New options for a fresh install... - Debian

This is a discussion on New options for a fresh install... - Debian ; Okay... So I'm thinking of changing architectures from i686 to amd64. What I'm wondering, is what else I should change. Presently, I'm running Debian/Sid with an ext3 file system. I'll have 1GB of RAM, and a pair of 80GB hard ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: New options for a fresh install...

  1. New options for a fresh install...

    Okay... So I'm thinking of changing architectures from i686 to amd64.
    What I'm wondering, is what else I should change.

    Presently, I'm running Debian/Sid with an ext3 file system. I'll have
    1GB of RAM, and a pair of 80GB hard drives, and I do occasionally use
    Windoze (the new machine comes with Vista) for a few games.

    My old little brain has been quite happy these past four or five years
    with my old little computer having its old little partitions and its
    (not quite so) old little ext3... So I'm asking for help again,
    with figuring out where to go from here...

    More specifically, then, what I'm wondering is whether I should change
    partition types, whether reiser4 is better (and safe) to use, or
    whether there's something newer that's more suitable, little bits and
    pieces like that that are really helpful todecide on at install time.

    All in all, I've been rather out of the loop on the more recent file
    system developments, also. I've watched and listened, and have a basic
    understanding of what's going on, but all this LVM and RAID has kind of
    passed me by in any practical sense, and while stuff I've found in
    google and read in articles is full of specifics, it's lacking in any
    real feel for the pros and cons. (Much like with 64 vs 32, google will
    tell me it's possible, and google will tell it there have been
    problems, but google isn't very good at telling me if it's right for me)

    So thanks, I'm not the only one facing these questions, as most
    processors available seem to be heading into multi-core, and drives are
    getting bigger and bigger, and what-not.


    Fredderic

  2. Re: New options for a fresh install...

    Government satellites recorded Fredderic saying:

    >
    > More specifically, then, what I'm wondering is whether I should change
    > partition types, whether reiser4 is better (and safe) to use, or
    > whether there's something newer that's more suitable, little bits and
    > pieces like that that are really helpful todecide on at install time.



    Here's how the Debian folks put the reiserfs question - I thought it
    good advise:

    Securing Debian Manual
    Chapter 3 - Before and during the installation

    3.2.1.1 Selecting the appropriate file systems

    During the system partitioning you also have to decide which file system
    you want to use. The default file system selected in the Debian installation
    for Linux partitions is ext2. However, it is recommended you switch to a
    journalling file system, such as ext3, reiserfs, jfs or xfs, to minimize
    the problems derived from a system crash in the following cases:

    * for laptops in all the file systems installed. That way if you run
    out of battery unexpectedly or the system freezes due to a hardware
    issue (such as X configuration which is somewhat common) you will be
    less likely to lose data during a hardware reboot.

    * for production systems which store large amounts of data (like mail
    servers, ftp servers, network file systems...) it is recommended on
    these partitions. That way, in the event of a system crash, the server
    will take less time to recover and check the file systems, and data
    loss will be less likely.

    Leaving aside the performance issues regarding journalling file systems
    (since this can sometimes turn into a religious war), it is usually better
    to use the ext3 file system. The reason for this is that it is backwards
    compatible with ext2, so if there are any issues with the journalling you
    can disable it and still have a working file system. Also, if you need to
    recover the system with a bootdisk (or CD-ROM) you do not need a custom
    kernel. If the kernel is 2.4 or 2.6 ext3 support is already available, if
    it is a 2.2 kernel you will be able to boot the file system even if you
    lose journalling capabilities. If you are using other journalling file
    systems you will find that you might not be able to recover unless you
    have a 2.4 or 2.6 kernel with the needed modules built-in. If you are
    stuck with a 2.2 kernel on the rescue disk, it might be even more
    difficult to have it access reiserfs or xfs.
    --
    sk8r-365

    http://goodbye-microsoft.com/

  3. Re: New options for a fresh install...

    Fredderic writes:
    >Okay... So I'm thinking of changing architectures from i686 to amd64.
    >What I'm wondering, is what else I should change.
    >
    >Presently, I'm running Debian/Sid with an ext3 file system. I'll have
    >1GB of RAM, and a pair of 80GB hard drives, and I do occasionally use
    >Windoze (the new machine comes with Vista) for a few games.
    >
    >My old little brain has been quite happy these past four or five years
    >with my old little computer having its old little partitions and its
    >(not quite so) old little ext3... So I'm asking for help again,
    >with figuring out where to go from here...
    >
    >More specifically, then, what I'm wondering is whether I should change
    >partition types, whether reiser4 is better (and safe) to use,


    If you are happy with Ext3, stay with it (unless you want to explore
    new territory).

    >I've watched and listened, and have a basic
    >understanding of what's going on, but all this LVM and RAID


    With your hardware, you might consider putting the valuable data in a
    RAID1 (mirroring between partitions on different disks). This costs
    disk space, however.

