Re: Partitioning strategy for Linux experiments? - Debian

This is a discussion on Re: Partitioning strategy for Linux experiments? - Debian ; Chris : > Successfully installing Sarge has made me unwarrantedly confident about > experimenting - particularly with the support of people in this > newsgroup. > > Luckily I have a spare machine, which has an 80GB drive. > I'm ...

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Thread: Re: Partitioning strategy for Linux experiments?

  1. Re: Partitioning strategy for Linux experiments?

    Chris :
    > Successfully installing Sarge has made me unwarrantedly confident about
    > experimenting - particularly with the support of people in this
    > newsgroup.
    >
    > Luckily I have a spare machine, which has an 80GB drive.
    > I'm wondering about putting several OSs on it like this:
    >
    > Partition 1 XP
    > Partition 2 Vista


    Why? Where's the fun in those two?


    --
    Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
    (*) http://www.spots.ab.ca/~keeling
    - -

  2. Re: Partitioning strategy for Linux experiments?

    In article , s. keeling
    writes
    >Chris :
    >> Successfully installing Sarge has made me unwarrantedly confident about
    >> experimenting - particularly with the support of people in this
    >> newsgroup.
    >> Luckily I have a spare machine, which has an 80GB drive.
    >> I'm wondering about putting several OSs on it like this:
    >> Partition 1 XP
    >> Partition 2 Vista
    >>


    >Why? Where's the fun in those two?


    I thought someone would say that!
    Vista is interesting as a peek at the future - and some of the ideas are
    very interesting.
    XP is useful for being able to chat to one's neighbours - and also for
    familiar utilities. E.g. did you know you can use Partition Magic to
    resize a Linux partition on the fly? Takes a few seconds!
    Microsoft OSs in general are interesting because they are the extreme
    opposite of Linux, and so Linux and Microsoft between them define a
    continuum of computing. When exploring a subject it's useful to look at
    extremes.
    --
    Chris

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