CP/M bootable CD? - CP/M

This is a discussion on CP/M bootable CD? - CP/M ; Larry wrote: > If you make the CD bootable with MSDOS or PCDOS then you don't have > to fight NT4 or XP for hardware rights. Most CD burning programs > (like Nero) can make a bootable CD. Then just ...

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Thread: CP/M bootable CD?

  1. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Larry wrote:
    > If you make the CD bootable with MSDOS or PCDOS then you don't have
    > to fight NT4 or XP for hardware rights. Most CD burning programs
    > (like Nero) can make a bootable CD. Then just autoexec into your
    > simulator.


    Yes, that's exactly what I'm thinking. It sidesteps all the hardware
    incompatibilities. Hiding under all the modern crap is still a plain old
    IBM PC. The basic services of the ROM BIOS should be all that an
    emulator needs to model a CP/M computer.
    --
    Ring the bells that still can ring
    Forget the perfect offering
    There is a crack in everything
    That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
    --
    Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

  2. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Hate to weigh in on this one so late,
    but here are some ideas:
    -use lilo or grub as a multiboot
    -consider using yaze as the CP/M
    emulator, or one of a bunch.

    Using linux to abstract the hardware would
    be particularly advantageous. Dual Mac/Pc
    would IMO be easier with linux, and reduce
    setup time, or at least change the setup
    parameters :^)

    For variety, one could experiment w/ DOSEMU
    to run emu's like MyZ80, and Joan Riff's emu.

    My experiences w/ wine were disappointing a few
    years ago, but, it might be worth looking into if
    you could make it run the SIMH MITS Altair
    8080/Z80 emulator.

    yaze and SIMH and MyZ80 all afford the opportunity
    to import and export files into and out of the emulated
    environment. Unless you're doing something truly
    massive, permanent storage could be achieved
    using 3.5" floppies.

    And what about ZipDisks? Slackware once had
    a version that would boot form a ZipDrive.

    SIMH also, IIRC, allow you some flexibility assigning
    disk images, hardware ports, etc. How far that will
    stretch with wine is unknown.

    Just my 2 lira. Sorry if I wizzed on the thread.

    Regards,
    Tarkin


  3. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    On Mon, 13 Feb 2006 22:56:50 GMT
    Lee Hart wrote:

    > Allison wrote:
    > > Interesting idea. You'd have to use one of the CP/M clones (P2dos,
    > > Zrdos and friends) to get around the 8mb limit of DRI CP/M. But
    > > having an emulator for a nice CP/M system (maybe even a full boat
    > > emulation) that "just runs" from a CD would likely be popular.
    > >
    > > When it comes to emulators, my favorites are MyZ80 and Dave
    > > Dunfield's Horizon as they suit my particular likes and needs.

    >
    > Yes; CP/M-80 is what I had in mind. I'm more familiar with it, and
    > it's the harder problem


    Conceptually, it could be done by using a "720k" format floppy, and
    using a raw image as the boot image. In Linux, such a CD could be
    created as:

    1. After creating the bootable floppy, create the image file with "dd
    if=/dev/fd0 of=boot.img bs=512 count=1440"
    2. make the bootable CD image file "mkisofs -R -b boot.img -o cd.iso[list of files on CD]"
    3. burn the cd "cdrecord -v dev=0,0,0 -speed=8 -eject cd.iso"

    Of course, the device designators above will need adjusting for your
    system.

    To boot, the BIOS firmware will need to recognize the CD device, then
    read the "boot tracks" (first 11-12 kB) of the image. I would suggest
    using a format of 3 system tracks (9-512 byte sectors, or 4.5 kB, per
    track) since your system will need a healthy BIOS to access the CD and
    RAM disks.

    The raw base code might benefit from the CD-reading code and B/P Bios
    sources available at: http://home.att.net/~halbower/

    Hal

  4. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Lee Hart wrote:
    > Larry wrote:
    >
    >> If you make the CD bootable with MSDOS or PCDOS then you don't have
    >> to fight NT4 or XP for hardware rights. Most CD burning programs
    >> (like Nero) can make a bootable CD. Then just autoexec into your
    >> simulator.

    >
    > Yes, that's exactly what I'm thinking. It sidesteps all the hardware
    > incompatibilities. Hiding under all the modern crap is still a plain
    > old IBM PC. The basic services of the ROM BIOS should be all that an
    > emulator needs to model a CP/M computer.


