Broken Boot - Debian

This is a discussion on Broken Boot - Debian ; I was trying to remove exim4, following a procedure I found, (something like this) sudo updatedb sudo aptitude install postfix sudo aptitude remove exim4 sudo aptitude purge exim4 sudo updatedb locate exim4 | grep conf (use output to locate and ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Broken Boot

  1. Broken Boot



    I was trying to remove exim4, following a procedure I found,

    (something like this)

    sudo updatedb
    sudo aptitude install postfix
    sudo aptitude remove exim4
    sudo aptitude purge exim4
    sudo updatedb
    locate exim4 | grep conf
    (use output to locate and remove all exim config and related files)
    sudo updatedb
    locate exim4
    (remove remaining exim files and directories)
    sudo updatedb
    (and then from here install the mta I want to use (qmail) )

    along the way I managed to break something, I have no idea what or
    where, but now when I boot linux It goes normally untill the point where
    it would start services and crank up the gui.

    Here instead of normal, it drops to a (text)login prompt. If I hit
    enter i get a message about the boot not being complete (though it never
    does). I can login as user or root here, but I'm entirely too new to
    this to know how to fix it. If this were windows I'd have to junk the
    thing, format and re-install. I presume that linux is sufficiently more
    robust and can be fixed short of the re-install.

    The question is, How?

    ====

    Madhusudan Singh wrote in
    news:435af413$0$41146$14726298@news.sunsite.dk:

    > Login as root at the command prompt. Issue "startx". Let it crash (I
    > am assuming it will, from what you describe). Then open
    > /var/log/XFree86.log (or Xorg.log), whichever has a later modification
    > date, and scroll to the end. Look for something that looks like an
    > error message. Post it here.


    Startx command gets "command not found" message.

    I looked in /var/log and found both XFree86.0.log and XFree86.0.log.old

    The only errors had something to do with the mouse. Here's the last part
    of XFree86.0.log...

    *** Begin log quote ***
    (II) Keyboard "Generic Keyboard" handled by legacy driver
    (**) Option "Protocol" "PS/2"
    (**) Configured Mouse: Protocol: "PS/2"
    (**) Option "CorePointer"
    (**) Configured Mouse: Core Pointer
    (**) Option "Device" "/dev/psaux"
    (**) Option "Emulate3Buttons" "true"
    (**) Configured Mouse: Emulate3Buttons, Emulate3Timeout: 50
    (**) Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
    (**) Configured Mouse: ZAxisMapping: buttons 4 and 5
    (**) Configured Mouse: Buttons: 5
    (**) Option "Protocol" "ImPS/2"
    (**) Generic Mouse: Protocol: "ImPS/2"
    (**) Option "SendCoreEvents" "true"
    (**) Generic Mouse: always reports core events
    (**) Option "Device" "/dev/input/mice"
    (EE) xf86OpenSerial: Cannot open device /dev/input/mice
    No such device.
    (EE) Generic Mouse: cannot open input device
    (EE) PreInit failed for input device "Generic Mouse"
    (II) UnloadModule: "mouse"
    (II) XINPUT: Adding extended input device "Configured Mouse" (type:
    MOUSE) (II) Configured Mouse: ps2EnableDataReporting: succeeded
    Warning: font renderer for ".pcf" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".pcf.Z" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".pcf.gz" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".snf" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".snf.Z" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".snf.gz" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".bdf" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".bdf.Z" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".bdf.gz" already registered at priority 0
    Warning: font renderer for ".pmf" already registered at priority 0
    Could not init font path element unix/:7100, removing from list!
    SetClientVersion: 0 9
    (II) Open APM successful
    (II) Loading sub module "int10"
    (II) LoadModule: "int10"
    (II) Reloading /usr/X11R6/lib/modules/linux/libint10.a
    (II) VESA(0): initializing int10
    (II) VESA(0): Primary V_BIOS segment is: 0xc000
    (II) VESA(0): VESA BIOS detected
    (II) VESA(0): VESA VBE Version 1.2
    (II) VESA(0): VESA VBE Total Mem: 4096 kB
    (II) VESA(0): VESA VBE OEM: S3 Incorporated. 86C325
    (II) VESA(0): virtual address = 0x40329000,
    physical address = 0xa0000, size = 65536
    (==) VESA(0): Default visual is TrueColor
    (**) VESA(0): DPMS enabled
    (==) RandR enabled
    (II) Configured Mouse: ps2EnableDataReporting: succeeded
    Could not init font path element unix/:7100, removing from list!

