Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy! - CP/M

This is a discussion on Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy! - CP/M ; "jsnospam@cimmeri.com" wrote in message news:1185840664.918930.111070@w3g2000hsg.googlegro ups.com... > What's the format of disks are you desiring to transfer? > > I have a USB 3.5" dual speed (300/360rpm) dual datarate 250kbps/ > 500kbps drive here plugged into my WinXP PC. I ...

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Thread: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

  1. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    "jsnospam@cimmeri.com" wrote in message
    news:1185840664.918930.111070@w3g2000hsg.googlegro ups.com...

    > What's the format of disks are you desiring to transfer?
    >
    > I have a USB 3.5" dual speed (300/360rpm) dual datarate 250kbps/
    > 500kbps drive here plugged into my WinXP PC. I just formatted a few
    > 5.25" SSDD and DSDD CPM formats onto it at 300rpm, 250kbps... which
    > means a 5.25" drive would interface with no problem and do the same.
    >
    > Let me know your format and I'll see if it's possible.



    I have 180K, SS, 320K DS, 360K DS, 1.2M DS disks.
    Some Kaypro, some IBM, some TRS-80.
    I'd like to be able to read them all.

    Tom Lake


  2. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Jul 30, 7:28 pm, "Tom Lake" wrote:

    > I have 180K, SS, 320K DS, 360K DS, 1.2M DS disks.
    > Some Kaypro, some IBM, some TRS-80.
    > I'd like to be able to read them all.


    The PC ones shouldn't be an issue.

    Re Kaypro or TRS80, I'd need to know the exact format specs... eg.
    Kaypro SSDD or DSDD, 40 or 80 trk. With the TRS80, the model # and
    the same format specs.

    ~ J


  3. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    Tom Lake wrote in message <46ae8241$0$8031$4c368faf@roadrunner.com>...
    >"jsnospam@cimmeri.com" wrote in message
    >news:1185840664.918930.111070@w3g2000hsg.googlegro ups.com...
    >
    >> What's the format of disks are you desiring to transfer?




    >I have 180K, SS, 320K DS, 360K DS, 1.2M DS disks.
    >Some Kaypro, some IBM, some TRS-80.
    >I'd like to be able to read them all.


    TRS-80:

    http://www.trs-80emulators.com/

    Maybe ReadDisc is something for you.

    Kaypro:
    Did you try 22disk?

    www.nostalgia8.nl/cpm/util/22dsk144.zip

    Greetz. Katzy.



  4. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    By the way, the guys who have the Buslink 3.5" drives that are a USB
    controller and a standard 3.5" drive have about a dozen of them. They
    are listed on E-Bay, they are going for about $15 + shipping.


    Katzy wrote:
    > Tom Lake wrote in message <46ae8241$0$8031$4c368faf@roadrunner.com>...
    >> "jsnospam@cimmeri.com" wrote in message
    >> news:1185840664.918930.111070@w3g2000hsg.googlegro ups.com...
    >>
    >>> What's the format of disks are you desiring to transfer?

    >
    >
    >
    >> I have 180K, SS, 320K DS, 360K DS, 1.2M DS disks.
    >> Some Kaypro, some IBM, some TRS-80.
    >> I'd like to be able to read them all.

    >
    > TRS-80:
    >
    > http://www.trs-80emulators.com/
    >
    > Maybe ReadDisc is something for you.
    >
    > Kaypro:
    > Did you try 22disk?
    >
    > www.nostalgia8.nl/cpm/util/22dsk144.zip
    >
    > Greetz. Katzy.
    >
    >


  5. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    > Maybe ReadDisc is something for you.
    >
    > Kaypro:
    > Did you try 22disk?


    The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.

    Tom Lake



  6. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 18:48:23 -0400, "Tom Lake"
    wrote:

    >> Maybe ReadDisc is something for you.
    >>
    >> Kaypro:
    >> Did you try 22disk?

    >
    >The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    >be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    >There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.