    Except it comes up running 8086 code, and accessing a memory space
    of 1 Meg, of which 640k is writable. I suspect the hard disks are
    limited to no more than 512 Meg also, but this may be in error.

    --
    Some informative links:
    news:news.announce.newusers
    http://www.geocities.com/nnqweb/
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html
    http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html


  5. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 02:43:07 GMT, "Larry"
    wrote:

    >
    > wrote in message
    >> The biggest problem is if the sim wants to use ports (printer, serial
    >> disk) OSs such as NT4 and nt5(win2000/xp) tend to barf at that. it's
    >> doable but more messing with PC programming than I consider fun.
    >>
    >> Allison

    >
    >If you make the CD bootable with MSDOS or PCDOS then you don't have to fight
    >NT4 or XP for hardware rights. Most CD burning programs (like Nero) can
    >make a bootable CD. Then just autoexec into your simulator.
    >
    >Larry
    >


    That wasnt what I was talking about specifically. I was refering to
    the printer, serial ports and floopy disk from inside the simulator.
    IE: an application that actually wants to use the IO directly.


    Allison

  6. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 04:48:21 GMT, Lee Hart
    wrote:

    >Larry wrote:
    >> If you make the CD bootable with MSDOS or PCDOS then you don't have
    >> to fight NT4 or XP for hardware rights. Most CD burning programs
    >> (like Nero) can make a bootable CD. Then just autoexec into your
    >> simulator.

    >
    >Yes, that's exactly what I'm thinking. It sidesteps all the hardware
    >incompatibilities. Hiding under all the modern crap is still a plain old
    >IBM PC. The basic services of the ROM BIOS should be all that an
    >emulator needs to model a CP/M computer.


    If your booting an OS so you don't run the systems OS that would work
    but then you may loose access to the systems hard disk (NTFS and all).
    I'm sure that can be worked out. Rom BIOS and dos is least painful as
    dos will let you at the devices though if speed is an issue all the
    special drivers for buses may be problematic.


    Allison


  7. Re: CP/M-86 Hard Disk Capabilities (was: ' CP/M bootable CD?')


    On 2006-02-13 Allison P. said:

    > "Anonymous Guy" wrote:
    >
    > > Quoting from the "CP/M-86 User's Guide Supplement for the IBM
    > > Personal Computer and for the IBM Personal Computer XT," page 2-1:
    > >
    > > ,-------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > |
    > > | Section 2 - Support for the IBM Hard Disk
    > > |
    > > | Hard-disk Volume Size under CP/M-86
    > > |
    > > | In the Personal Computer XT and Personal Computer with IBM hard
    > > | disk, CP/M-86 allows you to configure a hard-disk volume size
    > > | from 10 cylinders to the maximum number of cylinders your hard
    > > | disk allows. Volumes of up to 8192K are completely compatible
    > > | with CP/M-86. Volumes larger than 8192K are compatible with
    > > | Concurrent CP/M-86, Digital Research's multitasking operating
    > > | system for the Personal Computer XT. If you specify a volume
    > > | size larger than 8192K, HDMAINT warns you that it cannot be used
    > > | with CP/M-86. CP/M-86 is not able to access your hard disk if
    > > | you specify a volume size larger than 8192K.
    > > |
    > > |_________________________________________________ _________________

    >
    >
    > My CPM86 alteration guide has none of that crap.



    Of course it doesn't. And the owner's manual for a 1963 Karmann
    Ghia doesn't mention catalytic converters or air bags, either.


    > It's a PCism.



    Well, yeah. Given the fact that "CP/M-86 For The IBM" was designed
    for use on a PC, one might reasonably expect "a PCism" or two.


    > And my guide is old enough that Concurrent was not a pruduct for
    > a bunch of years.
    >
    > Allison



    Aye; and there's the rub.

    Unlike CP/M-80 and certain other CP/M-86 permutations, "CP/M-86 For
    The IBM" was not designed or intended to be "altered" by the user.

    That's not to say that a competent hacker like yourself COULDN'T
    alter it, if you were highly motivated to do so. But DRI discouraged
    such miscreancy, and didn't make alteration easy or convenient.

    The IBM-specific BIOS was not provided with the O.S. distribution.
    Or anywhere else, for that matter (possibly a copyright or a licen-
    sing issue).

