I have an old CP/M machine - CP/M

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  1. I have an old CP/M machine

    While doing my cleanup around the house, I have been forced to think
    about my old Sanyo MBC-1000 system. I got it out, plugged it in and
    found that the 5-1/4 disks were still readable and the damn thing booted
    up!

    So this gets me wondering... are there people interested in buying these
    things? Is there a website that focuses on all this? I looked at eBay
    under vintage and either CP/M is not a going on there or they all get
    snatched up pretty quick.

    If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is, I can
    followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to seriously
    come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.

  2. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    There is serious interest in some older machines, but probably not much
    in the Sanyo. There is no single web site, but there are lots of web
    sites that deal with these systems (the most classical of which used 8",
    not 5.25" floppy drives).

    Jack Bauer wrote:
    > While doing my cleanup around the house, I have been forced to think
    > about my old Sanyo MBC-1000 system. I got it out, plugged it in and
    > found that the 5-1/4 disks were still readable and the damn thing booted
    > up!
    >
    > So this gets me wondering... are there people interested in buying these
    > things? Is there a website that focuses on all this? I looked at eBay
    > under vintage and either CP/M is not a going on there or they all get
    > snatched up pretty quick.
    >
    > If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is, I can
    > followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to seriously
    > come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.

    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  3. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    Barry Watzman wrote:
    > There is serious interest in some older machines, but probably not much
    > in the Sanyo. There is no single web site, but there are lots of web
    > sites that deal with these systems (the most classical of which used 8",
    > not 5.25" floppy drives).
    >
    > Jack Bauer wrote:
    >> While doing my cleanup around the house, I have been forced to think
    >> about my old Sanyo MBC-1000 system. I got it out, plugged it in and
    >> found that the 5-1/4 disks were still readable and the damn thing
    >> booted up!


    Thanks for the feedback. While it IS a Sanyo, it is surprisingly
    well-made. All metal construction, huge power supplies, and damn heavy!
    When they started making PC-compatibles they took quite a different
    (cheaper) approach. And it has 5-1/4" drives. I guess I never expected
    it to be any sort of collector item. And what can you really do with it
    today?

  4. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    > And what can you really do with it today?

    Anything you could do with it back then.

    De

  5. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    Dennis Boone wrote:
    > > And what can you really do with it today?

    >
    > Anything you could do with it back then.
    >
    > De


    No, really I can't. The BBS sites are all gone because everyone is on
    the internet. And Wordstar is no longer any sort of standard, nor is
    the floppy format, so I can't exchange documents with friends.

  6. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    On Aug 7, 9:05 pm, Jack Bauer wrote:
    > Dennis Boone wrote:
    > > > And what can you really do with it today?

    >
    > > Anything you could do with it back then.

    >
    > No, really I can't. The BBS sites are all gone because everyone is on
    > the internet. And Wordstar is no longer any sort of standard, nor is
    > the floppy format, so I can't exchange documents with friends.


    If you can find a Linux ISP which provides a shell account and dial-
    in, you can do email. Check some of the later telecom programs under
    CP/M. May take a bit of work.

    You can still use Wordstar and WordPerfect. You will need a serial or
    parallel printer. You may have to export files as flat text; your
    Windows system will have to have a utility (and drive) to read CP/M
    5.25 inch disks. Such programs exist...

    Same applies to spreadsheets, programming in C or Pascal or BASIC.

    "I can't use my Ford Model T, because the Interstate has 55 MPH
    speeds, the tire store doesn't stock my tires for it..." Then just
    drive it around the neighborhood, or to shows and events. Take your
    time....be creative. Imagine your friend's reaction when they get a
    "snail mail" letter from you, printed on a dot matrix printer!

    Herb Johnson
    retrotechnology.com

    Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
    http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/ sales web site
    -- old Mac, S-100, 1970's & 80's computers, 8-inch floppy
    email: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
    if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net


  7. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    On Thu, 7 Aug 2008 19:33:08 -0700 (PDT), Herb Johnson wrote:
    > On Aug 7, 9:05 pm, Jack Bauer wrote:
    >> Dennis Boone wrote:
    >> > > And what can you really do with it today?

    >>
    >> > Anything you could do with it back then.

    >>
    >> No, really I can't. The BBS sites are all gone because everyone is on
    >> the internet. And Wordstar is no longer any sort of standard, nor is
    >> the floppy format, so I can't exchange documents with friends.

