xmodmap at X starting time - Debian

This is a discussion on xmodmap at X starting time - Debian ; In order to set the keyboard configuration, I would like to add the following line ''xmodmap /home/user/.xmodmaprc'' to the X start script. I added the preceding command line to the general ''/etc/X11/Xsession'', and the keyboard has no the right keymap ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: xmodmap at X starting time

  1. xmodmap at X starting time

    In order to set the keyboard configuration, I would like to add the
    following line ''xmodmap /home/user/.xmodmaprc'' to the X start script.
    I added the preceding command line to the general ''/etc/X11/Xsession'', and
    the keyboard has no the right keymap and keysymb, but if I add it to the
    local ~/user/.xsession, it has no effect !

    Pirouz
    Debian Sarge, on DELL Inspiron with kde 3.3, as windwow manager


  2. Re: xmodmap at X starting time

    pirouz writes:

    > In order to set the keyboard configuration, I would like to add the
    > following line ''xmodmap /home/user/.xmodmaprc'' to the X start script.
    > I added the preceding command line to the general ''/etc/X11/Xsession'', and
    > the keyboard has no the right keymap and keysymb, but if I add it to the
    > local ~/user/.xsession, it has no effect !


    Put a shell script in ~/.kde/Autostart and remember to give it execute
    permissions (chmod u+x filename).

    The script would then be something like this

    #!/bin/sh
    xmodmap /home/user/.xmodmaprc
    --
    Regards
    Jes Vestervang

  3. Re: xmodmap at X starting time

    Successfull !
    Thanks ! But, may I conclude that ~/.xsession is no more the user X startup
    script ?

    Jes Vestervang wrote:

    > pirouz writes:
    >
    >> In order to set the keyboard configuration, I would like to add the
    >> following line ''xmodmap /home/user/.xmodmaprc'' to the X start script.
    >> I added the preceding command line to the general ''/etc/X11/Xsession'',
    >> and the keyboard has no the right keymap and keysymb, but if I add it to
    >> the local ~/user/.xsession, it has no effect !

    >
    > Put a shell script in ~/.kde/Autostart and remember to give it execute
    > permissions (chmod u+x filename).
    >
    > The script would then be something like this
    >
    > #!/bin/sh
    > xmodmap /home/user/.xmodmaprc



  4. Re: xmodmap at X starting time

    On Sun, 12 Feb 2006 21:11:58 +0100, pirouz wrote:

    > I added the preceding command line to the general ''/etc/X11/Xsession'', and
    > the keyboard has no the right keymap and keysymb, but if I add it to the
    > local ~/user/.xsession, it has no effect !


    According to man xsession the file should be called $HOME/.Xsession -
    note the capital letter X.
    And this works for my without any problems.

    gregor
    --
    .''`. http://info.comodo.priv.at/ | gpg key ID: 0x00F3CFE4
    : :' : infos zur usenet-hierarchie at.*: http://www.usenet.at/
    `. `' member of https://www.vibe.at/ | how to reply: http://got.to/quote/
    `- NP: Kurt Ostbahn & Die Kombo: I waas gnua

  5. Re: xmodmap at X starting time

    On Sun, Feb 12 2006, gregor herrmann wrote:

    > On Sun, 12 Feb 2006 21:11:58 +0100, pirouz wrote:
    >
    >> I added the preceding command line to the general
    >> ''/etc/X11/Xsession'', and the keyboard has no the right keymap and
    >> keysymb, but if I add it to the local ~/user/.xsession, it has no
    >> effect !

    >
    > According to man xsession the file should be called $HOME/.Xsession -
    > note the capital letter X.
    > And this works for my without any problems.


    Either should work. According to xsession(5):

    ... if the line 'allow-user-xsession' is present in Xsession.options, a
    user-specified session program or script is used. In the latter
    case, two historically popular names for user X session scripts are
    searched for: $HOME/.xsession and $HOME/.Xsession (note the
    difference in case). The first one found is used.

    These are Debian specific changes, I think. I prefer to use the startx
    script, starting X and my window manager (FVWM2) from the command line.
    In this scenario, one would normally initialise startx using commands
    found in ~/.xinitrc, however Debian have combined the functionality of
    both into ~/.xsession. See startx(1).
    --
    Neil.
    One of the lessons of history is that nothing is often a good thing to
    do and always a clever thing to say.
    -- Will Durant

+ Reply to Thread