    So today, if the average non-hacker redneck wants to run CP/M-86 1.1
    on modern PC hardware, he's pretty much constrained to using the
    specific "CP/M-86 For The IBM" distribution. And using it exactly
    as it was provided by DRI, including the 8-meg hard disk limitation.

    Fortunately, third-party add-ons are now freely available to help
    ameliorate some of the O.S.'s shortcomings.

    Using such third-party software is a helluva lot easier than trying
    to hack the compiled CP/M-86 binary -- if you see what I mean, and
    I think you do.


  8. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    There's a program called porttalk here:
    http://www.beyondlogic.org/porttalk/porttalk.htm
    this gives user progs the ability to
    use hardware under NT/2000
    (incl. XP).

    Tarkin


  9. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Lee Hart wrote:

    > The first challenge may be to pick a good CP/M emulator. I'm not really
    > happy with the ones I have; they all make many compromises to be
    > DOS-like rather than CP/M-like. They require renaming .COM files as
    > .CPM, or don't have a real BDOS or CCP, or don't emulate any CP/M style
    > terminal, or other things that cause many CP/M programs not to work.


    You can try aliados, http://www.arrakis.es/~ninsesabe/aliados/

    The 0.2.0 version, still unfinished, may have all the functionality you
    want. It has his own command line, but can execute a non-banked CP/M Plus
    CCP.

    --
    Salu2

  10. Re: CP/M bootable CD?


    wrote in message
    news:5vk3v11nsbepht5gk2c1ri3clnfapnj1e2@4ax.com...
    > On Tue, 14 Feb 2006 02:43:07 GMT, "Larry"
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> wrote in message
    >>> The biggest problem is if the sim wants to use ports (printer, serial
    >>> disk) OSs such as NT4 and nt5(win2000/xp) tend to barf at that. it's
    >>> doable but more messing with PC programming than I consider fun.
    >>>
    >>> Allison

    >>
    >>If you make the CD bootable with MSDOS or PCDOS then you don't have to
    >>fight
    >>NT4 or XP for hardware rights. Most CD burning programs (like Nero) can
    >>make a bootable CD. Then just autoexec into your simulator.
    >>
    >>Larry
    >>

    >
    > That wasnt what I was talking about specifically. I was refering to
    > the printer, serial ports and floopy disk from inside the simulator.
    > IE: an application that actually wants to use the IO directly.
    >
    >
    > Allison


    So was I. Booting in DOS avoids NT's hardware protection for directly
    accessing the hardware from an emulator. That's what I have to do to
    read/write real floppies from my emulators.

    Larry



  11. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    > So was I. Booting in DOS avoids NT's hardware protection for directly accessing the
    > hardware from an emulator. That's what I have to do to read/write real floppies
    > from my emulators.


    Have you tried DosBox? I haven't but supposedly it allows DOS programs
    run in Windows to access the hardware directly without having to reboot.

    Tom Lake



  12. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Tom Lake wrote:
    :> So was I. Booting in DOS avoids NT's hardware protection for directly accessing the
    :> hardware from an emulator. That's what I have to do to read/write real floppies
    :> from my emulators.

    : Have you tried DosBox? I haven't but supposedly it allows DOS programs
    : run in Windows to access the hardware directly without having to reboot.

    Not quite; it provides emulated hardware for the DOS programs to use.

    --
    ------------- http://www.seasip.demon.co.uk/index.html --------------------
    John Elliott |BLOODNOK: "But why have you got such a long face?"
    |SEAGOON: "Heavy dentures, Sir!" - The Goon Show
    :-------------------------------------------------------------------------)

  13. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Tarkin wrote:
    > Hate to weigh in on this one so late,
    > but here are some ideas:
    > -use lilo or grub as a multiboot
    > -consider using yaze as the CP/M
    > emulator, or one of a bunch.
    >
    > Using linux to abstract the hardware would
    > be particularly advantageous. Dual Mac/Pc
    > would IMO be easier with linux, and reduce
    > setup time, or at least change the setup
    > parameters :^)


    Dual boot would require two complete copies of Linux
    on the CD. Is there going to be enough free space
    for all the emulated software?

    Better would to just use the MAC OS for the MAC,
    and have versions of the emulators compiled for it.
    Most MAC people buy it for the MAC OS, might as
    well let them use it.