    >
    > If you can find a Linux ISP which provides a shell account and dial-
    > in, you can do email. Check some of the later telecom programs under
    > CP/M. May take a bit of work.


    Sonic.net (my ISP) is a linux-based ISP, it offers a shell account
    (no extra charge) and dial-up. Parallel ptrs can be had -- I bo't an Epson
    LQ 570+ dot matrix ptr on eBay that works really well.

    --
    jimbo@sonic.net
    Linux: gawk, date, finger, wait, unzip, touch, nice, suck, strip, mount,
    fsck, umount, make clean, sleep. (Who needs porn when you have /usr/bin?)

  8. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    On Thu, 07 Aug 2008 18:05:36 -0700, Jack Bauer wrote:

    >Dennis Boone wrote:
    >> > And what can you really do with it today?

    >>
    >> Anything you could do with it back then.
    >>
    >> De

    >
    >No, really I can't. The BBS sites are all gone because everyone is on
    >the internet. And Wordstar is no longer any sort of standard, nor is
    >the floppy format, so I can't exchange documents with friends.


    I still have dial up access to World.std.com and that using TIN or RN
    is close to BBS.

    Allison

  9. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    Jack Bauer wrote in news:g7bjk5$poj$1@news.parasun.com:

    > If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is, I can
    > followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to seriously
    > come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.


    I'm 250 miles away from you. I wouldn't mind having the machine for
    nostalgia's sake, but 500 miles at today's gas prices?

    If you ever drive I-5 north into Oregon for any reason, let me know.

  10. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    Jack Bauer wrote:
    >
    > While doing my cleanup around the house, I have been forced to
    > think about my old Sanyo MBC-1000 system. I got it out, plugged
    > it in and found that the 5-1/4 disks were still readable and the
    > damn thing booted up!
    >
    > So this gets me wondering... are there people interested in
    > buying these things? Is there a website that focuses on all
    > this? I looked at eBay under vintage and either CP/M is not a
    > going on there or they all get snatched up pretty quick.
    >
    > If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is,
    > I can followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to
    > seriously come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.


    Maybe my memory is fouled, but I seem to remember that as an 8088
    machine, competing with the first IBM PCs. It ran MSDOS 1.x, which
    is much like CP/M.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



  11. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    In article <6g1vv8Fdm2atU1@mid.individual.net> x@y.z "elaich" writes:

    > Jack Bauer wrote in news:g7bjk5$poj$1@news.parasun.com:
    >
    > > If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is, I can
    > > followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to seriously
    > > come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.

    >
    > I'm 250 miles away from you. I wouldn't mind having the machine for
    > nostalgia's sake, but 500 miles at today's gas prices?
    >
    > If you ever drive I-5 north into Oregon for any reason, let me know.


    You guys in the US don't know you're born! Over here in the UK
    fuel is over GBP1 per litre, around GBP5 per gallon or US$10 !

    Enjoy you "low" fuel prices while you can...

    Pete


    --
    "We have not inherited the earth from our ancestors,
    we have borrowed it from our descendants."

  12. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    "Jack Bauer" wrote:

    > I guess I never expected it to be any sort of collector item.


    Well... Right now, on eBay, there is one for sale for $400.00 in New York...

    > And what can you really do with it today?


    Everything that a computer can do.

    Once you have "universal" computer running, it can do anything. The only
    difference between computers are their speed and their ease of programming.

    As I wrote in 2005:

    > Should I remind you that you can do only 6 things
    > with a computer, be it a Sinclair ZX-80 or a Connection Machine:
    > 1) word processing
    > 2) programming
    > 3) spread-sheet
    > 4) database
    > 5) communications
    > 6) graphics
    > As long as those 6 needs are satisfied, the computer is a
    > useful tool. And there are/were standards for those 6 needs
    > under CP/M: WordStar is obviously the standard for word
    > processors; BASIC is obviously the standard for programming,
    > MultiPlan is obviously the standard for spread-sheet, dBase II
    > is obviously the standard for database; XMODEM is obviously
    > the (lowest common denominator) standard for communications;
    > and finally GSX is obviously the standard graphics system for CP/M.


    Finally, I must tell you that I used WordStar 4 under CP/M on an Epson QX-10
    during 15 years, during which I was totally alone in my country. However,
    the screen was much better than this "IBM Clown" on which I type this. This
    one has black chars on white screen, and this hurts my eyes after each
    session, while my green chars on black screen never hurted my eyes. That's
    why I will go back to the Epson QX-10, if my eyesight deteriorates.