    Ahem, What the bios supports is only important if your booting off
    the drive. Also the drive cable may permit the usual twist
    and select option just the bios doesn't care (or use it).


    If you are running dos or W98 (NT4, Win2000, and XP don't like this)
    and load a program that talks to the floppy hardware directly then
    things are far more flexible. All it takes is software that doesn't
    do a BIOS call to do floppy IO. An example of that would be FCOPY,
    Imagedisk, and likely a few I forgot to mention.


    Allison



    >
    >Tom Lake
    >



  7. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    No, some modern motherboards only support 1 floppy disk drive, period.
    There is no functional drive select capability (AT ALL); if you can't
    toggle drive select lines in hardware, you are pretty much screwed. It
    pisses me off, but I'm on my 2nd such motherboard. And it's becoming
    FAR more common.


    no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    > On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 18:48:23 -0400, "Tom Lake"
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> Maybe ReadDisc is something for you.
    >>>
    >>> Kaypro:
    >>> Did you try 22disk?

    >> The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    >> be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    >> There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.

    >
    > Ahem, What the bios supports is only important if your booting off
    > the drive. Also the drive cable may permit the usual twist
    > and select option just the bios doesn't care (or use it).
    >
    >
    > If you are running dos or W98 (NT4, Win2000, and XP don't like this)
    > and load a program that talks to the floppy hardware directly then
    > things are far more flexible. All it takes is software that doesn't
    > do a BIOS call to do floppy IO. An example of that would be FCOPY,
    > Imagedisk, and likely a few I forgot to mention.
    >
    >
    > Allison
    >
    >
    >
    >> Tom Lake
    >>

    >


  8. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Jul 31, 7:41 pm, Barry Watzman wrote:
    > No, some modern motherboards only support 1 floppy disk drive, period.
    > There is no functional drive select capability (AT ALL); if you can't
    > toggle drive select lines in hardware, you are pretty much screwed. It
    > pisses me off, but I'm on my 2nd such motherboard. And it's becoming
    > FAR more common.
    >


    Is there the setup option on booting [various F1, F2, F6, F12] which
    gives access to change physical configurations as well as bootstrap
    defaults?

    Some bios's require enabling in there before the controller will be
    allowed to look for, and recognize, another physically attached
    device.

    Steve
    >
    >
    > no.s...@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    > > On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 18:48:23 -0400, "Tom Lake"
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >>> Maybe ReadDisc is something for you.

    >
    > >>> Kaypro:
    > >>> Did you try 22disk?
    > >> The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    > >> be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    > >> There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.

    >
    > > Ahem, What the bios supports is only important if your booting off
    > > the drive. Also the drive cable may permit the usual twist
    > > and select option just the bios doesn't care (or use it).

    >
    > > If you are running dos or W98 (NT4, Win2000, and XP don't like this)
    > > and load a program that talks to the floppy hardware directly then
    > > things are far more flexible. All it takes is software that doesn't
    > > do a BIOS call to do floppy IO. An example of that would be FCOPY,
    > > Imagedisk, and likely a few I forgot to mention.

    >
    > > Allison

    >
    > >> Tom Lake- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -




  9. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    >>The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    >>be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    >>There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.

    >
    > Ahem, What the bios supports is only important if your booting off
    > the drive. Also the drive cable may permit the usual twist
    > and select option just the bios doesn't care (or use it).


    No, the motherboard hardware simply doesn't allow more than one floppy drive
    no matter how the cable is twisted. Neither XP nor Vista will see more than
    the
    one 3.5" drive the mobo allows. There are more and more systems that are
    doing
    this these days.

    Tom Lake




  10. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 20:41:33 -0400, Barry Watzman
    wrote:

    >No, some modern motherboards only support 1 floppy disk drive, period.
    >There is no functional drive select capability (AT ALL); if you can't
    >toggle drive select lines in hardware, you are pretty much screwed. It
    >pisses me off, but I'm on my 2nd such motherboard. And it's becoming
    >FAR more common.


    Simple solution, don't upgrade. I keep old machines for that reason
    alone.

