USB2.0 Host controller card problems - Debian

This is a discussion on USB2.0 Host controller card problems - Debian ; Hello! I have an AMD/NSC 586 mainboard with 2 usb1.1 ports on it. To connect some more hardware I bought a VIA VT6212 Chipset ( VT6202 ) 5-Port USB2.0 PCI-Card Now, I thought, as the same controller works flawlessly in ...

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Thread: USB2.0 Host controller card problems

  1. USB2.0 Host controller card problems

    Hello!

    I have an AMD/NSC 586 mainboard with 2 usb1.1 ports on it. To connect some
    more hardware I bought a VIA VT6212 Chipset ( VT6202 ) 5-Port USB2.0
    PCI-Card

    Now, I thought, as the same controller works flawlessly in a AMD K6
    mainboard, that it would be same as easy to use in the older PC.
    It is not. Connecting USB1.1 devices to the 2.0 ports works, but connecting
    an USB2.0 device ( Printer, Harddisk, Scanner; yes, even Gamepad! (!) )
    brings the system to a halt and makes all three keyboard-LED's to blink in
    unity.

    I do attach the messages from DMESG from a successfull start, and manuall
    type the message that appears when I plug an USB2 device to the usb2 port.

    Successfull start: No USB2.0 device connected to USB2.0 controller:
    ##############
    Linux version 2.6.15-1-486 (Debian 2.6.15-7.1) (tomas@puga.vdu.lt) (gcc
    version 3.3.5 (Debian 1:3.3.5-13)) #2 Mon Feb 27 11:29:28 UTC 2006
    BIOS-provided physical RAM map:
    BIOS-e820: 0000000000000000 - 000000000009fc00 (usable)
    BIOS-e820: 000000000009fc00 - 00000000000a0000 (reserved)
    BIOS-e820: 00000000000f0000 - 0000000000100000 (reserved)
    BIOS-e820: 0000000000100000 - 0000000007e80000 (usable)
    BIOS-e820: 00000000ffff0000 - 0000000100000000 (reserved)
    126MB LOWMEM available.
    On node 0 totalpages: 32384
    DMA zone: 4096 pages, LIFO batch:0
    DMA32 zone: 0 pages, LIFO batch:0
    Normal zone: 28288 pages, LIFO batch:7
    HighMem zone: 0 pages, LIFO batch:0
    DMI 2.2 present.
    ACPI: Unable to locate RSDP
    Allocating PCI resources starting at 10000000 (gap: 07e80000:f8170000)
    Built 1 zonelists
    Kernel command line: root=/dev/hda5 ro
    No local APIC present or hardware disabled
    mapped APIC to ffffd000 (010fe000)
    Initializing CPU#0
    PID hash table entries: 512 (order: 9, 8192 bytes)
    Detected 233.907 MHz processor.
    Using tsc for high-res timesource
    Console: colour VGA+ 80x25
    Dentry cache hash table entries: 16384 (order: 4, 65536 bytes)
    Inode-cache hash table entries: 8192 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
    Memory: 120628k/129536k available (1543k kernel code, 8380k reserved, 635k
    data, 232k init, 0k highmem)
    Checking if this processor honours the WP bit even in supervisor mode... Ok.
    Calibrating delay using timer specific routine.. 476.44 BogoMIPS
    (lpj=238220)
    Security Framework v1.0.0 initialized
    SELinux: Disabled at boot.
    Capability LSM initialized
    Mount-cache hash table entries: 512
    CPU: After generic identify, caps: 00808131 01818131 00000000 00000000
    00000000 00000000 00000000
    CPU: After vendor identify, caps: 00808131 01818131 00000000 00000000
    00000000 00000000 00000000
    Working around Cyrix MediaGX virtual DMA bugs.
    Enable Memory-Write-back mode on Cyrix/NSC processor.
    Enable Memory access reorder on Cyrix/NSC processor.
    Enable Incrementor on Cyrix/NSC processor.
    CPU: After all inits, caps: 00808131 00818131 00000000 00000001 00000000
    00000000 00000000
    mtrr: v2.0 (20020519)
    CPU: Cyrix MediaGXtm MMXtm Enhanced stepping 04
    Checking 'hlt' instruction... OK.
    checking if image is initramfs... it is
    Freeing initrd memory: 4458k freed
    NET: Registered protocol family 16
    EISA bus registered
    PCI: PCI BIOS revision 2.10 entry at 0xfb1e0, last bus=0
    PCI: Using configuration type 1
    ACPI: Subsystem revision 20050902
    ACPI: Interpreter disabled.
    Linux Plug and Play Support v0.97 (c) Adam Belay
    pnp: PnP ACPI: disabled
    PnPBIOS: Scanning system for PnP BIOS support...
    PnPBIOS: Found PnP BIOS installation structure at 0xc00fbe10
    PnPBIOS: PnP BIOS version 1.0, entry 0xf0000:0xbe38, dseg 0xf0000
    PnPBIOS: 18 nodes reported by PnP BIOS; 18 recorded by driver
