New AMD64 install - Debian

This is a discussion on New AMD64 install - Debian ; OK, I've downloaded CD#1 for KDE on AMD64 and I'm getting up the nerve to install over my present Gentoo system. Actually, I won't lose Gentoo, I've added two new SATA disks and will go with a RAID1-LVM install. My ...

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Thread: New AMD64 install

  1. New AMD64 install

    OK, I've downloaded CD#1 for KDE on AMD64 and I'm getting up the nerve
    to install over my present Gentoo system. Actually, I won't lose
    Gentoo, I've added two new SATA disks and will go with a RAID1-LVM install.

    My question is how to set up the disks. I've heard that you can't put
    the root partition on LVM, yet I've also seen instructions that have you
    do just that! (I know you can't BOOT from LVM, so I will have a
    separate raid1 partition on each disk for /boot, which will look like a
    normal non-raid partition to grub or lilo).

    So what is the truth here, can I just have raid partitions one for /boot
    and one for the lvm group that will have "/", "/home", and "swap" OR
    do I really need a plain raid partition for "/" outside of LVM?

  2. Re: New AMD64 install

    On Apr 28, 5:24 pm, ken scharf wrote:
    > OK, I've downloaded CD#1 for KDE on AMD64 and I'm getting up the nerve
    > to install over my present Gentoo system. Actually, I won't lose
    > Gentoo, I've added two new SATA disks and will go with a RAID1-LVM install.
    >
    > My question is how to set up the disks. I've heard that you can't put
    > the root partition on LVM, yet I've also seen instructions that have you
    > do just that! (I know you can't BOOT from LVM, so I will have a
    > separate raid1 partition on each disk for /boot, which will look like a
    > normal non-raid partition to grub or lilo).
    >
    > So what is the truth here, can I just have raid partitions one for /boot
    > and one for the lvm group that will have "/", "/home", and "swap" OR
    > do I really need a plain raid partition for "/" outside of LVM?


    I guess that you can have the disc set up you asked for, with only a
    "plain" /boot-parition (have not tried that yet, but I will when I
    get my hands on a new installation, and not just upgrading ;-)). But
    it is easy to check out. Make a small test installation to get Debian
    started. If it doues work, start a full installation (or just
    continue with "aptitude install kde kdm"). If not, restart with
    another disc layout.
    But as I wrote, it should work with just a plain /boot-partition.


  3. Re: New AMD64 install

    AJackson wrote:
    > On Apr 28, 5:24 pm, ken scharf wrote:
    >> OK, I've downloaded CD#1 for KDE on AMD64 and I'm getting up the nerve
    >> to install over my present Gentoo system. Actually, I won't lose
    >> Gentoo, I've added two new SATA disks and will go with a RAID1-LVM install.
    >>
    >> My question is how to set up the disks. I've heard that you can't put
    >> the root partition on LVM, yet I've also seen instructions that have you
    >> do just that! (I know you can't BOOT from LVM, so I will have a
    >> separate raid1 partition on each disk for /boot, which will look like a
    >> normal non-raid partition to grub or lilo).
    >>
    >> So what is the truth here, can I just have raid partitions one for /boot
    >> and one for the lvm group that will have "/", "/home", and "swap" OR
    >> do I really need a plain raid partition for "/" outside of LVM?

    >
    > I guess that you can have the disc set up you asked for, with only a
    > "plain" /boot-parition (have not tried that yet, but I will when I
    > get my hands on a new installation, and not just upgrading ;-)). But
    > it is easy to check out. Make a small test installation to get Debian
    > started. If it doues work, start a full installation (or just
    > continue with "aptitude install kde kdm"). If not, restart with
    > another disc layout.
    > But as I wrote, it should work with just a plain /boot-partition.
    >

    Well I went though the install using all the options in the disk
    partition screen. I set up two Raid1 arrays, one for /boot and one for
    /. I also set up two swap partitions (one on each disk). I then built
    an LVM array on the larger Raid and created "/", and "/home" file
    systems. Then I let the installer do all the dirty work. It created an
    irdisk and installed the boot loader. Works fine! I added an
    additional Lilo target to boot the mbr of my old hard disk with Gentoo
    on it. Thats either a 2,3 or 4 step boot to get to Gentoo!
    When I have the free time I'll copy my home partition from Gentoo to
    Debian and move in! Still need to figure out what packages I still need
    to install (xawtv, sane, gimp or is that there by default?).
    Gentoo was good (still is) but the upgrade path is sometimes like
    Russian Roulette and mating elephants. (Might shoot yourself in the
    head and takes a long time to compile).