    Linux might be a bit bulky (as well as making
    the CD unreadable under Windows). Would FreeDOS
    work better?

    >
    > For variety, one could experiment w/ DOSEMU
    > to run emu's like MyZ80, and Joan Riff's emu.


    Doesn't MyZ80 run under Linux already?
    Or, instead of booting Linux, you could use
    FreeDOS, which (iirc) already has a bootable CD.
    Lets you lose one whole level of emulation
    (Linux->dosemu->MyZ80 vs FreeDOS->MyZ80)

    >
    > My experiences w/ wine were disappointing a few
    > years ago, but, it might be worth looking into if
    > you could make it run the SIMH MITS Altair
    > 8080/Z80 emulator.


    Why mess around with wine to run simh?
    It runs natively on Linux/Knoppix,
    probably better than it does under windows.

    >
    > yaze and SIMH and MyZ80 all afford the opportunity
    > to import and export files into and out of the emulated
    > environment. Unless you're doing something truly
    > massive, permanent storage could be achieved
    > using 3.5" floppies.
    >
    > And what about ZipDisks? Slackware once had
    > a version that would boot form a ZipDrive.


    Zip disks are much rarer these days.
    CD's are common. Floppies are disappearing.
    You might want to look at a USB stick instead
    of a zip drive. Or a CD that uses the USB for
    persistent storage.

    >
    > SIMH also, IIRC, allow you some flexibility assigning
    > disk images, hardware ports, etc. How far that will
    > stretch with wine is unknown.


    Again, why mess around with wine?
    Under Linux/Knoppix, you can attach directly to the
    CD, to disk images stored on the CD, attach to the
    network, etc.

    I would be surprised if it wouldn't run on FreeDOS.

    simh is not a Windows-only program.

    >
    > Just my 2 lira. Sorry if I wizzed on the thread.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Tarkin
    >


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  14. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    >Dual boot would require two complete copies of Linux
    >on the CD. Is there going to be enough free space
    >for all the emulated software?


    I goofed here. I have an old Debian "Woody" for PPC on
    a mini-cd (210? 180? 185? Mb); a little research turned up
    that this would be a net-install image, and not the full thing.
    I know that there are, however, other not-necessarily-net-install
    distros out there, that would weigh in around~ 200Mb. If one
    were for m68k (or PPC), and one for PC: 2 X 200Mb = 400Mb.
    750Mb - 450Mb = 350Mb, which should be sufficient for an
    emulator or two.
    I wasn't going to bring it up, but what the hell; I was cleaning
    my mouth and it went off.....why not start a LFS project?
    Aimed specifically at creating a lightweight distro for
    implementing 'nostalgic' emulators? If it gains momentum,
    you could always add framebuffer/SDL support for vector-terminal
    emulation(Vectrex,Tektronix, etc...) and other
    (i.e. MAME) retro indulgences........

    >Better would to just use the MAC OS for the MAC,
    >and have versions of the emulators compiled for it.
    >Most MAC people buy it for the MAC OS, might as
    >well let them use it

    I presume you mean mac os X. Anything you compile
    for mac os X would be completely useless on my powerbook
    145b, running mac os System 7.1, and equally useless
    on my powermac 7600 running mac os system 8.

    >(as well as making
    >the CD unreadable under Windows)

    To verify my earlier goof, I popped said mini-cd,
    containing (to my surprise) Debian 'Potato' and
    'Woody' directories for m68k, into my pc's cd reader.
    The README.txt was fine. Come to think of it, the
    issue isn't one necessarily making it 'unreadable';
    it's how to put two separate / partitions on one cd...
    oddly enough, prelim research indicates this may be
    *easier* for the mac....lookie here:
    http://www.mactech.com/articles/deve...Partition.html
    In any event, this (two distros on one cd) was a
    dumb suggestion. It may not be possible to have two
    different distros on one disc. 8^P

    >Doesn't MyZ80 run under Linux already?

    "MYZ80 runs beautifully on IBM AT compatible (or better)
    computers under DOS 3.3 compatible (or later)
    operating systems. This includes running under OS/2 2.x,
    Desqview, and Windows 3.x."
    ....to quote the site. Were you thinking of yaze? or Z80pack?