    ***End log quote***


    looking around more, I found that /etc/init.d/gdm successfully started
    the gui, but just below the password box the same text was there warning
    about the boot being incomplete.
    ====

    When I shutdown from that session, there wasn't near the usual amount of
    text scrolling...

    INIT reported sending all processes the TERM signal, and then the KILL
    signal. The last message is:

    INIT: No more processes left in this runlevel.

    At this point the system hangs untill I power it off.

    If somebody can help get me back to a normal boot I'd really appreciate
    it, I think I'm in just a bit over my head here.


  2. Re: Broken Boot

    Bill Marcum wrote in news:0c3s33-pgj.ln1@don.localnet:

    > On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 23:46:05 -0600, Ed
    > wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> I was trying to remove exim4, following a procedure I found,
    >>
    >> (something like this)
    >>
    >> sudo updatedb
    >> sudo aptitude install postfix
    >> sudo aptitude remove exim4
    >> sudo aptitude purge exim4
    >> sudo updatedb
    >> locate exim4 | grep conf
    >> (use output to locate and remove all exim config and related files)
    >> sudo updatedb
    >> locate exim4
    >> (remove remaining exim files and directories)
    >> sudo updatedb
    >> (and then from here install the mta I want to use (qmail) )
    >>
    >> along the way I managed to break something, I have no idea what or
    >> where, but now when I boot linux It goes normally untill the point where
    >> it would start services and crank up the gui.
    >>

    > Why do you do "sudo updatedb" so many times? What other files did you
    > remove? Why did you think it was necessary to remove files other than
    > those removed by "aptitude purge exim4"?


    Because that was the procedure defined on a web page (no, I don't still
    have the link) for removing exim4 completely.

    >> Here instead of normal, it drops to a (text)login prompt. If I hit
    >> enter i get a message about the boot not being complete (though it never
    >> does). I can login as user or root here, but I'm entirely too new to
    >> this to know how to fix it. If this were windows I'd have to junk the
    >> thing, format and re-install. I presume that linux is sufficiently more
    >> robust and can be fixed short of the re-install.
    >>

    > Try "dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86" (or xserver-xorg)


    I'll try that.

    since all the above, I've done a bunch of reading (online and examining
    scripts in init.d)... several of them refer to "rc.d", yet I can
    find NO files or directories with that name structure. assuming they're
    missing, How do I get them recreated? or will the above reconfigure take
    care of it?



  3. Re: Broken Boot

    Bill Marcum wrote in
    news:v8ds33-uvr.ln1@don.localnet:

    > On Fri, 04 Nov 2005 08:48:44 -0600, Ed
    > wrote:
    >> Bill Marcum wrote in
    >> news:0c3s33-pgj.ln1@don.localnet:
    >>
    >>> On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 23:46:05 -0600, Ed
    >>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>


    snip

    >>

    > You should have directories named /etc/rc0.d, /etc/rc1.d and so on.
    > If they don't exist, I'd be surprised if the system would boot.


    They don't. boot goes far enough to get a text login. How do I go about
    re-creating these directories? Can I do so short of re-installing?

  4. Re: Broken Boot

    >>>>> Ed writes:

    > Bill Marcum wrote in
    > news:v8ds33-uvr.ln1@don.localnet:


    >> You should have directories named /etc/rc0.d, /etc/rc1.d and so on.
    >> If they don't exist, I'd be surprised if the system would boot.


    > They don't. boot goes far enough to get a text login. How do I go about
    > re-creating these directories? Can I do so short of re-installing?


    The runlevel script directories (/etc/rc*.d/) are essential. It appears
    you have inadvertently deleted them.

    Your best option is to reinstall.

    --
    Neil.
    Air Conditioned Environment - Do not open Windows.

+ Reply to Thread