  4. Re: New AMD64 install

    Thanks for the report

    On May 3, 2:53 am, ken scharf wrote:
    > Well I went though the install using all the options in the disk
    > partition screen. I set up two Raid1 arrays, one for /boot and one for
    > /. I also set up two swap partitions (one on each disk). I then built
    > an LVM array on the larger Raid and created "/", and "/home" file
    > systems. Then I let the installer do all the dirty work. It created an
    > irdisk and installed the boot loader. Works fine! I added an
    > additional Lilo target to boot the mbr of my old hard disk with Gentoo
    > on it. Thats either a 2,3 or 4 step boot to get to Gentoo!
    > When I have the free time I'll copy my home partition from Gentoo to
    > Debian and move in! Still need to figure out what packages I still need
    > to install (xawtv, sane, gimp or is that there by default?).
    > Gentoo was good (still is) but the upgrade path is sometimes like
    > Russian Roulette and mating elephants. (Might shoot yourself in the
    > head and takes a long time to compile).


    Let's see if I got it right:
    You made two disks a RAID mirror

    /boot on raid array 1
    LVM on raid array 2
    swap on raid array 3 (on on each disk in the "array")

    On LVM you made two partitions / and /home

    I would also try to make Debian and Gentoo to use same /home and same
    uid for each user on both systems. It works for me, but I only run
    different Debian releases on my installed systems.
    =======
    About booting different distrinbutions/kernels

    I usally makes on boot menu for each Linux installation on my
    machines. So on one I only run one kernel.
    If I want another installation (other distribution OR other kernel/
    same distribution) I do make a separate boot menu for that one.

    My partitions:
    /dev/hda1 NTFS (when I want to be convinced that MS Windows XP
    works in that braindead way, And I paid for it!)
    /dev/hda2 ext3 /boot
    /dev/hda3 extended
    /dev/hda5 jfs / Etch
    /dev/hda6 ext3 / Testing
    /dev/hda7 swap file
    /dev/hda8 reiserfs /home
    (If I did this now, I would have made it all on a LVM, except two
    small boot partitions)

    I first makes Grub install booting from /dev/hda2 via /dev/hda (MBR)

    In Grubs boot menu file menu.lst in /dev/hda2 (/boot/grub/menu.lst) i
    manage all kernels that the system with root in /dev/hda5 (Etch)
    uses. So Grub/kernel packages do all managing of those there. No
    pain managing for me, which is good. It doesn't boot any linux thing
    from other root file system (/dev/hda6).
    I then added those lines after "Other operating systems" in /dev/
    hda2:s grub/menu.lst file:
    title Debian Testing (/dev/hda6)
    root (hd0,5)
    savedefault
    chainloader +1

    This makes Grub start the other systems Grub on /dev/hda6. That Grub
    meny is then managed by the Debian system with root file system on /
    dev/hda6. So THOSE grub/kernel packages manage that boot menu. No
    pain for me. I only add this to the end of /dev/hda6 /boot/grub/
    menu.lst to get back to first Grub and that menu.lst

    title Debian Etch (/dev/hda)
    root (hd0)
    chainloader +1

    So in short, I just chainload between different distributions boot
    programs (grub and lilo) to choose which distribution to boot. And I
    recommend only to run one kernel on each booting filesystem.

    This made my life a LOT easier than to manually manage which kernel
    should be started from which partition. And it is actually quite easy
    to manage. Just remember to put those last lines on each boot systeme
    to change between different booting partitions. Should work right
    selecting to boot from Debian or Gentoo too.

    Hope you can make something usefull out of this.

    Good luck.


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