    >Or, instead of booting Linux, you could use
    >FreeDOS, which (iirc) already has a bootable CD.
    >Lets you lose one whole level of emulation
    >(Linux->dosemu->MyZ80 vs FreeDOS->MyZ80)

    ....is a great idea, and conceptually on the mark.
    Or, you could just boot dos, and be absolutely
    certain that it will work. IIRC, most burners will
    allow you to create bootable cd's which mimic
    a floppy's bootsector.

    >Why mess around with wine to run simh?
    >It runs natively on Linux/Knoppix,

    ??? I am unaware of any precompiled binaries of
    simh for any distro. Doesn't mean they don't exist;
    doesn't mean you wouldn't build it for whatever distro.
    Update: there seems to be an rpm for SuSe 9.3 on
    i586 architecture. I am wary, however, of 'runs
    natively on Linux/Knoppix' when the site has a
    nice shiny link to a zip of windows executables right
    under the source link. Having an #if defined (__GNUC__)
    does not make it 'linux native', nor can I find any support
    for this statement in the sources. See Q4.7 of the FAQ.
    For a 'native Linux' app, why use windows as an example?

    >Zip disks are much rarer these days.

    I would debate the 'much' part of this statement.
    I suppose it depends on where you are.
    Zip drives do seem to be making a marked
    presence on the 'clearance' rack these days, tho'.
    I only mentioned it because a) I'm a hardware packrat;
    b)because it holds less than a mini-cd, and yet there's
    a distro for it, c)it makes persistent storage easier,
    and d)because I'm a weenie- I like to try/suggest things
    just for the hell of it. Floppies, as you say, are rare also,
    but tomsrtbt is still one of my favorite novelty items/ tools.

    >I would be surprised if it wouldn't run on FreeDOS.

    I wouldn't. The executables and source .mak files
    are both clearly for windows. Console applications,
    but windows apps nonetheless.


    >simh is not a Windows-only program

    ....is *absolutely* correct, and I overlooked
    building it for the distro as part of the endeavor.
    I am a weenie, after all. I thought there may be
    some measure of ease to be gained by simply
    cranking the win binaries through wine. I was quite
    obviously smoking bannana peels when I thought that.
    The easiest thing to do would be to build it for the
    intended distro.

    Thank you for the input and lively discussion.

    and what say the OP??

    TTFN,
    Tarkin
    "No thank you Turkish. I'm sweet enough."


  15. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    > Dual boot would require two complete copies of Linux
    > on the CD. Is there going to be enough free space
    > for all the emulated software?


    Exactly. If a simple idea like emulating a CP/M computer requires
    hundreds of megabytes, you're doing it wrong.
    --
    Ring the bells that still can ring
    Forget the perfect offering
    There is a crack in everything
    That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
    --
    Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

  16. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Allison wrote:
    > If you're booting an OS so you don't run the systems OS, that would
    > work but then you may loose access to the systems hard disk (NTFS
    > and all). I'm sure that can be worked out.


    I would guess than no CP/M program (either CP/M-80 or CP/M-86) would
    *need* a huge hard drive, memory past 1 meg, or any of the other
    resources of a newer PC.
    --
    Ring the bells that still can ring
    Forget the perfect offering
    There is a crack in everything
    That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
    --
    Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

  17. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    Hal wrote:
    > Conceptually, it could be done by using a "720k" format floppy, and
    > using a raw image as the boot image. In Linux, such a CD could be
    > created as:
    >
    > 1. After creating the bootable floppy, create the image file with "dd
    > if=/dev/fd0 of=boot.img bs=512 count=1440"
    > 2. make the bootable CD image file "mkisofs -R -b boot.img -o cd.iso
    >[list of files on CD]"
    > 3. burn the cd "cdrecord -v dev=0,0,0 -speed=8 -eject cd.iso"
    >
    > Of course, the device designators above will need adjusting for your
    > system.
    >
    > To boot, the BIOS firmware will need to recognize the CD device, then
    > read the "boot tracks" (first 11-12 kB) of the image. I would suggest
    > using a format of 3 system tracks (9-512 byte sectors, or 4.5 kB, per
    > track) since your system will need a healthy BIOS to access the CD and
    > RAM disks.
    >
    > The raw base code might benefit from the CD-reading code and B/P Bios
    > sources available at: http://home.att.net/~halbower/


    Sounds good; I'll look into this. I'm also looking at DSL (Damn Small
    Linux) as a possible host for the emulator, so the bootable CD wouldn't
    need to have DOS or some other licensed operating system.
    --
    Ring the bells that still can ring
    Forget the perfect offering
    There is a crack in everything
    That's how the light gets in -- Leonard Cohen
    --
    Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net

  18. Re: CP/M bootable CD?

    On Wed, 22 Feb 2006 15:31:44 GMT, Lee Hart
    wrote:

    >Allison wrote:
    >> If you're booting an OS so you don't run the systems OS, that would
    >> work but then you may loose access to the systems hard disk (NTFS
    >> and all). I'm sure that can be worked out.

