WordStar, hypenation, how was it done? - CP/M

This is a discussion on WordStar, hypenation, how was it done? - CP/M ; I am working on some code and while googling for ideas on how to hypenate words I came across an old (1991) article stating that wordstar used to hypenate words using a software routine. So I started wondering, was there ...

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Thread: WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

  1. WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

    I am working on some code and while googling for ideas on how to
    hypenate words I came across an old (1991) article stating that
    wordstar used to hypenate words using a software routine. So I started
    wondering, was there any cpm wordstar clones with source code that
    would show how they did it? Anybody have any clues?

    Bill H

  2. Re: WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

    Bill H wrote:
    > I am working on some code and while googling for ideas on how to
    > hypenate words I came across an old (1991) article stating that
    > wordstar used to hypenate words using a software routine. So I started
    > wondering, was there any cpm wordstar clones with source code that
    > would show how they did it? Anybody have any clues?


    The algorithm Knuth wrote for TeX is pretty well known, and
    likely used for other more recent systems.

    Otherwise, you can disassemble the old code.

    -- glen


  3. Re: WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

    Hello, "Bill H"!

    > I am working on some code and while googling for ideas on how to
    > hypenate words I came across an old (1991) article stating that
    > wordstar used to hypenate words using a software routine. So I started
    > wondering, was there any cpm wordstar clones with source code that
    > would show how they did it? Anybody have any clues?


    Better than a clue: an informed opinion!

    I don't know if you have remarked, but I am the only one, in the comp.os.cpm
    Newsgroup, who uses WordStar (Version 4) for writing.

    According to one of my programs, I have 800+ WS4 files on my hard disk.

    None of them uses hyphenation.

    I decided, years ago, never to use hyphenation, after reading, from time to
    time, articles or books were lines were broken at the wrong place -- because
    the editor re-used a file without checking it. The author had written his
    text using hyphenation for a particular width, and the editor was using
    another width.

    So, my solution is simple: no hyphenation, no problem.

    (If you insist on hyphenating, the "WordStar Reference Guide" explains how
    it hyphenates. I cannot retype everything (it is too long), but the
    following paragraph seems interesting: "WordStar decides when to stop and
    ask for an hyphen by counting the number of characters to the left of the
    right margin in any word that straddles that margin. If that number exceeds
    a preset minimum, WordStar stops. If not, it automatically moves the word to
    the next line. The default minimum value is five characters and can be
    changed with WSCHANGE." Conclusion: Read The Formidable Manual!...)

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  4. Re: WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
    > Hello, "Bill H"!
    >
    >> I

    > So, my solution is simple: no hyphenation, no problem.
    >
    > (If you insist on hyphenating, the "WordStar Reference Guide" explains how
    > it hyphenates. I cannot retype everything (it is too long), but the
    > following paragraph seems interesting: "WordStar decides when to stop and
    > ask for an hyphen by counting the number of characters to the left of the
    > right margin in any word that straddles that margin. If that number exceeds
    > a preset minimum, WordStar stops. If not, it automatically moves the word to
    > the next line. The default minimum value is five characters and can be
    > changed with WSCHANGE." Conclusion: Read The Formidable Manual!...)
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France
    >
    >
    >



    I don't know if it will help.

    http://oldcomputers.dyndns.org/publi...anuals/ws4.pdf

  5. Re: WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

    Hello, fritz!

    > I don't know if it will help.
    >
    > http://oldcomputers.dyndns.org/publi...anuals/ws4.pdf


    Well... I prefer my old paper version!

    (Page 176 of the paper version becomes page 195 of the PDF file.)

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  6. Re: WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

    On Aug 14, 5:39*pm, "Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France"
    wrote:
    > Hello, fritz!
    >
    > > I don't know if it will help.

    >
    > >http://oldcomputers.dyndns.org/publi...anuals/ws4.pdf

    >
    > Well... I prefer my old paper version!
    >
    > (Page 176 of the paper version becomes page 195 of the PDF file.)
    >
    > Yours Sincerely,
    > Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


    THanks guys - exactly what I was looking for - gives me enough to go
    by.

    Bill H

  7. Re: WordStar, hypenation, how was it done?

    *Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France* wrote on Thu, 08-08-14 20:22:
    >because the editor re-used a file without checking it.


    With decent programs that can't happen when reusing files --
    hyphenation is internally marked as such and distinct from
    hyphenated compounds. It does happen when copying and pasting text.
    Acrobat is very good here, when copying from Acrobat hyphenated words
    get stuck together again making lines more ragged.

    My own little script for reformatting text looks for double line ends
    and replaces them by some unique unused character, for copied material
    I can use TAB here. It then looks for the sequence hyphen-line end and
    deletes both. After that all line ends get replaced by spaces and for
    the last step the auxiliary caracter is replaced an end of paragraph, a
    in the simplest case.

    This algorithm will make mistakes every time a hyphenated compound gets
    split across lines. There is no universal solution for this. One might
    look for capaital letters and prevent French-American becoming
    FrenchAmerican, but the majority of comounds are not capitalized and
    red-green would still become redgreen.

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