    PCI: Probing PCI hardware
    PCI: Probing PCI hardware (bus 00)
    Boot video device is 0000:00:12.4
    PCI: Using IRQ router NatSemi [1078/0100] at 0000:00:12.0
    pnp: 00:0d: ioport range 0x800-0x80f has been reserved
    pnp: 00:0d: ioport range 0x900-0x90f has been reserved
    PCI: Ignore bogus resource 6 [0:0] of 0000:00:12.4
    audit: initializing netlink socket (disabled)
    audit(1141435931.446:1): initialized
    VFS: Disk quotas dquot_6.5.1
    Dquot-cache hash table entries: 1024 (order 0, 4096 bytes)
    Initializing Cryptographic API
    io scheduler noop registered
    io scheduler anticipatory registered
    io scheduler deadline registered
    io scheduler cfq registered
    isapnp: Scanning for PnP cards...
    isapnp: No Plug & Play device found
    PNP: PS/2 Controller [PNP0303,PNP0f13] at 0x60,0x64 irq 1,12
    serio: i8042 AUX port at 0x60,0x64 irq 12
    serio: i8042 KBD port at 0x60,0x64 irq 1
    Serial: 8250/16550 driver $Revision: 1.90 $ 4 ports, IRQ sharing enabled
    serial8250: ttyS0 at I/O 0x3f8 (irq = 4) is a 16550A
    serial8250: ttyS1 at I/O 0x2f8 (irq = 3) is a 16550A
    00:0e: ttyS0 at I/O 0x3f8 (irq = 4) is a 16550A
    00:12: ttyS1 at I/O 0x2f8 (irq = 3) is a 16550A
    RAMDISK driver initialized: 16 RAM disks of 8192K size 1024 blocksize
    EISA: Probing bus 0 at eisa.0
    EISA: Detected 0 cards.
    NET: Registered protocol family 2
    IP route cache hash table entries: 1024 (order: 0, 4096 bytes)
    TCP established hash table entries: 4096 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
    TCP bind hash table entries: 4096 (order: 2, 16384 bytes)
    TCP: Hash tables configured (established 4096 bind 4096)
    TCP reno registered
    TCP bic registered
    NET: Registered protocol family 1
    NET: Registered protocol family 17
    NET: Registered protocol family 8
    NET: Registered protocol family 20
    Using IPI Shortcut mode
    Freeing unused kernel memory: 232k freed
    input: AT Translated Set 2 keyboard as /class/input/input0
    usbcore: registered new driver usbfs
    usbcore: registered new driver hub
    USB Universal Host Controller Interface driver v2.3
    PCI: Found IRQ 15 for device 0000:00:07.0
    uhci_hcd 0000:00:07.0: UHCI Host Controller
    uhci_hcd 0000:00:07.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1
    uhci_hcd 0000:00:07.0: irq 11, io base 0x0000e000
    hub 1-0:1.0: USB hub found
    hub 1-0:1.0: 2 ports detected
    PCI: Found IRQ 9 for device 0000:00:07.1
    uhci_hcd 0000:00:07.1: UHCI Host Controller
    uhci_hcd 0000:00:07.1: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 2
    uhci_hcd 0000:00:07.1: irq 10, io base 0x0000e400
    hub 2-0:1.0: USB hub found
    hub 2-0:1.0: 2 ports detected
    PCI: Found IRQ 10 for device 0000:00:07.2
    ehci_hcd 0000:00:07.2: EHCI Host Controller
    ehci_hcd 0000:00:07.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 3
    ehci_hcd 0000:00:07.2: irq 9, io mem 0xd8000000
    ehci_hcd 0000:00:07.2: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00, driver 10 Dec 2004
    hub 3-0:1.0: USB hub found
    hub 3-0:1.0: 4 ports detected
    8139too Fast Ethernet driver 0.9.27
    PCI: Found IRQ 9 for device 0000:00:0f.0
    eth0: RealTek RTL8139 at 0xe800, 00:e0:c5:c9:05:e5, IRQ 10
    eth0: Identified 8139 chip type 'RTL-8139B'
    8139cp: 10/100 PCI Ethernet driver v1.2 (Mar 22, 2004)
    Uniform Multi-Platform E-IDE driver Revision: 7.00alpha2
    ide: Assuming 33MHz system bus speed for PIO modes; override with idebus=xx
    CS5530: IDE controller at PCI slot 0000:00:12.2
    CS5530: chipset revision 0
    CS5530: not 100% native mode: will probe irqs later
    PCI: Setting latency timer of device 0000:00:12.0 to 64
    ide0: BM-DMA at 0xf000-0xf007, BIOS settings: hdaMA, hdbio
    ide1: BM-DMA at 0xf008-0xf00f, BIOS settings: hdcio, hddio
    Probing IDE interface ide0...
    hda: IC25N020ATCS04-0, ATA DISK drive
    ohci_hcd: 2005 April 22 USB 1.1 'Open' Host Controller (OHCI) Driver (PCI)
    hda: cs5530_set_xfer_mode(PIO 4)
    hda: cs5530_set_xfer_mode(UDMA 2)
    ide0 at 0x1f0-0x1f7,0x3f6 on irq 14
    Probing IDE interface ide1...
    PCI: Found IRQ 11 for device 0000:00:13.0
    ohci_hcd 0000:00:13.0: OHCI Host Controller
    ohci_hcd 0000:00:13.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 4
