forward or falling back), due to varying line
    conditions, will have considerable variation during the time of a large
    download. I've done considerable testing on throughput and have found
    that, if you find a good estimate of the fastest speed your line/modem
    combination is capable of on a regular basis (various times of day,
    downloading from several different sites), and set a ceiling speed with AT
    commands during modem initialisation at that speed or maybe one step
    above, one can get the most stable throughput at the best speed overall. I
    noted that the first speed negotiated with a new connection was usually
    higher than it was going to be able to sustain.

    If you're getting those lockup spikes transmitted through the line then it
    sounds like you have some bad filtering somewhere. A high quality surge
    protector might help.

    But you are correct, in a city there is a lot of variation, even other
    calls sometimes splatter over. If one happens to live very close to a
    central office with only true copper wire (no multiplexers, etc) between
    the CO and modem, then one can usually get much closer to the modem's
    theoretical speed.


    > Still, I find dialup perfectly adequate for my needs. JMO; MMV...
    >


    I agree, I live in a rural area with no broadband available other than
    sat. and I can't afford that. Dialup works for me too. ;-) I just love
    programs that can resume downloads. Sometimes I download all through
    the night, sometimes I visit friends with broadband.

    [edit]
    >
    > IMO, dialup bandwidth isn't a problem in terms of security updates.
    >


    I agree. However, did you happen to install Etch from early release CD's,
    then have to upgrade? I have no idea if the debs on Ronnie's CD's are
    current to what is in the repository.


    But the bottom line is that I would not expect Ronnie to have a tel line
    that is consistantly only able to produce 19.2 unless there is a problem
    with it. That's why I started this thread, so that Ronnie can think about
    that. I expect he'll be back with questions after he's digested all the
    current advice. Perhaps we can help with this too.


  16. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    Harold Stevens wrote:
    > I'm on dialup too, in a suburb in a major metro area (DFW TX US), and it
    > varies significantly. Even crazy stuff like my electric stove cycling on
    > and off can induce lockup spikes on my modem (a sharp "zap" sound if I'm
    > on the phone talking) which requires redialing.


    There is something seriously wrong with your wiring.
    --
    John Hasler

  17. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    In Rodney:

    [Snip...]

    > I agree. However, did you happen to install Etch from early release CD's,
    > then have to upgrade? I have no idea if the debs on Ronnie's CD's are
    > current to what is in the repository.


    Ooops, I forgot we're talking Debian (not SuSE). Sorry, can't speak about
    Debian-specific downloading, because I haven't done it myself.

    What I do about the my online download problem is install the most recent
    (SuSE) from CDs/DVD as soon after official release as possible, then keep
    it updated online (basically) on a daily basis. Even then, a kernel patch
    is not going to be a cakewalk timewise. However, most routine updates are
    usually quite reasonable IMO (via SuSE's YOU, done daily, as need be).

    OP might want to rethink what version of Debian and the media involved in
    its distribution, if dialup is the sole *connectivity* resource.

    BTW, I'm planning on migrating from SuSE to *ubuntu or *BSD, and so I was
    following the Debian group (here) for tips that might help in *ubuntu.

    > Perhaps we can help with this too


    I agree; I don't know the Debian specifics, but there must be a way for a
    Debian install to do routine *updates* (not whole-hog installs) over most
    dialup links around today, without too much unpaid overtime.

    --
    Regards, Weird (Harold Stevens) * IMPORTANT EMAIL INFO FOLLOWS *
    Pardon any bogus email addresses (wookie) in place for spambots.
    Really, it's (wyrd) at airmail, dotted with net. DO NOT SPAM IT.
    Kids jumping ship? Looking to hire an old-school type? Email me.

  18. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On 07/21/2007 01:01 PM, Harold Stevens wrote:
    > [...]
    > I don't know the Debian specifics, but there must be a way for a
    > Debian install to do routine *updates* (not whole-hog installs) over most
    > dialup links around today, without too much unpaid overtime.
    >


    Yes, that's one of the things that "aptitude" does.


  19. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Sat, 21 Jul 2007 01:18:46 -0700, Rodney wrote:


    >[re-ordered]


    >You will need to be able to download security upgrades
    >and such. The world doesn't need any more unpatched systems attached to
    >the Internet.


    Too true, couldn't agree more. During the first install, I had the
    machine disconnected from an external IP stream, and the install
    script complained that it couldn't check the security updates, and had
    commented out some entries in the apt - sources - list. I haven't
    addressed that yet, nor have I tackled bring my other discs online
    with /etc/fstab. I was happy for the time being just getting used to
    basic Debian. And I've been tied up on the day job, too.