    >
    >I would guess than no CP/M program (either CP/M-80 or CP/M-86) would
    >*need* a huge hard drive, memory past 1 meg, or any of the other
    >resources of a newer PC.


    Well memory 64k is it for CP/M-80 (save for the V3 with banking). The
    emulator will need it's space in ram plus DOS or other small OS needs
    it's space.

    For laughs I fired up Daves, NS* emulator as a good test on a 486 with
    16mb and DOS 6.22 as the OS and it all fit in the first 1mb of ram
    comfortably and ran well at that. The only thing needed to do CDrom
    would be the CDdriver as I used a small 100mb ide drive (98% empty).
    Actualy the whole mess fit on a 3.5" floppy with several floppy
    images! NS* floppy images for DD are at most 360k. It was
    fully functional on an old 386/16 laptop with 2mb ram and 40mb drive.

    I tried the same with myZ80 and 1m of ram is enough though fully
    loaded it creates 3 8mb virtual disks on the IDE drive so you need
    24mb plus a few kbytes of storage. Still microscopic by current PC
    standards.

    The whole mess would fit it a corner of the unused part of the WC
    CDrom(which has Myz80, and a few other Emulators on it in Zip
    and TAR form!).


    Allison

  19. Re: CP/M bootable CD?


    >For laughs I fired up Daves, NS* emulator as a good test on a 486 with
    >16mb and DOS 6.22 as the OS and it all fit in the first 1mb of ram
    >comfortably and ran well at that. The only thing needed to do CDrom
    >would be the CDdriver as I used a small 100mb ide drive (98% empty).
    >Actualy the whole mess fit on a 3.5" floppy with several floppy
    >images! NS* floppy images for DD are at most 360k. It was
    >fully functional on an old 386/16 laptop with 2mb ram and 40mb drive.


    HORISON.COM requires a single 64k segment for the emulator
    code+data, and another 64k segment for the emulated system
    memory. So it should run in only 128k (plus perhaps a paragraph
    or two of DOS overhead).

    HORIZON.COM is about 19k, and another 20k for the help file
    (which you can do without) - so a 1.44M disk can hold DOS, the
    emulator and a few images (esp if they are only single-sided)

    Most bootable CDs create a "virtual floppy", so if you can live with
    the images that you can fit on the floppy, you wouldn't need the
    CD driver - if you want to be able to access literally thousands of
    disk images on a CD, all you need is a hardware driver loaded
    in config.sys and MSCDEX (or equivalent) loaded in autoexec.bat

    HORIZON will let you mount images read-only, which makes them
    look like the write-protect tab is installed (so you won't get I/O errors
    by trying to write to the CD).

    I've got a little IDECD.SYS driver which hasn't failed yet to recognize
    an IDE CD. The ones from the W95/W98 boot/install floppies should
    also be pretty generic (as they want them to work on as wide a range
    of system as possible).

    Regards,
    Dave

    --
    dave06a@ Collector of classic pre-PC computer systems.
    dunfield. If you have an old 8/16 bit non-PC system in need of a good
    com home, please contact me at email address on the left, or
    via contact link of this web site:
    http://www.parse.com/~ddunfield/museum/index.html


  20. Re: CP/M bootable CD?


    "Dave Dunfield" wrote
    in message news:Ir4Lf.1582$Xl.5416@newscontent-01.sprint.ca...
    --- --
    > dave06a@ Collector of classic pre-PC computer systems.
    > dunfield. If you have an old 8/16 bit non-PC system in need of a
    > good
    > com home, please contact me at email address on the left, or
    > via contact link of this web site:
    > http://www.parse.com/~ddunfield/museum/index.html



    What follows is off-topic to the rest of the group :-(.

    Dave,

    I can't reach www.dunfield.com and email forwarding via parse.com
    bounces. Is there a problem?



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