    ohci_hcd 0000:00:13.0: irq 15, io mem 0xd8005000
    hub 4-0:1.0: USB hub found
    hub 4-0:1.0: 2 ports detected
    usb 4-2: new full speed USB device using ohci_hcd and address 2
    usb 4-2: not running at top speed; connect to a high speed hub
    hda: max request size: 128KiB
    hda: 39070080 sectors (20003 MB) w/1768KiB Cache, CHS=38760/16/63, UDMA(33)
    hda: cache flushes not supported
    hda: hda1 < hda5 hda6 hda7 hda8 >
    SCSI subsystem initialized
    Initializing USB Mass Storage driver...
    scsi0 : SCSI emulation for USB Mass Storage devices
    usbcore: registered new driver usb-storage
    USB Mass Storage support registered.
    usb-storage: device found at 2
    usb-storage: waiting for device to settle before scanning
    Vendor: USB 2.0 Model: Storage Device Rev: 0111
    Type: Direct-Access ANSI SCSI revision: 00
    usb-storage: device scan complete
    SCSI device sda: 488397164 512-byte hdwr sectors (250059 MB)
    sda: assuming drive cache: write through
    SCSI device sda: 488397163 512-byte hdwr sectors (250059 MB)
    sda: assuming drive cache: write through
    sda: sda1 sda2 < sda5 sda6 sda7 sda8 sda9 sda10 sda11 >
    sd 0:0:0:0: Attached scsi disk sda
    Probing IDE interface ide1...
    ReiserFS: hda5: found reiserfs format "3.6" with standard journal
    ReiserFS: hda5: using ordered data mode
    ReiserFS: hda5: journal params: device hda5, size 8192, journal first block
    18, max trans len 1024, max batch 900, max commit age 30, max trans age 30
    ReiserFS: hda5: checking transaction log (hda5)
    ReiserFS: hda5: Using r5 hash to sort names
    input: PC Speaker as /class/input/input1
    Real Time Clock Driver v1.12
    parport: PnPBIOS parport detected.
    parport0: PC-style at 0x378 (0x778), irq 7, dma 3
    [PCSPP,TRISTATE,COMPAT,EPP,ECP,DMA]
    FDC 0 is a National Semiconductor PC87306
    input: ImPS/2 Generic Wheel Mouse as /class/input/input2
    mice: PS/2 mouse device common for all mice
    Unable to find swap-space signature
    ReiserFS: hda7: found reiserfs format "3.6" with standard journal
    ReiserFS: hda7: using ordered data mode
    ReiserFS: hda7: journal params: device hda7, size 8192, journal first block
    18, max trans len 1024, max batch 900, max commit age 30, max trans age 30
    ReiserFS: hda7: checking transaction log (hda7)
    ReiserFS: hda7: Using r5 hash to sort names
    ReiserFS: hda6: found reiserfs format "3.6" with standard journal
    ReiserFS: hda6: using ordered data mode
    ReiserFS: hda6: journal params: device hda6, size 8192, journal first block
    18, max trans len 1024, max batch 900, max commit age 30, max trans age 30
    ReiserFS: hda6: checking transaction log (hda6)
    ReiserFS: hda6: Using r5 hash to sort names
    Unable to find swap-space signature
    eth0: link up, 100Mbps, full-duplex, lpa 0x45E1
    NET: Registered protocol family 10
    lo: Disabled Privacy Extensions
    IPv6 over IPv4 tunneling driver
    eth0: no IPv6 routers present
    lp0: using parport0 (interrupt-driven).
    hda: drive_cmd: status=0x51 { DriveReady SeekComplete Error }
    hda: drive_cmd: error=0x10 { SectorIdNotFound }, LBAsect=12734214, sector=0
    ide: failed opcode was: 0xb0
    parport0: FIFO is stuck
    parport0: BUSY timeout (1) in compat_write_block_pio
    parport0: FIFO is stuck
    parport0: BUSY timeout (1) in compat_write_block_pio
    parport0: FIFO is stuck
    parport0: BUSY timeout (1) in compat_write_block_pio
    parport0: FIFO is stuck
    parport0: BUSY timeout (1) in compat_write_block_pio
    usb 4-2: USB disconnect, address 2
    usb 4-2: new full speed USB device using ohci_hcd and address 3
    usb 4-2: not running at top speed; connect to a high speed hub
    scsi1 : SCSI emulation for USB Mass Storage devices
    usb-storage: device found at 3
    usb-storage: waiting for device to settle before scanning
    Vendor: USB 2.0 Model: Storage Device Rev: 0111
    Type: Direct-Access ANSI SCSI revision: 00
    SCSI device sda: 488397162 512-byte hdwr sectors (250059 MB)
    sda: assuming drive cache: write through
    SCSI device sda: 488397161 512-byte hdwr sectors (250059 MB)
    sda: assuming drive cache: write through
    sda: sda1 sda2 < sda5 sda6 sda7 sda8 sda9 sda10 sda11 >
    sd 1:0:0:0: Attached scsi disk sda
    usb-storage: device scan complete