    When I do take up the security updates, do you know whether that
    security service embraces more than just the linux core (whatever that
    might mean), maybe updating Gnome, KDE, Iceweasel, and Open Office as
    well?

    I mentioned this was a production system - hda is, anyway (another
    reason why I've not enabled it yet - and actually it's a nice feature
    to be able to leave it offline). Some of the data on it is subject to
    NDA, so I'm fairly paranoid about security anyway. (That was a
    background motive for looking more deeply at linux.) The machine is
    behind another already protected network, but I think I will still
    face risks of hostile web pages, and rogue attachments - which is why
    I was wondering about the upgrade process for the applications.

    >Hummm. Perhaps I should also mention this. If that is in fact the fastest
    >download you can sustain maybe you have an extremely noisy line or some
    >other problem. Even out in the country on a long run from a central office
    >with multiple A/D conversions you should be able to get at least twice
    >that throughput.


    You'd have thought, wouldn't you. Well, it's an archipelago, and it
    isn't metal. It's radio. It's analogue radio, and it's susceptible
    to military and civil marine radars, and some adjacent channel
    broadcasting, from a transmitter right on the Yagi line of sight,
    though very distant. And there's multipath problems at 6.25 hour
    intervals because certain tide heights re-inforce the reflections.
    And it isn't so much an A/D conversion problem, but a series of 2w/4w
    conversions which play havoc with echo, and with phase for the trellis
    coding (do they still call it that?) of the higher baud values.

    The telco is thinking of moving to digital, though the marine radar
    issue is not going to go away - many other countries' vessels transit
    the island group, and it is difficult to enforce switching off of high
    power radars - sailors will forget even if there was no other agenda.

    They've done trials with this unit:

    http://www.4rf.com/solutions/aprisaxe.html

    direct off two different manufacturers' exchanges. This in the HQ
    test labs - and they achieved between 19.2k and 24k. They think it's
    because of the 2w/4w conversions - they believe the noise floor over
    the digital radio is very low - should be, it should be G712. But
    these higher speed modems seem not to tolerate either the phase
    shifts, or the group delay distortion from having two independent
    sections each introducing G712's worth of impairment.

    So, yes, there is something wrong, yes the telco is looking at it, but
    a replacement is likely to be around the same level - unless they
    change the architecure and take PCM all the way to the customer
    cluster - to the 'kerb' in a sense, though it's actually a radio hut.

    Thank you, Rodney, for some very helpful posts throughout the thread -
    I was a bit shocked when it didn't just 'work' quite as I expected,
    and your response to that was very helpful. I'm much obliged.


    ______________
    regards,
    Ron

  20. Re: Newbie: Debian install to existing partitions

    On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 22:53:44 GMT, "Mumia W."
    wrote:

    >
    >You can install KDE through aptitude or synaptic or apt-get.
    >
    >There's no need to use the CD's any more. If you set up your
    >/etc/apt/sources.list properly, you can let aptitude install KDE by
    >downloading it from a Debian software repository.


    And it worked well. I actually introduced my KDE install CD, and CD #
    2 which also had bits of KDE on it, and used something named synaptic
    package manager - which seemed to load KDE ok. I got really bold
    then, and tried open office, which faile dfirst time - updating
    something, I couldn't see what - then tried again because it offered a
    'repair' option, and everything went well. Now running KDE, Gnome,
    and Open Office. Genuinely, I am really happy at that. I haven't
    looked to see what is on discs 3 - 5 - I've only the ISOs for those so
    far, so I haven't made the CDs yet.

    Good advice - getting used to the idea of seeing everything as an
    add-on instead of as an integral part - thank you.

    >
    >Refer to this page:
    >http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/reference/
    >
    >Much information you'll need while using Debian is there.
    >
    >Also install some documentation packages: doc-debian and
    >debian-reference-en:
    >
    >aptitude install doc-debian debian-reference-en
    >
    >The files should show up in /usr/share/doc/debian and
    >/usr/share/doc/Debian/reference/.
    >
    >You've probably already seen the Debian Installation Guide which is on
    >the CD-ROM.
    >

    I have been looking at the docs, and thank you for setting out the
    file paths, that was useful. I've also been keeping an eye on the
    Debian forum.

    >After you have an installation of Debian going, it's very unlikely
    >you'll ever need the Debian installation disks ever again. This is not
    >Windows. You don't have to put the CD in the drive whenever you change
    >printer drivers, and there is no product activation :-)


    I liked that! Although there was in fact a fair amount of CD swapping
    required for KDE and OOo on top of Gnome. Prseumably once the
    system's exhausted what it wants from CD # 1 that'll stop anyway.

    Thanks again - the hint that KDE wouldn't need a re-install got me
    going.

    ______________
    regards,
    Ron

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