Re: Written-by-Bill-Gates BASIC Source Code - CP/M

This is a discussion on Re: Written-by-Bill-Gates BASIC Source Code - CP/M ; > Message-ID: Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch wrote: > Reporting "piracy"? Another term that doesn't apply to > unauthorized copying. Unless you commit it within international Since the Statute of Anne about 1703-ish, "pirate" has been the legal term for unauthorised actions ...

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Thread: Re: Written-by-Bill-Gates BASIC Source Code

  1. Re: Written-by-Bill-Gates BASIC Source Code

    > Message-ID:

    Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch wrote:
    > Reporting "piracy"? Another term that doesn't apply to
    > unauthorized copying. Unless you commit it within international


    Since the Statute of Anne about 1703-ish, "pirate" has been the
    legal term for unauthorised actions contrary to a copyright holders
    conditions.

    As the colonies came to an agreement to persue their own direction
    /after/ 1703, the Statute of Anne grandfathered into American
    states' law and unless modified by later local law, "pirate" is
    still a valid legal term for said actions in US states' laws.

    The Berne convention was based on pre-existing copyright laws.
    Countries that signed the convention implicitly incorporated the
    term "pirate" into their own law.

    --
    J.G.Harston - jgh@arcade.demon.co.uk - mdfs.net/User/JGH
    **** DO NOT EMPLOY MARREN BUILDERS/ROOFERS, SHEFFIELD ****


  2. Re: Written-by-Bill-Gates BASIC Source Code




    Jonathan Graham Harston wrote:
    >
    >Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch wrote:
    >
    >> Reporting "piracy"? Another term that doesn't apply to
    >> unauthorized copying. Unless you commit it within international

    >
    >Since the Statute of Anne about 1703-ish, "pirate" has been the
    >legal term for unauthorised actions contrary to a copyright holders
    >conditions.
    >
    >As the colonies came to an agreement to persue their own direction
    >/after/ 1703, the Statute of Anne grandfathered into American
    >states' law and unless modified by later local law, "pirate" is
    >still a valid legal term for said actions in US states' laws.
    >
    >The Berne convention was based on pre-existing copyright laws.
    >Countries that signed the convention implicitly incorporated the
    >term "pirate" into their own law.


    The MPAA and RIAA are now in the processs of bribing congress
    to change the word so that copying a song or mocvie is now
    "terrorism." When that loses impact, they will start having
    it called "pedophilia."



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