OT: HAL - CP/M

This is a discussion on OT: HAL - CP/M ; HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Well, it's an old computer, so it may not be completely OT. Roll each letter forward by one, and you have: IBM. Coincidence?...

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Thread: OT: HAL

  1. OT: HAL

    HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Well, it's an old computer, so it may not be
    completely OT.

    Roll each letter forward by one, and you have: IBM.

    Coincidence?

  2. Re: HAL

    "elaich" wrote in message news:44k6mlF2jql6U10@individual.net...
    > HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Well, it's an old computer, so it may not be
    > completely OT.
    >
    > Roll each letter forward by one, and you have: IBM.
    >
    > Coincidence?


    According to Arthur C. Clarke in his book, The Making of 2001, yes.
    According to the laws of probability, no. I still remember going to the
    premier in 1968 and being stunned by the visual beauty as well as awed
    by the technology used. The use of classical music for a space movie
    was unheard of at the time. My Uncle who was with me just said, "What in
    the
    world WAS all that at the end?"

    Tom Lake



  3. Re: OT: HAL

    On 4 Feb 2006 17:31:02 GMT, elaich wrote:

    >HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Well, it's an old computer, so it may not be
    >completely OT.
    >
    >Roll each letter forward by one, and you have: IBM.
    >
    >Coincidence?


    It was an in-joke way back when. For the same reason the Houston Texas
    pc user group way back when was HAL-PC.

  4. Re: HAL

    "elaich" wrote in message news:44k6mlF2jql6U10@individual.net...
    > HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Well, it's an old computer, so it may not be
    > completely OT.
    >
    > Roll each letter forward by one, and you have: IBM.
    >
    > Coincidence?


    Yes.

    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HAL_9000

    "Some versions state that the name HAL was derived by a one letter shift (see
    Caesar cipher) from the name IBM, although this has been denied by both Arthur
    C. Clarke and his fictional character Dr. Chandra, who states that "by now, any
    idiot should know that HAL stands for Heuristic ALgorithmic" (2010)."

    - Bill



  5. Re: HAL

    On Sat, 4 Feb 2006 15:33:32 -0500, "William J. Leary Jr."
    wrote:
    >
    >Yes.
    >
    >See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HAL_9000
    >
    >"Some versions state that the name HAL was derived by a one letter shift (see
    >Caesar cipher) from the name IBM, although this has been denied by both Arthur
    >C. Clarke and his fictional character Dr. Chandra, who states that "by now, any
    >idiot should know that HAL stands for Heuristic ALgorithmic" (2010)."
    >
    > - Bill
    >

    Like you can rely on anything in wikipedia lol

    Jim

  6. Re: HAL

    "Jim Attfield" wrote in message
    newshscu1lp6g62ie90vlkbo056qi1ina6kqm@4ax.com...
    > Like you can rely on anything in wikipedia lol


    You can, you've got sense enough to check the references. As a place to start,
    and for those references, it's quite valuable. If, for example, you look at
    the references for the article I noted you'll find "HAL's Legacy, An Interview
    with Arthur C. Clarke." where Clarke himself says "I've been trying for years
    to stamp out the legend that HAL was derived from IBM by the transmission of
    one letter. But, in fact, as I've said, in the book, HAL stands for Heuristic
    Algorithmic, H-A-L."

    No source is reliable if you're not a critical user. Hell, I recall correcting
    my kid's text books when they were in school.

    - Bill



  7. Re: HAL


    > HAL in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Well, it's an old computer, so it may not be
    > completely OT.


    I am afraid that you are making a mistake.

    It is not HAL, it is HAL-9000 (as far as I remember).

    > Roll each letter forward by one, and you have: IBM.
    >
    > Coincidence?


    When I was a COBOL programmer on IBM Mainframes,
    we all knew the following acronym:

    MBI = Made By Idiots

    (now, guess what is the reverse of MBI ?)

    Yours Sincerely,
    "French Luser"




  8. Re: HAL

    *William J. Leary Jr.* wrote on Mon, 06-02-06 08:00:
    >Hell, I recall correcting my kid's text books when they were in school.


    Quite. I have just paid money for both the Britannica and the Brockhaus
    only to find that in place where I'm interested and able to check the
    Wikipediae (English and German) are both more comprehensive and less
    error prone.
    There still is an error in the Chenobyl accident, but I have to find my
    sources before I can get to that, and I haven't actually seen those for
    nearly 20 years, so that may take time.


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