    The way you do it is not very straightforward in the Debian installer.
    From memory: You create the partitions, make them into Raid
    partitions, then select creating a RAID, and select which of the RAID
    partitions go into which md (RAID) device, then select which md device
    is formatted with which file system.

    - anton
    --
    M. Anton Ertl Some things have to be seen to be believed
    anton@mips.complang.tuwien.ac.at Most things have to be believed to be seen
    http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/home.html

  4. Re: New options for a fresh install...

    On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 13:47:40 +1000, Fredderic wrote:

    > Okay... So I'm thinking of changing architectures from i686 to amd64.
    > What I'm wondering, is what else I should change.
    >
    > Presently, I'm running Debian/Sid with an ext3 file system. I'll have 1GB
    > of RAM, and a pair of 80GB hard drives, and I do occasionally use Windoze
    > (the new machine comes with Vista) for a few games.
    >
    > My old little brain has been quite happy these past four or five years
    > with my old little computer having its old little partitions and its (not
    > quite so) old little ext3... So I'm asking for help again, with figuring
    > out where to go from here...
    >
    > More specifically, then, what I'm wondering is whether I should change
    > partition types, whether reiser4 is better (and safe) to use, or whether
    > there's something newer that's more suitable, little bits and pieces like
    > that that are really helpful todecide on at install time.
    >
    > All in all, I've been rather out of the loop on the more recent file
    > system developments, also. I've watched and listened, and have a basic
    > understanding of what's going on, but all this LVM and RAID has kind of
    > passed me by in any practical sense, and while stuff I've found in google
    > and read in articles is full of specifics, it's lacking in any real feel
    > for the pros and cons. (Much like with 64 vs 32, google will tell me it's
    > possible, and google will tell it there have been problems, but google
    > isn't very good at telling me if it's right for me)
    >
    > So thanks, I'm not the only one facing these questions, as most processors
    > available seem to be heading into multi-core, and drives are getting
    > bigger and bigger, and what-not.
    >
    >
    > Fredderic


    And, along with Google, people here will not be very good at telling you
    what's right for *you*. At least, not unless you give a lot more
    information and even then one would have to guess some about your personal
    style, there's always more than one way to do things and what works for
    some may not be the most comfortable way for others. I wonder what an old
    little computer, with a hard drive having its old little partitions,
    translates into and what it is used for.

    Since you're using sid, I'm a bit surprised at your questions. However an
    extremely brief answer might be. LVM could make those two 80G act like one
    160G; RAID could help protect the intregity of your data. Either
    *might* be useful to you or neither might be very useful. You're already
    using a journalling fs and I think that is a good idea. Another question
    comes to mind, how do you backup?

    One caution about reiser, the author has been charged with murder and that
    could possibly influence further development. I admit, I have reiserfs on
    the system I'm currently typing from.

    I agree with sk8r-365, much about this whole subject could turn into
    a religious war.

    Rodney


  5. Re: New options for a fresh install...

    On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 03:22:10 -0700,
    Rodney wrote:

    > On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 13:47:40 +1000, Fredderic wrote:
    > > My old little brain has been quite happy these past four or five
    > > years with my old little computer having its old little partitions
    > > and its (not quite so) old little ext3... So I'm asking for help
    > > again, with figuring out where to go from here...

    > And, along with Google, people here will not be very good at telling
    > you what's right for *you*.


    Actually, sometimes it takes a combination of the two. My forays into
    Google to answer these questions, resulted in little more than
    information overload. Prior to these responses, I couldn't make my
    mind up one way or another, but the responses I've had in this
    newsgroup have allowed me to prune the tree of knowledge back a bit,
    you could say...


    > Since you're using sid, I'm a bit surprised at your questions.
    > However an extremely brief answer might be. LVM could make those two
    > 80G act like one 160G; RAID could help protect the intregity of your
    > data. Either *might* be useful to you or neither might be very
    > useful. You're already using a journalling fs and I think that is a
    > good idea.


    My last system upgrade was about '04-ish, and that involved mostly
    sticking my old hard drive into the new box, and fiddling a few kernel
    settings. Back then, I was actually keeping up with what was new.
    Since then there hasn't seemed much point, until now.


    > Another question comes to mind, how do you backup?


    Minimally... I have a simple script that makes a list of all the files
    on my system, excluding any that are found in a packages file list,
    then shoves the first 600MB or so on a CD along with an updated index,
    and fills up the remaining space with some of the least recently backed
    up files which helps to keep the CD's turning over.


    > One caution about reiser, the author has been charged with murder and
    > that could possibly influence further development. I admit, I have
    > reiserfs on the system I'm currently typing from. I agree with
    > sk8r-365, much about this whole subject could turn into a religious
    > war.


    Which is probably why I couldn't find many useful comparisons.


    Fredderic

+ Reply to Thread