    ##############


    now I plug a usb1.1 mouse into the USB2 controller:

    ############


    ############
    Wow - okay. Even that toasts the system - Plugged into another computer the
    USB2-controller works flawlessly

    System is Debian stable, just separately installed 2.6.15 Kernel from Debian
    unstable

    basic vanilla 486'er Kernel.
    I tried:
    Boot the system with the noapic boot parameter
    Boot the system with the pci=routeirq
    Boot the system with the pci=noacpi boot parameter
    Boot the system with the acpi=off boot parameter
    Boot the system with the irqpoll boot parameter

    so far none of those helped.
    when I manually delete the file EHCI_USB.KO everything works fine - just,
    Igot a set of USB1.1 ports only , no USB2.0.

    Any help welcome. Hints and suggestions needed
    --
    Sincerely

    Ruediger


  2. Re: USB2.0 Host controller card problems


    Ruediger wrote:
    > Hello!
    >
    > I have an AMD/NSC 586 mainboard with 2 usb1.1 ports on it. To connect some
    > more hardware I bought a VIA VT6212 Chipset ( VT6202 ) 5-Port USB2.0
    > PCI-Card
    >
    > Now, I thought, as the same controller works flawlessly in a AMD K6
    > mainboard, that it would be same as easy to use in the older PC.
    > It is not. Connecting USB1.1 devices to the 2.0 ports works, but connecting
    > an USB2.0 device ( Printer, Harddisk, Scanner; yes, even Gamepad! (!) )
    > brings the system to a halt and makes all three keyboard-LED's to blink in
    > unity.
    >
    > I do attach the messages from DMESG from a successfull start, and manuall
    > type the message that appears when I plug an USB2 device to the usb2 port.
    >
    > Successfull start: No USB2.0 device connected to USB2.0 controller:
    > ##############
    > Linux version 2.6.15-1-486 (Debian 2.6.15-7.1) (tomas@puga.vdu.lt) (gcc
    > version 3.3.5 (Debian 1:3.3.5-13)) #2 Mon Feb 27 11:29:28 UTC 2006
    > BIOS-provided physical RAM map:


    [snipped dmsg output]