    Allison


    >
    >
    >no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    >> On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 18:48:23 -0400, "Tom Lake"
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Maybe ReadDisc is something for you.
    >>>>
    >>>> Kaypro:
    >>>> Did you try 22disk?
    >>> The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    >>> be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    >>> There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.

    >>
    >> Ahem, What the bios supports is only important if your booting off
    >> the drive. Also the drive cable may permit the usual twist
    >> and select option just the bios doesn't care (or use it).
    >>
    >>
    >> If you are running dos or W98 (NT4, Win2000, and XP don't like this)
    >> and load a program that talks to the floppy hardware directly then
    >> things are far more flexible. All it takes is software that doesn't
    >> do a BIOS call to do floppy IO. An example of that would be FCOPY,
    >> Imagedisk, and likely a few I forgot to mention.
    >>
    >>
    >> Allison
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Tom Lake
    >>>

    >>



  11. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 21:22:37 -0400, "Tom Lake"
    wrote:

    >>>The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    >>>be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    >>>There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.

    >>
    >> Ahem, What the bios supports is only important if your booting off
    >> the drive. Also the drive cable may permit the usual twist
    >> and select option just the bios doesn't care (or use it).

    >
    >No, the motherboard hardware simply doesn't allow more than one floppy drive
    >no matter how the cable is twisted. Neither XP nor Vista will see more than
    >the
    >one 3.5" drive the mobo allows. There are more and more systems that are
    >doing
    >this these days.


    I doubt XP or Vista even care about floppies.

    I'll repeat myself, fine an old machine and DON'T run NT4, XP or VISTA
    so that you can freely acess the hardware. W98se is fine for this and
    will network nicely enough for transfers.

    Allison

    >
    >Tom Lake
    >
    >



  12. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    >>> The problem is my PC's BIOS only supports one floppy drive and that has to
    >>> be a 3.5" 1.44MB drive.
    >>> There is no option for drive B: or for 5.25" disks.


    >> Ahem, What the bios supports is only important if your booting off
    >> the drive. Also the drive cable may permit the usual twist
    >> and select option just the bios doesn't care (or use it).


    >No, some modern motherboards only support 1 floppy disk drive, period.
    >There is no functional drive select capability (AT ALL); if you can't
    >toggle drive select lines in hardware, you are pretty much screwed. It
    >pisses me off, but I'm on my 2nd such motherboard. And it's becoming
    >FAR more common.


    I've seen this too - many (most?) newer machines support only 1 FD,
    saves them a pin on the chipset.

    But Allisons comment MAY still be valid regarding 5.25" disks - all
    the boards I've tried still have a standard disk controller - it's just the
    drive B: select is missing. Even if the BIOS does not support it, you
    can connect a 5.25" drive and use ImageDisk or any other direct
    access program to read/write it. (I leave the BIOS settings at "none"
    for the drives in my imaging system).

    I have information on my site about connecting an external cable
    with adapters for various drives - this is oriented toward putting
    the external drive on as B:, however with a slight modification to
    the internal cable (remove the internal drive conenctor and have
    only one twist) It would work equally well for an external connection
    for various drives as A:

    I say "MAY" because there's a possibility that to further save money
    the makers will dial-out the 300kbps clock required for 5.25" DD, and
    may even dial-out the 250kbps clock needed for 3.5"/5.25" DD,
    after all - what PC uses DD disks these days? - Of course the entire
    FDC will disappear soon enough.

    Easiest solution if you want to deal with classic disks/formats is to
    find a good older machine with a good FDC and use it. I have a
    utility on my site to evaluate the FDC to determine it's capabilities
    (many PC FDCs cannot do SD and other formats required for some
    classic systems) as well as a small registry of mainboards and
    FDCs that have been tested and the results that have been
    reported.

