Race against time? - Debian

This is a discussion on Race against time? - Debian ; I'm starting to feel my way into Debian Sarge and am finding it both difficult and interesting. I bought two books which helped: "Debian GNU/Linux 3.X Bible" David B. Harris; Paperback; 17.49 "The Debian System: Concepts and Techniques" Maurice Krafft; ...

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Thread: Race against time?

  1. Race against time?

    I'm starting to feel my way into Debian Sarge and am finding it both
    difficult and interesting. I bought two books which helped:

    "Debian GNU/Linux 3.X Bible"
    David B. Harris; Paperback; 17.49

    "The Debian System: Concepts and Techniques"
    Maurice Krafft; Paperback; 21.68

    However, while daydreaming about the future, I wonder whether Debian
    will beat the clock? I have read that the end of operating systems is
    nigh.
    Chip manufacturers are working to produce chips that emulate a standard
    architecture - so that an operating system would be unnecessary.

    I am not knowledgeable enough to evaluate ideas like that, but, if
    anyone is interested, I would certainly value your opinions.
    --
    Chris

  2. Re: Race against time?

    "Chris" wrote in message
    news:NUcnzcCeVcaDFwGM@[127.0.0.1]...
    > I'm starting to feel my way into Debian Sarge and am finding it both
    > difficult and interesting. I bought two books which helped:
    >
    > "Debian GNU/Linux 3.X Bible"
    > David B. Harris; Paperback; 17.49
    >
    > "The Debian System: Concepts and Techniques"
    > Maurice Krafft; Paperback; 21.68
    >
    > However, while daydreaming about the future, I wonder whether Debian will
    > beat the clock? I have read that the end of operating systems is nigh.
    > Chip manufacturers are working to produce chips that emulate a standard
    > architecture - so that an operating system would be unnecessary.
    >
    > I am not knowledgeable enough to evaluate ideas like that, but, if anyone
    > is interested, I would certainly value your opinions.
    > --
    > Chris


    Well, currently we already now see many small device coming out with some
    type of intelligence, some kind of small operating system inside.

    MP3 players of small and big sizes.
    Mobile phones including camera and MP3 player.
    Clocks.
    Coffee machines.
    Micro waves.
    etc

    The Linux kernel f.ex. is small and can easily be configured to do a small
    job, and burned on a small EPROM making f.ex. your advanced coffee machine
    making the right coffeee.

    The problem is that a chip can only do what it has been programmed to do.
    As long new hardware devices are coming out every month, we need to be able
    to make changes to the operating system without changing chip.
    So I think operating systems still have a long life, all depending on for
    what use.

    Brgds
    Torben



  3. Re: Race against time?

    On Thu, 03 Nov 2005 08:07:58 +0000, Chris wrote:

    > I'm starting to feel my way into Debian Sarge and am finding it both
    > difficult and interesting. I bought two books which helped:
    >
    > "Debian GNU/Linux 3.X Bible"
    > David B. Harris; Paperback; £17.49
    >
    > "The Debian System: Concepts and Techniques"
    > Maurice Krafft; Paperback; £21.68
    >
    > However, while daydreaming about the future, I wonder whether Debian
    > will beat the clock? I have read that the end of operating systems is
    > nigh.
    > Chip manufacturers are working to produce chips that emulate a standard
    > architecture - so that an operating system would be unnecessary.
    >
    > I am not knowledgeable enough to evaluate ideas like that, but, if
    > anyone is interested, I would certainly value your opinions.


    IMHO - that ain't gonna happen. Ever hear of a Commodore 64?


  4. Re: Race against time?

    Chris wrote:

    > I'm starting to feel my way into Debian Sarge and am finding it both
    > difficult and interesting. I bought two books which helped:
    >
    > "Debian GNU/Linux 3.X Bible"
    > David B. Harris; Paperback; 17.49
    >
    > "The Debian System: Concepts and Techniques"
    > Maurice Krafft; Paperback; 21.68
    >
    > However, while daydreaming about the future, I wonder whether Debian
    > will beat the clock? I have read that the end of operating systems is
    > nigh.
    > Chip manufacturers are working to produce chips that emulate a standard
    > architecture - so that an operating system would be unnecessary.
    >
    > I am not knowledgeable enough to evaluate ideas like that, but, if
    > anyone is interested, I would certainly value your opinions.


    I guess we'll see.

    In the years past they have tried to put more and more of the OS required
    instructions into the hardware. The Digital Equipment Corp. (DEC) VAX grew
    up in that arena. The problem seemed to be the more they added to the
    hardware to support the advanced instruction sets, which did make
    programming easier, the harder it was to get the throughput up. The VAX
    was said to be a Very Large Instruction Set Computer (VLISC). Then Reduced
    Instruction Set Computer (RISC) proved that decreasing the hardware
    complexity was a big enough gain in speed to warrant using more
    instructions to accomplish the task. So then DEC went from the 32-bit VAX
    computers to the 64-bit Alpha computers. Running the same OpenVMS OS Alpha
    System's kicked butt in comparison.

    To kinda of compare, if you have ever looked at the cpu instruction set such
    as Intel's 386 (and up) it would be like looking at a four function
    calculator. It does the basic +, -, / and X. Looking at the VAX the
    instructions included things such as polynomial, insert into queue, remove
    from queue, etc. I took a formal one week course to learn the VAX
    instruction set and it was some intense learning. I took a formal class on
    a different mid-range computer that only had 13 instructions, which only
    took one day, but to get any work done took lots of programming. The Alpha
    has more than 13 but less than Intel supports in a Pentium CPU.

    Anyway my last meeting with Microsoft over licensing they almost acted
    shocked that I would ever buy a PC without their OS on it. While it is
    true that most of my PC's at work are running Microsoft Windows, but the
    only stable PC's are running Linux or SCO Unix. Still the best systems we
    have are the Alpha's running OpenVMS.

    My two cents.


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