    > ##############
    >
    >
    > now I plug a usb1.1 mouse into the USB2 controller:
    >
    > ############
    >
    >
    > ############
    > Wow - okay. Even that toasts the system - Plugged into another computer the
    > USB2-controller works flawlessly
    >
    > System is Debian stable, just separately installed 2.6.15 Kernel from Debian
    > unstable
    >
    > basic vanilla 486'er Kernel.
    > I tried:
    > Boot the system with the noapic boot parameter
    > Boot the system with the pci=routeirq
    > Boot the system with the pci=noacpi boot parameter
    > Boot the system with the acpi=off boot parameter
    > Boot the system with the irqpoll boot parameter
    >
    > so far none of those helped.
    > when I manually delete the file EHCI_USB.KO everything works fine - just,
    > Igot a set of USB1.1 ports only , no USB2.0.
    >
    > Any help welcome. Hints and suggestions needed
    > --
    > Sincerely
    >
    > Ruediger


    not sure if the BUG described here is relevant, but perhaps;
    http://www.knoppix.net/forum/viewtop...?p=97923#97923


  3. Re: USB2.0 Host controller card problems


    Ruediger wrote:
    > Hello!
    >
    > I have an AMD/NSC 586 mainboard with 2 usb1.1 ports on it. To connect some
    > more hardware I bought a VIA VT6212 Chipset ( VT6202 ) 5-Port USB2.0
    > PCI-Card
    >
    > Now, I thought, as the same controller works flawlessly in a AMD K6
    > mainboard, that it would be same as easy to use in the older PC.
    > It is not. Connecting USB1.1 devices to the 2.0 ports works, but connecting
    > an USB2.0 device ( Printer, Harddisk, Scanner; yes, even Gamepad! (!) )
    > brings the system to a halt and makes all three keyboard-LED's to blink in
    > unity.
    >
    > I do attach the messages from DMESG from a successfull start, and manuall
    > type the message that appears when I plug an USB2 device to the usb2 port.
    >
    > Successfull start: No USB2.0 device connected to USB2.0 controller:
    > ##############
    > Linux version 2.6.15-1-486 (Debian 2.6.15-7.1) (tomas@puga.vdu.lt) (gcc
    > version 3.3.5 (Debian 1:3.3.5-13)) #2 Mon Feb 27 11:29:28 UTC 2006
    > BIOS-provided physical RAM map:
    > BIOS-e820: 0000000000000000 - 000000000009fc00 (usable)
    > BIOS-e820: 000000000009fc00 - 00000000000a0000 (reserved)
    > BIOS-e820: 00000000000f0000 - 0000000000100000 (reserved)
    > BIOS-e820: 0000000000100000 - 0000000007e80000 (usable)
    > BIOS-e820: 00000000ffff0000 - 0000000100000000 (reserved)
    > 126MB LOWMEM available.
    > On node 0 totalpages: 32384
    > DMA zone: 4096 pages, LIFO batch:0
    > DMA32 zone: 0 pages, LIFO batch:0
    > Normal zone: 28288 pages, LIFO batch:7
    > HighMem zone: 0 pages, LIFO batch:0
    > DMI 2.2 present.
    > ACPI: Unable to locate RSDP
    > Allocating PCI resources starting at 10000000 (gap: 07e80000:f8170000)


    [snip]

    > so far none of those helped.
    > when I manually delete the file EHCI_USB.KO everything works fine - just,
    > Igot a set of USB1.1 ports only , no USB2.0.
    >
    > Any help welcome. Hints and suggestions needed
    > --


    Hi again -- On further look - what I posted above doesn't *seem* to be
    relevant....

    Do all the PCI USB2.0 card ports work at 1.1 speeds ??

    If so -- I don't think it's ever going to work at 2.0 speeds since that
    Chipset is so old, it has no support for 2.0

    (You are not using a LiveCD.....correct?)
    Do me a favor and try these boot codes;
    (one at a time, then both)

    acpi=force #(this is Advanced Config and Power Interface)
    apic=force #(this is Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller)


    For comparison -- here's a setup (350MHz PII, 100MHz FSB) and some
    dmesg

    $ dmesg
    Linux version 2.6.8-2-386 (gcc version 3.3.5 (Debian 1:3.3.5-13)) #1
    Tue Aug 16 12:46:35 UTC 2005

    $ dmesg | grep -i PIC
    Local APIC disabled by BIOS -- reenabling.
    Found and enabled local APIC!
    Using local APIC timer interrupts.
    calibrating APIC timer ...
    ACPI: Using PIC for interrupt routing

    Now you may not even have APIC, nor ACPI support on a 233MHz CPU
    system...