    Dave

    --
    dave06a@ Low-cost firmware development tools: www.dunfield.com
    dunfield. Classic computer collection: www.classiccmp.org/dunfield
    com Stuff I have for sale: www.dunfield.com/sale


  13. About the PC floppy controller (was....re....

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 23:57:52 GMT, no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net
    wrote:
    ..........
    >If you are running dos or W98 (NT4, Win2000, and XP don't like this)
    >and load a program that talks to the floppy hardware directly then
    >things are far more flexible. All it takes is software that doesn't
    >do a BIOS call to do floppy IO.


    The PC was designed to pick up drivers from firmware (BIOS)
    chips, and floppy controllers with EPROM/PROM sockets were
    fairly common in the days of the switch from 5'' to 3'' drives.

    I never saw a 'collection' of these floppy bioses anywhere, but some
    were very capable of almost any kind of drive you could hook onto
    them. (including tape, optical, HD's, etc) Also seems to me, Copy II
    PC Option Board was really nothing more than a very intelligent
    floppy controller. There were others, too.

    Another issue had to do with the data separator - there were some
    data rates you could only get with an external one, if your board
    had a built-in (to the floppy micro controller) it wouldn't work with
    some drives. A separate separator was usually a little 8-pin device.

    Does this strike any memory chords?

    Bill

  14. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!


    > I'll repeat myself, fine an old machine and DON'T run NT4, XP or VISTA
    > so that you can freely acess the hardware. W98se is fine for this and
    > will network nicely enough for transfers.
    >
    > Allison


    Ya just don't get it! I'm offering to hire someone to build me
    a 5.25" floppy to USB interface. I know it is easier in the short
    run to keep an old machine around but that's not an option here.
    I need to be able to move a floppy drive between many machines
    that can't access a 5.25" floppy drive directly. *That* is the limiting
    parameter and any scenario which doesn't allow it is no solution.

    Tom Lake



  15. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!


    > Ya just don't get it! I'm offering to hire someone to build me
    > a 5.25" floppy to USB interface. I know it is easier in the short
    > run to keep an old machine around but that's not an option here.
    > I need to be able to move a floppy drive between many machines
    > that can't access a 5.25" floppy drive directly. *That* is the limiting
    > parameter and any scenario which doesn't allow it is no solution.


    Tom, I don't think your statement of intent is all that clear. A USB-
    >5.25" PC format floppy use is likely within reach, but you appear to

    also be expecting some kind of CPM compatibility.. and yet you haven't
    even defined EXACTLY what formats (though I have asked). Not all
    formats are created equal in this USB controller world. For someone
    who wants this so bad, you're not exactly putting in much effort
    yet... given the potential tremendous difficulty of the task.

    I can tell you right now, you're not going to get FM encoding via
    USB.. not unless you spend thousands and thousands of $ developing a
    special chip or other hardware... so forget about imaging, and pray
    all your disks are MFM encoded.

    ~ J


  16. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    > Tom, I don't think your statement of intent is all that clear. A USB-
    >>5.25" PC format floppy use is likely within reach, but you appear to

    > also be expecting some kind of CPM compatibility.. and yet you haven't
    > even defined EXACTLY what formats (though I have asked). Not all
    > formats are created equal in this USB controller world. For someone
    > who wants this so bad, you're not exactly putting in much effort
    > yet... given the potential tremendous difficulty of the task.


    The reason I asked in this group is because this is one of the last groups
    with real hardware specialists in it.

    My main objective, is 180K, 320K, 360K and 1.2MB
    PC formats. TRS-80 Model I/III or Tandy Model 4 formats,
    Kaypro, Xerox, Epson formats are welcome as well, although
    the main objective is PC-DOS formats. Applicants will
    have plenty of opportunity to get the exact specs during the
    interview.