    Finally, I wrote a WS4-to-HTM File Converter, that takes care of Bold,
    Italics, Underlined, etc. That's how I print my WS4 files, on the laser
    printer of a cybercafe (cheaper than owning one laser printer). Over the
    years, I have published, in the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup, several programs
    handling WS4 files.

    Conclusion
    -----------

    As long as you have means to communicate with the outside world (a 3.5"
    drive, or a modem), you can perfectly continue to use daily a CP/M computer.
    Either I bring a 3.5" floppy to the cybercafe, or send the files to print to
    an e-mail provider, then open my mail at the cybercafe, and prints the HTML
    files from there (HTML provides me with a super printer driver. I think that
    I could run the MS-DOS version of WS4 under Windows but, then, I would have
    to setup the printer driver, and this huge laser printer is probably not
    among the list of laser printer made in 1987...).

    Finally, right now, some of use are working on a "TCP/IP stack for CP/M", to
    replace the standard "XMODEM" program.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France




  13. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    *Jack Bauer* wrote on Fri, 08-08-08 03:05:
    >The BBS sites are all gone because everyone is on the internet.


    Don't let the MAUS in Berlin hear that. It does not yet know that it's
    gone and serves me all my groups in the old far superiour protocol.

  14. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    *Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France* wrote on Fri, 08-08-08 08:54:
    >This one has black chars on white screen, and this hurts my eyes after
    >each session, while my green chars on black screen never hurted my eyes.


    And of course this has nothing whatsoever to do with your age at the
    time and now. I began my computing on an Atari and its 72 Hz black on
    white screen was generally considered far superiour to the common 50 Hz
    green on black ones and in direct comparison I agreed and still do,
    especially as my current one does 85 Hz.


  15. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    CBFalconer wrote:
    > Jack Bauer wrote:
    >> While doing my cleanup around the house, I have been forced to
    >> think about my old Sanyo MBC-1000 system. I got it out, plugged
    >> it in and found that the 5-1/4 disks were still readable and the
    >> damn thing booted up!
    >>
    >> So this gets me wondering... are there people interested in
    >> buying these things? Is there a website that focuses on all
    >> this? I looked at eBay under vintage and either CP/M is not a
    >> going on there or they all get snatched up pretty quick.
    >>
    >> If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is,
    >> I can followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to
    >> seriously come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.

    >
    > Maybe my memory is fouled, but I seem to remember that as an 8088
    > machine, competing with the first IBM PCs. It ran MSDOS 1.x, which
    > is much like CP/M.
    >


    No, your memory IS fouled. They came out with a cheapo PC-clone about a
    year after I bought this thing. I cannot remember the model at this
    point. It probably was MBC-something, thus the confusion. I have a CP/M
    system with Z80 processor. No doubt about this, I just booted up CP/M
    2.2 on it last week. It won't even read PC floppies.


  16. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    elaich wrote:
    > Jack Bauer wrote in news:g7bjk5$poj$1@news.parasun.com:
    >
    >> If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is, I can
    >> followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to seriously
    >> come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.

    >
    > I'm 250 miles away from you. I wouldn't mind having the machine for
    > nostalgia's sake, but 500 miles at today's gas prices?
    >
    > If you ever drive I-5 north into Oregon for any reason, let me know.



    I DO drive up North to Oregon on occasion, to visit friends farther
    North. Shipping is also a possibility.

    Send an email to me: mo#$%nama(&nious&!at yahoo dot com

    (you will have to decode that! take out the special characters)

  17. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    pete@nospam.demon.co.uk wrote:
    > x@y.z "elaich" writes:
    >

    .... snip ...
    >
    >> If you ever drive I-5 north into Oregon for any reason, let me
    >> know.

    >
    > You guys in the US don't know you're born! Over here in the UK
    > fuel is over GBP1 per litre, around GBP5 per gallon or US$10 !
    >
    > Enjoy you "low" fuel prices while you can...


    Yahbut - you have grave difficulties living 500 miles from the
    capital city. I am fairly certain 1000 miles is impossible,
    without emigrating. Meanwhile you can thank your high fuel taxes
    for reducing the density of SUVs and other monstrosities on your
    roads.

    --
    [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    [page]:
    Try the download section.