    Also try;
    -- Enable any APM (Advanced Power Management) in the BIOS
    -- Move the PCI Card to a higher PCI slot (swap with another if
    necessary)


  4. Re: USB2.0 Host controller card problems

    iforone wrote:

    >
    > Ruediger wrote:

    ****snipped my old post****
    >> Any help welcome. Hints and suggestions needed
    >> --

    >
    > Hi again -- On further look - what I posted above doesn't *seem* to be
    > relevant....
    >
    > Do all the PCI USB2.0 card ports work at 1.1 speeds ??
    >
    > If so -- I don't think it's ever going to work at 2.0 speeds since that
    > Chipset is so old, it has no support for 2.0
    >
    > (You are not using a LiveCD.....correct?)
    > Do me a favor and try these boot codes;
    > (one at a time, then both)
    >
    > acpi=force #(this is Advanced Config and Power Interface)
    > apic=force #(this is Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller)
    >
    >
    > For comparison -- here's a setup (350MHz PII, 100MHz FSB) and some
    > dmesg
    >
    > $ dmesg
    > Linux version 2.6.8-2-386 (gcc version 3.3.5 (Debian 1:3.3.5-13)) #1
    > Tue Aug 16 12:46:35 UTC 2005
    >
    > $ dmesg | grep -i PIC
    > Local APIC disabled by BIOS -- reenabling.
    > Found and enabled local APIC!
    > Using local APIC timer interrupts.
    > calibrating APIC timer ...
    > ACPI: Using PIC for interrupt routing
    >
    > Now you may not even have APIC, nor ACPI support on a 233MHz CPU
    > system...
    >
    > Also try;
    > -- Enable any APM (Advanced Power Management) in the BIOS
    > -- Move the PCI Card to a higher PCI slot (swap with another if
    > necessary)


    No LiveCD - the system is installed on a 20GB 2.5" HD - the system is my
    homeserver - the Geode are one of the few noticeable x86 CPU's - the entire
    system needs about 14W electrical power per hour whilst under full load.

    The system - it was once designed as a thin client or a
    communications-server (Thinclient it is when you plug in a Disk-on-chip
    instead of the harddisk )

    Oh, and I mixed up EHCI and UHCI. Its uhci_hcd.ko which must be deleted to
    get a set of working USB1.1 ports.

    I found a way to get the Ports working at USB2.0 mode, the Via chipset is
    old, but usually a really reliable one. googling for the chipset and linux
    I came across a website suggesting to add

    pci=noirq

    to the kernel-parameters. Voila - it works!

    Pitily the USB2.0 speed with datatransfers is now according to "hdparm
    -t /dev/sdb" 32,97kB/s ; whilst the internal USB1.1 port get a reliable
    935kB/s - so, that means my USB2.0 ports are slower than the USB1.1
    ports :/
    The PCI interface itself is faster: An AHA2970 SCSI controller gets easily
    9,17MB/s with no CPU-load whatsoever off the same harddisk using an
    IDE2SCSI-bridge on the drive.
    Stupid: most PC-users don't have SCSI
    That much about using the drive as an SCSI-box to transfer files...

    Okay - plugging the card into a Desktop, an Athlon 1200.
    hdparm -t /dev/sda it's here:
    42,3MB/sec

    So the card itself delivers the speed - no doubt.

    I'm struck - the SCSI-card boasts the speed in the 233MHz Geode-PC;
    the USB-Card ... not at all. So basically the hardware is capable to handle
    datatransfers that fast - but not with USB?

    How much more CPU-Power does USB consume compared with SCSI? I thought USB
    as a "smart device technology" would produce less overhead than good old
    SCSI?

    dmesg | grep -i PIC

    -> No result ( empty line, thats all )

    acpi=force

    ( system merrily goes to stall - System offers no ACPI; APM only, and the
    power capabilities of the Geode Chipset )

    apic=force

    ( system merrily goes to stall - Message during boot says "APIC not found or
    disabled in BIOS" )

    #######################################


    Conclusion so far:

    a) The card is fully operational and is a true certified USB2.0 card
    b) The system can handle fast datatransfers through the PCI-bus
    c) using the pci=noirq boot-option the system works reliable - but the
    USB2.0 ports get unbearably slow. Any other ( currently tested ) option as
    mentioned in previous posts does not prevent the system to go to a stall
    when plugging in an USB2.0 device into the USB2.0 ports
    d) manually hindering the system to load the UHCI / USB2.0 drivers gives me
    reliable, but slow USB1.1 ports.
    e) my external harddrive is a true fully certified USB2.0 drive with an
    average speed of about 42MB/s
    f) it IS an IRQ-problem - it appears almost identical when using Windows XP,
    so it is probably not a software problem itself, but maybe a
    hardware-problem.

    Suggestions? What tricks are known to handle IRQ-troubles on the PCI-bus?
    The integrated Ethernet-card ( Realtek 8139 (cp & too) ) shares IRQ10 with
    the USB2.0 card.