    Tom Lake



  17. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Wed, 1 Aug 2007 20:29:58 -0400, "Tom Lake"
    wrote:

    >
    >> I'll repeat myself, fine an old machine and DON'T run NT4, XP or VISTA
    >> so that you can freely acess the hardware. W98se is fine for this and
    >> will network nicely enough for transfers.
    >>
    >> Allison

    >
    >Ya just don't get it! I'm offering to hire someone to build me
    >a 5.25" floppy to USB interface. I know it is easier in the short
    >run to keep an old machine around but that's not an option here.
    >I need to be able to move a floppy drive between many machines
    >that can't access a 5.25" floppy drive directly. *That* is the limiting
    >parameter and any scenario which doesn't allow it is no solution.
    >
    >Tom Lake


    Actually I do get it, "Translation I want and somebodies gotta do it".
    The horrible fact of life is that current PCs FDC and floppy are
    being dropped or soon to be. The 1.44mb drive is no longer a
    fit with 4GB thumb drives and the like. It's already reached maye
    even passed the point where people buy USB or before that parallel
    port devices to fill the gap of the PC not having a floppy or at least
    not the correct one. When does USB go poof like the floppy?

    But I'd not get involved in the folly of designing and building a one
    off (you might sell a few) then having to support it on maybe three
    OSs two of which or horrid and one that comes in far to many flavors.
    There are many here that can do it, I can but, will not as it's a lot
    of effort for something that has a simpler less costly solution.

    For those that forget the dimensions of the task are.

    Box with N many drives, likely two to satisfy the various drive
    needs. Thats a mechanical problem mostly. it needs power as
    well and most 5.25" drives cannot be powered off the USB bus.

    Firmware for the microcontroller with USB and FDC interfaces,
    the firmware needs to handle all possible FDC formats.

    Software for the host as the standard host driver will not recognize
    the special USB devices capability, it will have to be a registered
    driver as XP and Vista are likely targets.

    Software to talk to that driver to do the capture and organization
    of the data retrieved. It would also have to configure and
    otherwise monitor/control the USB device.

    How much you willing to pay? I figure it's a few weeks work
    between the hardware and then the PC based software for first proto.
    For a serious moment I'd estimate it as a minimum of 60 billable
    hours and I'd think at a bargan rate of say $50/hr it's a $3000 plus,
    material and external charges (machine shop, PC board fab,
    software development tools, misc materials) are on top of that.
    I'm sure most would say I've estimated low.

    Myself I'd invest in a used machine and use the remaining cash to
    holidy in a nice sunny island.

    The cheap way is to get a older PC (they are usually free) with decent
    NIC in it or even a USB and use that with the correct cables
    as a transfer machine. With available software you're there
    in a few minutes to a few hours at most.

    Then again I have PDP-11, uVAX,, AmproLb+, KayproII and 4/84,
    Visual1050, DEC Vt180, NS* plus a few S100 machines that read
    those formats natively. Add a few old 486s with NICs that do ok
    for the less esoteric soft sector formats. Sure, I don't do all
    (Apple for one) but that covers most of what I consider relevent to
    me. The problem of multiple formats and media incompatability has
    been familiar one since 1977 which is when I fired up my first floppy.
    It was 5..25" hard sector in a world of 8" SSSD, Paper tape, Audio
    casette and even Barcode. Since then I've realized that no matther
    how I standardized everything I still had to retain foreign format
    capability.


    Allison

    >



  18. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Wed, 1 Aug 2007 22:23:03 -0400, "Tom Lake"
    wrote:

    >> Tom, I don't think your statement of intent is all that clear. A USB-
    >>>5.25" PC format floppy use is likely within reach, but you appear to

    >> also be expecting some kind of CPM compatibility.. and yet you haven't
    >> even defined EXACTLY what formats (though I have asked). Not all
    >> formats are created equal in this USB controller world. For someone
    >> who wants this so bad, you're not exactly putting in much effort
    >> yet... given the potential tremendous difficulty of the task.

    >
    >The reason I asked in this group is because this is one of the last groups
    >with real hardware specialists in it.


    It's a firmware/software task and two must be complementary.

    Allison

    >My main objective, is 180K, 320K, 360K and 1.2MB
    >PC formats.


    Those are easy, you just need a 5.25" drive (two really).