  18. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    In article <489CF3E1.439C89EF@yahoo.com>
    cbfalconer@maineline.net "CBFalconer" writes:

    > pete@nospam.demon.co.uk wrote:
    > > x@y.z "elaich" writes:
    > >

    > ... snip ...
    > >
    > >> If you ever drive I-5 north into Oregon for any reason, let me
    > >> know.

    > >
    > > You guys in the US don't know you're born! Over here in the UK
    > > fuel is over GBP1 per litre, around GBP5 per gallon or US$10 !
    > >
    > > Enjoy you "low" fuel prices while you can...

    >
    > Yahbut - you have grave difficulties living 500 miles from the
    > capital city. I am fairly certain 1000 miles is impossible,
    > without emigrating.


    True enough -- 900 miles is about the limit (unless one takes the
    "pretty" route, that is). Edinburgh to London is around 500
    miles by road (and can take hours...) so unless one has a lot of
    luggage it's more convenient to fly (and probably cheaper).

    > Meanwhile you can thank your high fuel taxes
    > for reducing the density of SUVs and other monstrosities on your
    > roads.


    If only!

    Pete
    --
    "We have not inherited the earth from our ancestors,
    we have borrowed it from our descendants."

  19. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    pete@nospam.demon.co.uk wrote:
    > In article <489CF3E1.439C89EF@yahoo.com>
    > cbfalconer@maineline.net "CBFalconer" writes:
    >
    >
    >>pete@nospam.demon.co.uk wrote:
    >>
    >>>x@y.z "elaich" writes:
    >>>

    >>
    >>... snip ...
    >>
    >>>>If you ever drive I-5 north into Oregon for any reason, let me
    >>>>know.
    >>>
    >>>You guys in the US don't know you're born! Over here in the UK
    >>>fuel is over GBP1 per litre, around GBP5 per gallon or US$10 !
    >>>
    >>>Enjoy you "low" fuel prices while you can...

    >>
    >>Yahbut - you have grave difficulties living 500 miles from the
    >>capital city. I am fairly certain 1000 miles is impossible,
    >>without emigrating.

    >
    >
    > True enough -- 900 miles is about the limit (unless one takes the
    > "pretty" route, that is). Edinburgh to London is around 500
    > miles by road (and can take hours...) so unless one has a lot of
    > luggage it's more convenient to fly (and probably cheaper).
    >
    >
    >>Meanwhile you can thank your high fuel taxes
    >>for reducing the density of SUVs and other monstrosities on your
    >>roads.

    >
    >
    > If only!
    >
    > Pete



    El Paso to Texarkana is about 750 miles.

    It's an easy drive.

    But you don't have Texas highways.



    --

    Richard

    (remove the X to email)

  20. Re: I have an old CP/M machine

    Jack Bauer wrote:
    > CBFalconer wrote:
    >> Jack Bauer wrote:
    >>> While doing my cleanup around the house, I have been forced to
    >>> think about my old Sanyo MBC-1000 system. I got it out, plugged
    >>> it in and found that the 5-1/4 disks were still readable and the
    >>> damn thing booted up!
    >>>
    >>> So this gets me wondering... are there people interested in
    >>> buying these things? Is there a website that focuses on all
    >>> this? I looked at eBay under vintage and either CP/M is not a
    >>> going on there or they all get snatched up pretty quick.
    >>>
    >>> If anyone is interested in what this thing (a Sanyo MBC-1000) is,
    >>> I can followup with some URL's to photos. And if anyone wants to
    >>> seriously come by and look at it, I live in the SF Bay area.

    >>
    >> Maybe my memory is fouled, but I seem to remember that as an 8088
    >> machine, competing with the first IBM PCs. It ran MSDOS 1.x, which
    >> is much like CP/M.
    >>

    >
    > No, your memory IS fouled. They came out with a cheapo PC-clone about a
    > year after I bought this thing. I cannot remember the model at this
    > point. It probably was MBC-something, thus the confusion. I have a CP/M
    > system with Z80 processor. No doubt about this, I just booted up CP/M
    > 2.2 on it last week. It won't even read PC floppies.
    >


    I ran across the November 1984 issue of Byte magazine. Sanyo PC's were
    the MBC-550, MBC-555, and MBC-555-2. I believe the "-2" thing was for
    the double-sided floppy option. The main appeal was being the first
    PC-clone under $1000. Think about that -- No hard disk, only one
    one-sided floppy, no color graphics, and people were excited that they
    could get all that for under $1k!

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