    I've run out of ideas - I am happy that with pci=noirq I got at least an
    operational system - but thats all I am able to help myself with.

    More ideas? Anyone?

    --
    Sincerely

    Ruediger


  5. Re: USB2.0 Host controller card problems


    Ruediger wrote:
    > iforone wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Ruediger wrote:

    > ****snipped my old post****
    > >> Any help welcome. Hints and suggestions needed
    > >> --

    > >
    > > Hi again -- On further look - what I posted above doesn't *seem* to be
    > > relevant....
    > >
    > > Do all the PCI USB2.0 card ports work at 1.1 speeds ??
    > >
    > > If so -- I don't think it's ever going to work at 2.0 speeds since that
    > > Chipset is so old, it has no support for 2.0
    > >
    > > (You are not using a LiveCD.....correct?)
    > > Do me a favor and try these boot codes;
    > > (one at a time, then both)
    > >
    > > acpi=force #(this is Advanced Config and Power Interface)
    > > apic=force #(this is Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller)
    > >
    > >
    > > For comparison -- here's a setup (350MHz PII, 100MHz FSB) and some
    > > dmesg
    > >
    > > $ dmesg
    > > Linux version 2.6.8-2-386 (gcc version 3.3.5 (Debian 1:3.3.5-13)) #1
    > > Tue Aug 16 12:46:35 UTC 2005
    > >
    > > $ dmesg | grep -i PIC
    > > Local APIC disabled by BIOS -- reenabling.
    > > Found and enabled local APIC!
    > > Using local APIC timer interrupts.
    > > calibrating APIC timer ...
    > > ACPI: Using PIC for interrupt routing
    > >
    > > Now you may not even have APIC, nor ACPI support on a 233MHz CPU
    > > system...
    > >
    > > Also try;
    > > -- Enable any APM (Advanced Power Management) in the BIOS
    > > -- Move the PCI Card to a higher PCI slot (swap with another if
    > > necessary)

    >
    > No LiveCD - the system is installed on a 20GB 2.5" HD - the system is my
    > homeserver - the Geode are one of the few noticeable x86 CPU's - the entire
    > system needs about 14W electrical power per hour whilst under full load.
    >
    > The system - it was once designed as a thin client or a
    > communications-server (Thinclient it is when you plug in a Disk-on-chip
    > instead of the harddisk )
    >
    > Oh, and I mixed up EHCI and UHCI. Its uhci_hcd.ko which must be deleted to
    > get a set of working USB1.1 ports.
    >
    > I found a way to get the Ports working at USB2.0 mode, the Via chipset is
    > old, but usually a really reliable one. googling for the chipset and linux
    > I came across a website suggesting to add
    >
    > pci=noirq
    >
    > to the kernel-parameters. Voila - it works!
    >
    > Pitily the USB2.0 speed with datatransfers is now according to "hdparm
    > -t /dev/sdb" 32,97kB/s ; whilst the internal USB1.1 port get a reliable
    > 935kB/s - so, that means my USB2.0 ports are slower than the USB1.1
    > ports :/
    > The PCI interface itself is faster: An AHA2970 SCSI controller gets easily
    > 9,17MB/s with no CPU-load whatsoever off the same harddisk using an
    > IDE2SCSI-bridge on the drive.
    > Stupid: most PC-users don't have SCSI
    > That much about using the drive as an SCSI-box to transfer files...
    >
    > Okay - plugging the card into a Desktop, an Athlon 1200.
    > hdparm -t /dev/sda it's here:
    > 42,3MB/sec
    >
    > So the card itself delivers the speed - no doubt.
    >
    > I'm struck - the SCSI-card boasts the speed in the 233MHz Geode-PC;
    > the USB-Card ... not at all. So basically the hardware is capable to handle
    > datatransfers that fast - but not with USB?
    >
    > How much more CPU-Power does USB consume compared with SCSI? I thought USB
    > as a "smart device technology" would produce less overhead than good old
    > SCSI?
    >
    > dmesg | grep -i PIC
    >
    > -> No result ( empty line, thats all )
    >
    > acpi=force
    >
    > ( system merrily goes to stall - System offers no ACPI; APM only, and the
    > power capabilities of the Geode Chipset )
    >
    > apic=force
    >
    > ( system merrily goes to stall - Message during boot says "APIC not found or
    > disabled in BIOS" )
    >
    > #######################################
    >
    >
    > Conclusion so far:
    >
    > a) The card is fully operational and is a true certified USB2.0 card
    > b) The system can handle fast datatransfers through the PCI-bus
    > c) using the pci=noirq boot-option the system works reliable - but the
    > USB2.0 ports get unbearably slow. Any other ( currently tested ) option as
    > mentioned in previous posts does not prevent the system to go to a stall
    > when plugging in an USB2.0 device into the USB2.0 ports
    > d) manually hindering the system to load the UHCI / USB2.0 drivers gives me
    > reliable, but slow USB1.1 ports.
    > e) my external harddrive is a true fully certified USB2.0 drive with an
    > average speed of about 42MB/s
    > f) it IS an IRQ-problem - it appears almost identical when using Windows XP,
    > so it is probably not a software problem itself, but maybe a
    > hardware-problem.