    > TRS-80 Model I/III or Tandy Model 4 formats,
    >Kaypro, Xerox, Epson formats are welcome as well, although
    >the main objective is PC-DOS formats.


    Anyone that understand the problem knows the basic task.

    > Applicants will have plenty of opportunity to get the exact specs
    > during the interview.


    Allison

    >Tom Lake
    >



  19. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    no.spam@no.uce.bellatlantic.net wrote:
    (snip)

    > Actually I do get it, "Translation I want and somebodies gotta do it".
    > The horrible fact of life is that current PCs FDC and floppy are
    > being dropped or soon to be. The 1.44mb drive is no longer a
    > fit with 4GB thumb drives and the like. It's already reached maye
    > even passed the point where people buy USB or before that parallel
    > port devices to fill the gap of the PC not having a floppy or at least
    > not the correct one. When does USB go poof like the floppy?


    Apple dropped floppies about 10 years ago. The solution, then,
    was to use USB floppy drives! Most laptops dropped floppy for
    external USB floppy drives, too.

    (snip)

    > Software for the host as the standard host driver will not recognize
    > the special USB devices capability, it will have to be a registered
    > driver as XP and Vista are likely targets.


    I would do two separate boxes. I haven't looked at the USB protocols
    at all.

    > Software to talk to that driver to do the capture and organization
    > of the data retrieved. It would also have to configure and
    > otherwise monitor/control the USB device.


    Hopefully the existing host software works, but I don't know that.

    > How much you willing to pay? I figure it's a few weeks work
    > between the hardware and then the PC based software for first proto.
    > For a serious moment I'd estimate it as a minimum of 60 billable
    > hours and I'd think at a bargan rate of say $50/hr it's a $3000 plus,
    > material and external charges (machine shop, PC board fab,
    > software development tools, misc materials) are on top of that.
    > I'm sure most would say I've estimated low.


    Sounds about right to me.
    (snip)


    > Then again I have PDP-11, uVAX,, AmproLb+, KayproII and 4/84,
    > Visual1050, DEC Vt180, NS* plus a few S100 machines that read
    > those formats natively.


    For the ones he is most interested in, I believe they are
    256byte/sector. That should be an easy software change if the
    source for the USB/floppy software is available. As above, I
    don't know if windows knows how to read USB/floppy other than
    at 512 bytes/sector. Well, I don't even know if sector length
    matters in USB.

    The project gets more interesting for 8 inch drives, though I
    am sure that they can't be USB powered.

    Also, writing is a little harder than reading, and the OP didn't
    say which is needed.

    My choice would be to find some system to copy all the disks over
    to 3.5in and work with them that way.

    -- glen


  20. Re: Yee-Haa!! 5.25-inch USB floppy!

    On Aug 1, 9:23 pm, "Tom Lake" wrote:
    > My main objective, is 180K, 320K, 360K and 1.2MB
    > PC formats. TRS-80 Model I/III or Tandy Model 4 formats,
    > Kaypro, Xerox, Epson formats are welcome as well, although
    > the main objective is PC-DOS formats.


    Ok. As a preliminary test, here's what I was able to do SUCCESSFULLY
    with a WinXP box, a SmartDisk VST 3.5" USB Floppy Drive, Sydex's 22
    Disk, and a few manually overridden XP command prompt format commands:

    TRS Model 4 SSDD CPM 48tpi 5.25" format
    all IBM PC DD CPM86 5.25" formats
    all IBM PC DD DOS 5.25" formats incl. 1.2mb HD at 360rpm.

    I only tried a handful, but quite a few other attempted 5.25" formats
    would NOT work.

    It may be a leap, but I'm ASSUMING that a Buslink 3.5" assembly
    connected to a dualspeed 5.25" HD drive would produce as good results.

    I tried to find the Buslink for $15 but never could. Offer $22 for
    another, never heard back, so I'm out for now unless Tom you want to
    buy one for me then I'll try interfacing one of my dual speed 5.25" to
    it. But even so, remember, the number of successful formats will be
    narrow.

    ~ J


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