    I'd say hardware, but not the PCI Card itself

    > Suggestions? What tricks are known to handle IRQ-troubles on the PCI-bus?
    > The integrated Ethernet-card ( Realtek 8139 (cp & too) ) shares IRQ10 with
    > the USB2.0 card.


    That can be a problem with using pci=noirq

    > I've run out of ideas - I am happy that with pci=noirq I got at least an
    > operational system - but thats all I am able to help myself with.
    >
    > More ideas? Anyone?
    >
    > --
    > Sincerely
    >
    > Ruediger


    Hi;
    a few points;

    * USB, while serial and bidirectional, was never even remotely designed
    for portable, nor mobile standards... (look it up). Firewire is a much
    better alternative. Heck, nowadays I'd prefer SATA/SAS over ATA/IDE,
    and PCI-E/eSATA over Firewire -- and anything over USB.

    * pci=noirq would not be my selection, since I *do* want my (Desktop)
    IRQ steering, sharing and assignments to be done via the PCI BUS
    Interrupt Controller - as well as interacting with the 'typical'
    ATA/IDE as well as the PCI to USB BusMastering Controllers (your
    ThinClient doen't have this for ATA/IDE I suppose)

    *SCSI is an excellent multi-tasking, high I/O interface that really
    only requires 1 IRQ for many devices - so your PCI, IRQ, and USB woes
    are not likely going to affect the SCSI performance.

    I would perhaps suggest looking into how udev, hotplug and D-BUS as
    well as "modules" / loaded modules factor into all this;
    a start; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Udev

    Unfortunately I'm not that experienced with Linux yet...

    With kind regards


  6. Re: USB2.0 Host controller card problems

    iforone wrote:

    8<---8<---8< (snipped)
    >
    > Hi;
    > a few points;
    >
    > * USB, while serial and bidirectional, was never even remotely designed
    > for portable, nor mobile standards... (look it up). Firewire is a much
    > better alternative. Heck, nowadays I'd prefer SATA/SAS over ATA/IDE,
    > and PCI-E/eSATA over Firewire -- and anything over USB.
    >
    > * pci=noirq would not be my selection, since I *do* want my (Desktop)
    > IRQ steering, sharing and assignments to be done via the PCI BUS
    > Interrupt Controller - as well as interacting with the 'typical'
    > ATA/IDE as well as the PCI to USB BusMastering Controllers (your
    > ThinClient doen't have this for ATA/IDE I suppose)
    >
    > *SCSI is an excellent multi-tasking, high I/O interface that really
    > only requires 1 IRQ for many devices - so your PCI, IRQ, and USB woes
    > are not likely going to affect the SCSI performance.
    >
    > I would perhaps suggest looking into how udev, hotplug and D-BUS as
    > well as "modules" / loaded modules factor into all this;
    > a start; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Udev
    >
    > Unfortunately I'm not that experienced with Linux yet...
    >
    > With kind regards


    Ouch. Okay, thanks a lot. I plugged the drive into the USB1.1 port and am at
    the moment now looking for a SCSI case - I've used SCSI ever since I got my
    first computer, which was equipped with it ( An Amiga A500 with the A570
    CD-Rom + SCSI extension ). Since most systems ( aside of the x86 world,
    that is ) use SCSI anyway, I have many SCSI components anyway - the only
    IDE-stuff I use were the cheap harddisks and CD/DVD-burners, latter I
    always equipped with IDE2SCSI-bridges, to connect them to my SCSI
    controllers.
    But in the thinclient there isn't enough space for anything except a 2.5"
    harddrive - and those are not available as SCSI anymore, so I thought the
    USB2.0 card would be a handy buy, allowing me to utilize the faster speed
    of USB2.0 to also get a bit more out of my printers, which have USB2.0
    compatible interfaces and which need like forever when printing from the
    USB1.1 port.



    --
    Sincerely

    Ruediger


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